Editors Blog

Big Rubs: Are They the Superhighway to Big Bucks?

Dan Schmidt of Deer & Deer Hunting

The whitetail’s most visible rut-time signs also have spawned deep-rooted myths. Count, if you can, how many times you’ve heard someone say, “Small rubs always equal small deer. You have to find big rubs to find big deer.” What’s the count? Probably dozens, right? Unfortunately, that blanket statement is yet another whitetail myth.

Bucks rubs reveal clues that can help you during the season.

Bucks rubs reveal clues that can help you during the season.

Although big rubs are a good indicator a big deer is roaming the countryside, sign alone does not indicate if, or how many, big deer frequent a property. Well-developed yearlings and average-sized 2-year-old bucks can leave calf-sized rubs. These rubs, however, are usually sparse. Rub lines that feature consistently large rubs are good indicators you’re dealing with a mature buck.

LEARN MORE ABOUT RUBS AND HOW THESE SIGNPOSTS CAN HELP YOU

A mature big-woods buck I killed more than 15 years ago made nothing but small, sapling-sized rubs across his home territory. I knew the buck was there, and, frankly, was surprised by the lack of sign. I didn’t realize why until after I killed him. He weighed 245 pounds on the hoof and sported a Pope and Young-class rack. But his beam tips curved so far inward that they nearly touched. When he rubbed, he either had to choose a 2-inch sapling, or rub the trees with the sides of his rack.

Watch how a buck makes a rub in this DDH TV flashback:

Rubs certainly are exciting to a deer hunter. But they’re highly unreliable for forecasting buck movement unless they’re concentrated in a well-defined line in a classic travel corridor. Rubs basically tell you where a buck has been, and close study can reveal what direction he was traveling when he made them.

When hunting, let rubs confirm you’ve selected a good piece of terrain. Don’t make the mistake of merely placing a stand within shooting distance of a rub or two. Instead, dissect the area and key off of trails, corners and areas where dense cover overlaps with more open areas.

GET EXPERT ADVICE ABOUT RUBS AND WHITETAIL BEHAVIOR