Three Payoffs to Scouting for Deer After the Season Ends

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The season is over for whitetail hunters across the country. Whether you let a crossbow arrow fly to put meat in the freezer or antlers on the ground doesn’t matter much any more.

Post-season scouting is the best time to find trails and bedding and feeding areas, so you can plan accordingly for next season.

Post-season scouting is the best time to find trails and bedding and feeding areas, so you can plan accordingly for next season.

But your work is far from over. In fact, it never really stops if you want to stack the odds in your favor to improve or continue to experience success when the 2017 archery season rolls around. Here are three things you should be doing this time of year:

  1. Put boots on the ground and do some heavy scouting. The branches are bare and leafy green foliage that might cover the forest floor is all but gone. If you’re lucky and live in the north, you’ll likely have snow on the ground, which is the icing on the cake for pristine scouting opportunities.
  2. Deer trails should be obviously apparent. Find a trail that is more matted than another and now you know where they prefer to walk. Follow those trails in one direction and you’re bound to come across one of two things: either a food source or a bedding area. Knowing about these is crucial to learning about the deer in your area and how they use the property you’re hunting. Bedding areas will also be readily visible if you have snow.
  3. Keep your eyes peeled for antlers! Bucks across the country have begun to shed their antlers. If you want another great way to keep inventory of the bucks using the property you hunt, finding their sheds is one very exciting way to do that.

Knowing about feeding, bedding and travel areas helps you to locate the perfect stand location. Now, you’re set up beautifully for when hunting season opens in autumn.

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