Fanged ‘Vampire Deer’ Found in Remote Forest

Ghosts, haints, swamp beasts, hobgoblins and the creepy dismembered ol’ farmer with the rusty pitchfork … they’re all part of deer camp lore.

Researchers found multiple sightings of the Kashmir musk deer during a 2008-09 search in Afghanistan, the first sighting in 60 years. (Photo: Wikipedia)

Researchers found multiple sightings of the Kashmir musk deer during a 2008-09 search in Afghanistan, the first sighting in 60 years. (Photo: Wikipedia)

Just like black panthers, which don’t exist either, the good ol’ ghost stories are fun to tell around the fire or lay on the newbie. Send him to the Creature Stand, and don’t wait too long after dark or you’ll find out what we mean!

Researchers have found a fanged deer in Afghanistan, though, that definitely would fit the prototype for a bloodthirsty Hollywood animal character. Thought to be extinct and not seen for six decades, they have discovered a handful of Kashmir musk deer in a remote portion of northeastern Afghanistan.

The male musk deer have fangs, which can grow to several inches in length and are used during the rut while fighting. With thick, shaggy coats to withstand the brutal winters, these unique deer are native to three areas: the Himalayas in northern India, the Kashmir region (hence, the name) of Pakistan and northern Afghanistan.

According to the report and this research report in the journal Oryx, researchers combed the rugged Nuristan province of Afghanistan in 2008-09 and had five sightings. That included a male, female and fawn.

The title of the Oryx report is “Musk deer Moschus cupreus persist in the eastern
forests of Afghanistan.”

They’re not whitetails, blacktail or mule deer. But this is pretty doggone cool.