Editors Blog

Turkey Recipe Bonus: A Hawaiian Delight

There's nothing sweeter than a homegrown turkey (well, OK, venison is sweeter, but you get the idea).

There’s nothing sweeter than a homegrown turkey (well, OK, venison is sweeter, but you get the idea).

There’s a good reason why the founders of Deer & Deer Hunting expanded the brand in 1991 and started up Turkey & Turkey Hunting: There’s just too much great-tasting wild game out there to eat nothing but venison year-round (although most of us try!).

I had a hunt for the ages yesterday. In the morning, I missed (gasp!) my first gobbler in quite a few years. No good reason. I just whiffed on a 35-yard shot that should have been money (turkey breast) in the bank. It didn’t take long for redemption, as I scored on the same gobbler later in the afternoon. Fresh wild turkey is something to celebrate, for sure, but this one was so sweet. So, with that in mind, I asked my better half (Tracy) to use this occasion to treat our family to her world-famous Hawaiian Turkey Recipe. We use Dole pineapples that are grown in Hawaii because we think they taste better and because of our commitment to U.S. products.

We don’t hold any secrets in our house when it comes to good food. Tracy is more than willing to share this happy — and healthy — turkey recipe with everyone:

Yes, this IS as good as it looks. Be careful not to overcook it. Wild turkey gets tough when you leave it on high heat for too long. (photo courtesy of Tracy Schmidt)

Yes, this IS as good as it looks. Be careful not to overcook it. Wild turkey gets tough when you leave it on high heat for too long. (photo courtesy of Tracy Schmidt)

Ingredients:

A half or whole wild turkey breast, depending on size
1/4 cup fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon salt
1 dash black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
3/4 cup onions, chopped
1 teaspoon garlic, minced
1 tablespoon fresh lime zest
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 (20-ounce) can crushed pineapple in juice

Instructions:

The secret here is that the acid in the pineapple helps tenderize and moisten the wild turkey meat. The lime rind gives it a little zing that goes well with the thyme. To get more juice out of a lime, I pop it into the microwave for 15-20 seconds and roll it on the cutting board before I juice it. That way I can get enough juice for this recipe out of a single lime.

Cut the turkey breast into portions. Rub the pieces with lime juice, then salt and pepper them. Heat oil in skillet, brown the turkey and transfer it to a plate. Add the onion and garlic to the skillet until soft but not browned. Return the turkey to the skillet along with any juices and simmer, covered, over low heat for 20 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add the lime zest, pineapple with juice and thyme to the skillet. Turn the turkey portions to coat them and cook uncovered for another 10 minutes, making sure the final temperature reaches 165°F.

Serve on platter and top it with some extra pineapple-lime sauce.