CHOOSING RIFLES

Talk about the best guns and ammunition for deer hunting!
jyeomans
 
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CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby jyeomans » Mon Apr 13, 2009 12:36 am

I have made up my mind on a new rifle in a bolt action .308. I would like some opinions on either a new browning x bolt, or the new winchester model 70 lightweight, they are about the same price, also a good scope for it. I hunt mostly ME & NH. I would appreciate any opinions on this. Thankyou John

CB on the run
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby CB on the run » Mon Apr 13, 2009 2:14 am

  I'm a fan of the .308, have & hunt with one now, owned several and shot many.  If you strickly hunt for deer I wouldn't discount the 7mm-08, it's a great deer round and all guns I've deal with have been very accurate.  I don't not currently own one but that's mainly due to our uncertain economy.  I'm a big Browning fan  BUT  I've seen some quality control issues.  My good friend has a 25 WSM in their micro hunter, a beautiful gun.  We have played with that gun, changed scopes, tried every factory load, handloaded etc.  It will put two shots w/in an inch and throws the third 4-6" away.  I thought it was him and since I'm a 25 caliber fan offered to buy the gun but I decided to have a gunsmith check it first.  Turns out that the rifling at the end of the barrel has a serious defect.  The gunsmith thought that he could correct it but the gun would have to lose some barrel length.  This model already has a short barrel for the velocity of the caliber it's chambered for so I wasn't willing plus I have a habit of getting bored with guns and an alteration like this would de-value it.  A second gun in the same model but different caliber shot like a dream but for no apparent reason the stock cracked.  This one was less than 1 1/2 yrs old so it went back.  8 long months and several phones calls later it was shipped back with a new stock.
  I know little about Winchesters except I don't like 3 position wing safeties.
  Tinka makes a great gun and they're reasonably priced and I believe they're affliated with Sako which is a quality product.  The Tinkas' I come into contact with have all been good shooters.
  I'm surprised you're not considering a Remington pump, isn't that Benoit country?
 
Charlie Belle

coach
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby coach » Thu Apr 16, 2009 3:08 pm

jyeomans,
 
depends what you hunt.  If it merely only deer, then 308 is awesome.
30-06,  308, 270, shotgun, 30-30,  and more....these are guns that you don't
have to worry.
The brand of the rifle is purely  preferences.
Remington, Browning, Winchester.... to me...its all the same.  Of course if we talk quality in wood and....stuff like that...then they say get a Browning or whatever.
 
But seriously....you want your 150 or 165 grain bullet to find a quarter at 100 yrds.
I do that with my 18.5 inch barrel, 30-06 Remington pump that was bought in 1974.  Still looks new.
 
If you can do the same with a bolt action,  gold plated, octagon barrell 7000 $ rifle...then you do the same job as me.
 
All that to say...its all about you.  What makes you feel good. In your head and in your hand and in your wallet.
 
 Whatever you buy...i'm sure it will a good choice.
Good luck and let us know.
 
Cheers
Ottawa, Ontario

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PrairieShadow
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby PrairieShadow » Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:17 am

The new browning and the new winchester are both great guns. They are both made by browning and have the same triggers in each.
 
Get whichever one you like better, your not gunna go wrong with either.
Hunting isn't a matter of Life or Death
Its MUCH more important than that!

wack
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby wack » Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:01 am

I'd choose one that's made in the USA. Browning is an American name, but last I checked, they were not made in USA. I'd think Winchester is made in USA but I wouldn't bet money on it the way things have been going. No doubts that Browning has good quality, but we need to stick with gun makers who provide American jobs and reward them for not selling American workers out. I'd even buy a Canadian made firearm before I get one from across the big pond. Just my 2 cents worth.
American by birth, hunter by choice.

jyeomans
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby jyeomans » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:37 am

Hi coach, I have a 30-06 pump also, I use 180 grain corelocks & it really kicks,if I go to 150 or 160, would the kick be as bad. Is 150grain efficient for deer. They can get big in NH-MAINE. Thanks for the information. John 

CB on the run
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby CB on the run » Wed Apr 22, 2009 6:50 am

I have the Remington 760 in the 308.  It is an older gun and came without a recoil pad.  They do kick a bit.  I had my gunsmith cut the stock and attach a nice cushy recoil pad which helped a lot.  Remington also sells reduced recoil rounds that perform almost identical to standard ammo out to 200 yards which may help.   If you gun will shoot the 150 grain rounds that will reduce the felt recoil somewhat also.
 
Charlie Belle   

wack
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby wack » Thu Apr 23, 2009 5:42 am

jyeomans, 2 things I would do to your gun to reduce the felt recoil. First as mentioned, a better recoil pad. There are a few real good ones on the market, I really like the Limbsaver pads and the customer service that goes along with finding the correct pad for your rifle. The recoil pads usually run about $50. The pad by itself will really help, but if your stock doesn't fit you properly then you should have the stock fitted to you prior to buying the pad, as cutting the stock will change the size and shape pad you need. Finding a premade pad is the cheapest option, custom fitting a pad get's a little mor expensive. This is where Sims Limbsaver customer service is most valuable.

 The 2nd thing I'd do is install a mercury kick suppressor in the stock of your gun. The brand I use is BreakO. They come in different sizes to fit different stock bolt holes. By removing the recoil pad, you can measure the bolt hole diameter and depth. You get the largest one that will fit in the stock bolt hole, wrap the suppressor with tape to create a very snug fit. Then you cut a wooden dowel the size of the hole, cut it flush or a little lower than flush with the stock, drill a hole through the dowel on an angle so as not to hit the suppressor, screw the dowel into the stock (on an angle from the end of the dowel, out the side of the dowel, into the stock) so the suppressor can not move the length of the hole. The suppressor is now mounted solidly in the hole so it can not move in any direction, put the recoil pad back on, you're ready to shoot. The BreakO also is about $50 if you install it yourself.

 I did both to my 3.5" 12 ga Mossberg 835 and it makes the gun much easier to point because of the added weight in the stock and now I can shoot it with out getting hurt. Between the two, the BreakO takes away, deadens some of the kick, the pad cushions the kick, a muzzle break redirects gas pressure to counter act the kick.

 Your 3rd option is a little more expensive. Have a muzzle break installed on the barrel. This will make your gun kick and jump less but also make your gun much louder to the shooter. Probably about $100 or more.

 The last option is to get rid of that gun and caliber and go to a caliber that's more shooter friendly. 7mm08, 30-30, 243, there are a lot of options to choose from. You'll be much happier and a better shooter with a gun you can handle. Low recoil ammo? Kind of like buying a Porsche with a VW Bug motor in it. It just ain't right. lol You choose your bullet weight and shape by the animal you intend to hunt, if you are choosing you bullet weight and shape for felt recoil, you are shooting the wrong caliber. Bullet weight makes very little difference in felt recoil. The energy comes from the gun powder, not the bullet. If you can tame your gun so it's comfortable to shoot, great, if not, I'd get a different gun.
American by birth, hunter by choice.

GTOHunter
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby GTOHunter » Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:37 pm

I use the new Shells/Ammo from Remington called "Managed Recoil".Only issue to that would be you may need to buy a Rifle in a Bolt Action or Lever Action because the ammo has less gun powder so it may not operate some gas powered or automatic rifles and won't eject the shell properly?I bought a used Remington 30-06 Bolt Action Rifle and went with the managed recoil shells that come in 125 grain which should be plenty heavy for killing a Deer.You need to check and see what other calibers their shells come in before purchasing a certain gun.I also have a Browning .243 Bolt Action Rifle (100 grain Hornady Custom Shells) and have harvested many Deer with it including 2 nice size 8-Point Bucks over the past 4 years. 

lonlon
 
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RE: CHOOSING RIFLES

Postby lonlon » Thu Apr 30, 2009 3:57 pm

T/C is made in the States. Hard to beat the T/C Pro Hunter, pick whatever barrel you want to put on it. I took 3 whitetail  last fall with the 12 gauge slug barrel, two deer were over 100 yards, would be a great close in brush choice, I shoot Hornady sabots. also took one deer with the 50 Cal muzzle barrel and a goat and a mule deer in Wy with a 270 barrel, Goat at 175, mule deer at 250 yards, I have Nikon scopes on all 3 barrels, nice scope and won't break the bank, only gun you will need in your collection? Life is good, enjoy,eh?

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