Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and Wilderness Hunter

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ranwin33
 
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Location: Kansas and Missouri

Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and Wilderness Hunter

Postby ranwin33 » Thu Jun 18, 2009 10:32 am

Just started reading (for the second time) Teddy Roosevelt's Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and Wilderness Hunter.  And it's just as good the second time through.  It provides an interesting look at hunting and attitudes of the late 1800's (how things have changed).  While the prose at times certainly dates the writing, I think it also adds a bit of flavor not common in so many of today's books.  I particularly like how he devotes entire chapters to a certain species of wild game, and describes how he hunted the animals.  The descriptions of how the game taste really drives home the "why" of why people hunted back then.  Plus, the book gives the reader a look into Teddy Roosevelt's thinking and behaviors which do not always align with the man as he is portrayed today.  All-in-all a very good read for people interested in hunting stories from the past.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold

DeanoZ
 
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RE: Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and Wilderness Hunter

Postby DeanoZ » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:59 am

I'll have to check our local library for it or pick up a copy, but I'd be interested to know if in it he discussed or touched upon scent control, hunting the wind, cover and concealment, baiting, still versus stand hunting, etc?  We get into some deep and emotional discussion here about some of these subjects and I often wonder how much of a difference it really does make?

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ranwin33
 
Posts: 2110
Joined: Sun May 04, 2008 2:12 pm
Location: Kansas and Missouri

RE: Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and Wilderness Hunter

Postby ranwin33 » Mon Jul 06, 2009 8:14 am

He talks about all of those things.  This is my second time through the book, and I have to kind of smile when he talks about these things because it brings up thoughts of posts here on the forum.  Also, it is interesting to read that T.R.'s views on many of these subjects mirror our own.  I guess even a hundred years doesn't change some things.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold


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