Burmese Python, Skip Snow, Mark Parry, Deer

In this Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 photo provided by the National Park Service, Everglades National Park wildlife biologists Mark Parry, left, and Skip Snow perform a necropsy on a Burmese Python that was captured and killed in Everglades National Park, Fla. The 15.65-foot-long Python had recently consumed a 76-lb. adult female deer. The reptile was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. (Courtesy Laurie Oberholtzer/National Park Service)

In this Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 photo provided by the National Park Service, Everglades National Park wildlife biologists Mark Parry, left, and Skip Snow perform a necropsy on a Burmese Python that was captured and killed in Everglades National Park, Fla. The 15.65-foot-long Python had recently consumed a 76-lb. adult female deer. The reptile was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. (Courtesy Laurie Oberholtzer/National Park Service)

In this Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 photo provided by the National Park Service, Everglades National Park wildlife biologists Mark Parry, left, and Skip Snow perform a necropsy on a Burmese Python that was captured and killed in Everglades National Park, Fla. The 15.65-foot-long Python had recently consumed a 76-lb. adult female deer. The reptile was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. (Courtesy Laurie Oberholtzer/National Park Service)

One thought on “Burmese Python, Skip Snow, Mark Parry, Deer

  1. superfluities

    I seroiusly doubt the whole SE is in danger from pythons. Even on just 30-40 degree low nights their found dead on the asphalt from trying to get warm. Anything north of the everglades and established population would be very rare. They are a real problem which is why there has been Florida python hunting seasons which require the special python hunting stamp! There is also a TV reality show about everglades python hunting.

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