Law Changed To Allow Hunters’ Donations To Help Others In Need

Remember this story from earlier this year about the idiotic actions of an official who ordered thousands of pounds of venison to be thrown away at a homeless shelter?

Donated venison, packaged like this for meals, through programs to help those in need is one way hunters help others each year.

Donated venison, packaged like this for meals, through programs to help those in need is one way hunters help others each year.

That won’t happen again because of some “that’s not proper” attitude after Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal signed legislation on Tuesday that will help with donations of venison from hunters. Jindal was at the Shreveport Rescue Mission for the official signing and glad-handing photo op.

More than 1,600 pounds of venison was ordered destroyed earlier this year after a health department official said it wasn’t properly handled or met standards. Despite the fact the donated venison had been enjoyed and donated for years in Shreveport and other cities in Louisiana, not to mention the Southeast, the official toed the company line due to a state law and ordered it destroyed, thus hurting those who benefitted from the hunters’ donations.

“The law prohibited that type of meat and fish game donations,” Jindal said Tuesday. “Because of the previous law, the deer meat was destroyed and removed from this mission, leaving less food for the hungry. This was one of those crazy situations that denied common sense.”

Senate Bill 58 was sponsored by Sen. Sherri Cheek Buffington and allows charities to receive game meat and fish to distribute for meals. Another bill, Senate Bill 84, sponsored by Sen. Neil Riser, provides for a $1 optional check-off donation for hunters and anglers when they purchase a license. The donations will be used for Hunters for the Hungry processing fees to help defray costs of processing and preparation of venison before donation to food banks.

“We have a bill that forever more, we can encourage our hunters to bring in their game, let it be processed and fed to those who desperately need it,” Commissioner of Agriculture Mike Strain said. “You don’t know need until you’re hungry, and I don’t mean being 30 minutes late for lunch.I mean desperately hungry with nowhere to turn.”

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