Editors Blog

New Mathews Bows and Other Top Bowhunting Gear Picks

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What are the new Mathews bows for 2015, and how about 6 top picks for bowhunters? We got you covered in this bonus blog!

Mathews Archery just concluded its annual retailer show this week, and we got the opportunity to shoot the new bows (and crossbows) everyone is raving about.

In particular, the new Mathews No Cam is something to see … and shoot.

I had the chance to shoot both the No Cam HTR and the No Cam TRG, and must say these bows include some of the most impressive technology ever brought to the archery industry. Both have unique features, and both could be used for hunting. The HTR, however, is more of a hunting bow due to its shorter length (32 inches, as opposed to 38 inches for the TRG).

Mathews No Cam HTR

Mathews No Cam HTR

What’s cool about the No Cam is that it’s a bow that it has a completely integrated design. The limbs are shorter, and the riser is less reflexed. When you draw it back, it’s insanely smooth. You can literally pick up the bow — shoot a couple of arrows — and be dialed in and ready to go in minutes. There’s not much, if any, of a learning curve to these bows. I do know this: It is definitely the smoothest, most forgiving Mathews I’ve ever shot, and I’ve been shooting Mathews bows since 1999.

The No Cam HTR weighs just a smidge over 4 pounds — super lightweight. It also has so many options — everything from draw weight modules to let-off to colors — Mathews basically lets you build a bow that perfectly suits your styles.

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Mathews describes the new technology like this:  “Our revolutionary NO CAM ST™ Technology utilizes two circular and concentric string tracks, allowing the string to travel at a constant distance from the center of rotation during the shot cycle. This eliminates the common camming action on both top and bottom string tracks, creating a balanced and synchronized system with straight and level nock travel for superior accuracy.”

You can read more about it here, but I suggest just going to your local archery pro shop and shooting it for yourself.

I shot the new No Cam HTR bow at the Mathews test center in Wisconsin Dells this week. It had a new Steady Form system attached to the riser. Wow, talk about arrow-packing accuracy. Without having shot the bow previously (and not having it set up for me specifically) I put my first seven arrows into 2-inch circle at 20 yards. I cannot even imagine the downrange accuracy I will be able to achieve this coming winter and spring with a rig that’s set up for me. If you’re not familiar with the Steady Form, you have to check it out.

The Steady Form.

The Steady Form.

This thing is not a gimmick, it really works. It essentially provides an extra anchor point that helps you keep your bow rock solid before the shot. The result is perfect form that will make those 30-yard shots “money” and greatly assist in those longer-range shots. Several of my industry buddy’s say they are now practicing out to 80 yards with unbelievable accuracy. They, of course, won’t take shots at deer out at those ranges, but imagine what the 40- 50-yard shots feel like. One of my friends said a 50-yard shot to him now feels like what a 20-yard shot used to feel like — he said the Steady Form has made him ultra-confident in his archery shooting.

Again, shoot if for yourself. You’ll be impressed.

Deer & Deer Hunting Editor-in-Chief Dan Schmidt flings some arrows out of the new bows on display at this week's Mathews Archery retailer show in Wisconsin Dells, Wis.

Deer & Deer Hunting Editor-in-Chief Dan Schmidt flings some arrows out of the new bows on display at this week’s Mathews Archery retailer show in Wisconsin Dells, Wis.

A couple other new products for 2015 to check out:

Toxic Broadheads new practice point.

Toxic Broadheads new practice point.

1. Toxic Broadheads practice point. A lot of guys and gals have flocked to the Toxic Broadhead. And for good reason. It’s sharp, and it creates nasty-lethal wounds in deer. The broadhead’s curved-blade design creates wicked wound channels. Best of all, the broadhead is engineered to fly straight and true out of today’s fastest bows.

 

Venom XL Bow Sight.

Venom XL Bow Sight.

2. Venom XL bow sights from Viper Archery Products. This line of sights features eight different models. They are tool-less sights that are built to last and feature stainless steel Pro Pins. Also, the fiber runs directly through the pins for ultimate protection. The Venom XL pins are available in .010, .019, and .029 for your precision aiming needs.

DRT Broadheads.

DRT Broadheads.

3. DRT Broadheads from Dirt Nap Gear. Still on blood thinners due to my clot problems from earlier this fall, I had to be VERY careful when handling these broadheads. They are insanely sharp. If you know me, I love a sharp broadhead! Very interesting design here, plus they have models that anyone can use — even crossbow hunters who want a heavier head (special head available for 2015).

Decent price, too. $34.99 for three. A really good option for bowhunters who prefer a cut-on-contact broadhead.

Upwind Scent Elimination.

Upwind Scent Elimination.

4. Upwind Odor Elimination Products.  I talked with the owners of this company, and both come from outside the hunting industry. They just happen to be hunters, and they wanted to combine both passions when unveiling their science-based odor-elimination system. In short, these sprays are based on a proven patented copper ion technology developed to eliminate industrial strength odors found in the harshest working environments. The field spray, laundry detergent and body wash products all come with a 100 percent money-back guarantee. They are also labeled as non-toxic and biodegradable.

Lakewood Products Bow Case.

Lakewood Products Bow Case.

5. Lakewood Bow Cases and Accessories. Simply put, these are the cat’s pajamas. I’ve used one for several years and absolutely love it. Strong, lightweight and, best of all, airline approved. The construction on Lakewood cases is unsurpassed, and the drop-in design allows you to put the bow into the case with the quiver on. Accessory boxes for broadheads and other gear packed neatly into the case, allowing the case to double as a carry-all. I’ve even packed my clothes and other gear into this case while traveling. It helps eliminate the need for bringing extra bags to the airport.

6. HECS StealthScreen from Gamehide. By now you’ve probably seen the TV shows where hunters go hunting with HECS clothing and get unbelievably close to game. The premise behind this technology is that the clothing eliminates a person’s electrical energy field, making it impossible for animals to sense they are in danger. Pretty radical concept, huh? Well, it really seems to work. New for 2015, Gamehide is offering this technology in a number of hunting garments.

Here’s a video that helps explain it a little better:

Gamehide adds HECS technology to its clothing line. from Shiloh Outdoor Productions on Vimeo.

 

A very cool and unique ladder from Twisted Timber Treestands.

A very cool and unique ladder from Twisted Timber Treestands.

7. Twisted Timber Ladder. The photo says it all! This is an ingenious design. It’s going to allow hunters to hunt areas they never thought were possible. I, for one, know of a twisted stand of white oaks (damaged in high straight-line winds 20 years ago) where this ladder would be perfect for hunting deer when the acorns are dropping in September.