Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

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Bryan78
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Bryan78 » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:33 pm

I have no problem with using a crossbow or allowing people to use crossbows for hunting as long as it is legal in the state that you live in.

Bowtechian
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Bowtechian » Fri Jun 04, 2010 3:10 pm

I don't have a problem with crossbows being used during archery season even though I have no desire to own or even shoot one. The concern I have is the people who buy them for hunting with a false sense of what they can do. Like Marc said, I think the only advantage they have over my verticle bow is you don't have to let down if the animal takes it's time presenting you with an ethical shot. Shot distance should be considered the same as a compound bow, if not less, due to the bolt losing energy & stability quicker than an arrow.
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Ifishandhunt
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Ifishandhunt » Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:40 pm

Marc,
When I wrote that I had to knock an arrow, I meant after I shot and missed the first time. When I use my compound bow I always have an arrow knocked well before the deer comes in sight, that's just common sense to me.

I will agree holding the draw on a compound bow a long time is tough and so is the back draw. Though Crossbows (at least the Ten Point I've used and others I have held in the stores) are not light by any means.

Anyway, my point was that you have one chance with the crossbow, whereas the compound you may be able to knock another arrow without spooking the deer if you missed the first shot. And I have done that on more than one occasion [8|]. To me the Crossbow isn't like other guns except for a muzzleloader in the sense that you only get one shot. With other guns you are allowed multiple rounds (ie: shotguns-allowed 3 shells in your magazine in Ohio). Of course you don't get near the distance on a crossbow that you get with a muzzleloader. So in my opinion, there are advantages and disadvantages in both verticle bows and crossbows.

Bowtechian, I am not so sure about shot distance/energy being the same for compound and a crossbow. When I take both bows to the range, and shoot the same distances, the bolt from the crossbow gets burried into the targets up to and sometimes including the fletching . Whereas the arrows shot from my compound bow don't even penetrate the targets halfway. I have much more confidence and personal experience that the crossbow shoots farther out than my compound bow. I wouldn't take a 50 yard shot with my compound, but I do it with the crossbow no problem. So I guess there is another advantage of a crossbow over a compound.

I hunt for the meat and to feed my family. I have no regrets using a crossbow a few times a year but it doesn't mean I am any less a hunter. As long as it's legal, to each his own. I know guys who only hunt during gun week. It doesn't make them any less of a hunter because they don't bow hunt.

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JPH
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby JPH » Sat Jun 05, 2010 12:26 am

ORIGINAL: Ifishandhunt

I hunt for the meat and to feed my family. I have no regrets using a crossbow a few times a year but it doesn't mean I am any less a hunter. As long as it's legal, to each his own. I know guys who only hunt during gun week. It doesn't make them any less of a hunter because they don't bow hunt.


I won't argue with that. ^

I hope to make it very clear that in places where hunters can now legally use crossbows during archery season, those hunters have my full support. In my state of residence (Iowa) we can only use shotguns or MLs during the regular gun season. In the state where I own property (Missouri) we can use center fire rifles. I see no reason to change either state because the laws are working for the hunting population in both places. I feel the same way about crossbows.

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Woods Walker » Sat Jun 05, 2010 1:23 am

Since a crossbow is much easier to use and should have a higher kill rate, I think there should be a separate season for them ( and a much shorter season at that).


Since a COMPOUND is much easier to use and should (does) have a higher kill rate, I think that there should be a separate season for them (and a much shorter season at that).

Drawing down on a deer is where most (if not all) of the trouble starts with a bow. I would guess 90% of failed bow hunts begin with the deer seeing movement from the hunter drawing down.


So I would assume then that you are also against the use of shoot through tent blinds during archery season also? The deer can't see you draw while you're in them either.

JPH [quote]What I would rather not see is a movement toward flooding the woods with hunters during the bow season as it is now.[quote]

I understand your thoughts, but just like the opponents to concealed carry, "It'll be like the old west! Shootouts at traffic lights and parking lots!!!", this has NOT happened in all the states that have made them legal. Where this DID happen was with the advent of the compound bow!

Just for the record, here's my answer to Dan's question........YES!  Crossbows, like "real" bows, use energy stored in the limbs to propel a stick that's tipped with a piece of sharpened steel that kills via shock caused by massive blood loss, and it doesn't go "BOOM".
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

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Marc Anthony
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Marc Anthony » Sat Jun 05, 2010 5:49 am

ORIGINAL: Woods Walker

Since a crossbow is much easier to use and should have a higher kill rate, I think there should be a separate season for them ( and a much shorter season at that).


Since a COMPOUND is much easier to use and should (does) have a higher kill rate, I think that there should be a separate season for them (and a much shorter season at that).

Drawing down on a deer is where most (if not all) of the trouble starts with a bow. I would guess 90% of failed bow hunts begin with the deer seeing movement from the hunter drawing down.


So I would assume then that you are also against the use of shoot through tent blinds during archery season also? The deer can't see you draw while you're in them either.

JPH [quote]What I would rather not see is a movement toward flooding the woods with hunters during the bow season as it is now.[quote]

First and foremost, never anywhere did I say the word "against". Lets be clear on that. To answer your question, no, I'm not against shoot through ground blinds. If a person wants to use a shoot through blind, go for it! Yes, you are concealing the draw but you are also adding stronger human scent to the equation by hunting on the ground. I personally don't think a shoot through offers that much of an advantage because of the fact that you are not mobile. You have no panoramic view and you are limited to what ever happens to walk in front of you. A tree stand offers more of an opportunity for a kill, unless you are hunting in an open area from the ground. Not to get off subject here, lets look at apples and apples here.

To answer your question, a compound does offer a greater advantage compared to a recurve. You are not comparing the same issues here. Both a recurve and a compound require you to draw seconds before your target gets into range and a cross bow does not. So you may have one whole minute of holding a compound at full draw compared to a fourth of that time with a recurve. Bottom line: Neither gives you the advantage of being fully drawn all of the time. I have hunted the state of Ohio, with friends, where cross bows have been legal for decades and have seen deer walk in front of their stands offering many opportunities that I didn't have. Lets face it, you don't have to believe my opinion but if the individuals states didn't think the same way, every state would have a cross bow season!

Just for the record, I am not against it as previously mentioned, I just think there needs to be some tweaking with the rules. With regard to JPH's statement of "I am afraid that liberalized crossbow laws would lead to hunters who have avoided bow season up to now because they were unwilling or unable to develop the needed skills." , I think that it makes it very clear that it is easier thus requires less from the hunter.
"A fool learns from his own mistake but a wiseman learns from a fool's mistake "

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JPH
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby JPH » Sat Jun 05, 2010 6:44 am

Okay, I'm getting a little lost in the "quote boxes". I'm almost sorry I offerd my opinion. But now that I have, I think I need to make my position more clear.

I think I need to explain the meaning behind this, "What I would rather not see is a movement toward flooding the woods with hunters during the bow season as it is now. One of the things that attracts me to bow season is that it is quiet and unpressurized. I am afraid that liberalized crossbow laws would lead to hunters who have avoided bow season up to now because they were unwilling or unable to develop the needed skills."

I am very happy with the long, uncrowded and unpressured bow season we have in Iowa and Missouri. In my opinion, the season is the way it is because there is a certain "price of admission". In order to participate an individual must take the time to develop at least basic archery skills. I have first hand experience with crossbows and they do not require the same degree of skill to operate. My theory is that once basic archery skill is no longer required, we could see an influx of hunters and an unfortunate change in the nature of bow season. I am not making any judgement regarding who is more of a hunter. The ability to shoot a bow makes one an archer, not a hunter.

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badtoys
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby badtoys » Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:55 pm

i agree with Ifishandhunt     except this is wrong!!   ( One advantage crossbow does have is that you can probably get an opportunity to shoot a deer with it at maybe 20 yards further than you would a compound bow. wrong!!)  i have a mathews my girlfriend has a tenpoint both the best bows on the market i can out shoot her by 30 yards hers is 50yrds she has tried 60 but not to accurate not enough to shoot at something  mine is 80 not that i would ever shoot that far but i do have a pin for that.with a pep sight i could never go over 40 - 50 i put the pep elimator on my bow now i can do 80 it's great i have nothing to do with this site just my opnion, check it out http://www.peepeliminator.com/
WARNING: The lead contained in this bullet has been known to cause severe injury and even death. when travelling at over 2100 feet per second.Surgeon General's Warning: Getting smoked by one of these bullets may behazardous to your health.

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Woods Walker » Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:27 am

I looked at a crossbow one time at a Bass Pro Shop. I began to have urges to rob, rape, and kill.....and to convince all my buddies to do the same!  They're bad I tell ya....bad! [&:]
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

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Dan Salmon
 
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RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Crossbows

Postby Dan Salmon » Sun Jun 06, 2010 6:07 am

So, If I'm summarizing correctly, what it comes down to is, we want more hunters and hunter opportunity, but we don't want it to marginalize our hunting experiences. 

In essence, yes, but not in my backyard.  Maybe we should just call a spade a spade and say we don't want new hunters because it's allowing our hunting to be much better without them.

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