What's your best?

Your place to discuss ways the habitats for deer can be improved!
scottflesher
 
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Location: SE Ohio

RE: What's your best?

Postby scottflesher » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:44 pm

My experience has been variety. I agree Soybeans seem to have the best protein value and if avaliable during the late late fall and early spring, seem to improve antler growth. However it's also important to have carbohydrates during the winter to sustain body mass and improve the odds of survival.

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Goose
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby Goose » Fri Jun 04, 2010 4:16 pm

As you can see, there are many options and each scenario is different.

I love soybeans for the following reasons:
-Great protein source during lactation and antler growing phases
-Its a great scouting plot in July/August
-It provides carbs in the winter with the beans and can be a late season magnet
-It stands off of the ground, so when we get snow it is still pretty easy to get at for the deer
-Drought tolerant for our sandy loam soil
-Comes Round-up Ready
-Fairly cheap, we paid $20 per 50 lb bag from a farmer this year
-Handles grazing once established
-Supplies a good amount of tonnage per acre

During late Sept and early Oct. the deer will look for better food because a cell wall compound called lignin-- which makes the plant sturdier to support the heavier plant--is harder for them to digest. They will return for the beans though. In our area, there is no other crops real close, so they seem to stick around better, however, I have also seen them stick around or show themselves more in agricultural areas when the plot is secluded.


As you can see, it will vary from property to property. In some areas they will destroy brassicas in others they wont touch it, in some areas they will hammer chicory, in others they wont touch it etc...
Variety is best, you don't want to "clean their plate" where at some point in the year they have nothing to eat. If you have variety they will have something all year long to keep them healthy and recover from events like the rut,winter, and fawn rearing.

Clover is also a great choice any where you go, I believe it takes up the most acreage in food plots. Its long lasting, fairly easy to maintain, and supplies a good food source for most of the year. A good mix is fall planted clover with winter rye or wheat as a nurse or cover crop.

BH21- As a forage variety bean, do they grow bean pods?
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

whtail101
 
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Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 8:16 am

RE: What's your best?

Postby whtail101 » Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:38 am

I just put in 3 acres of Eagle Forage Soybeans...  For the Same reasons Buckhunter 21 mentioned in his post.  This is my first time with these beans so I could keep you posted on how they do this summer.  They came up great and the deer are starting to hit them.  Plants are only about 6" tall right now with 3 weeks growth.  Goose.... from what I am told, these beans will produce pods.  Not a lot, but some.  For some reason 10-20 bushels an acre sticks in my head.  Thats what I believe my local retailer told me.

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Goose
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby Goose » Tue Jun 08, 2010 6:08 am

Thanks! I look forward to hearing your experiences with them! Let us know the progress and don't be afraid to post some pics!
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

whtail101
 
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Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2009 8:16 am

RE: What's your best?

Postby whtail101 » Tue Jun 08, 2010 8:10 am

Here are a couple of pics of the Eagle Forage Bean plots.  Only about week and half growth when pics were taken.  Will keep updated with trail cam pics.

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Blazed
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby Blazed » Wed Jun 09, 2010 4:24 am

When's the latest the beans can be put in? Can they be fall planted? I'm wondering if they would be tender then during early bow season.
I planted peas and clover in one sandy (but improving) plot and the peas did fine, but the clover burned off with a long dry spell right after they sprouted. So I'm thinking of beans in the peas. Peas were row planted.

Another question. How long do cow peas live? My spap peas in the garden don't make it past July4.

whtail101
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby whtail101 » Wed Jun 09, 2010 11:43 am

I wouldnt plant beans in the fall. Beans are awesome throughout the summer and early fall... as soon as you get a freeze.... they brown up. The deer will love them no matter what as long as they are green. In the winter they will eat the leftover seeds. That being said, might as well plant in spring and give them something to eat all summer. If planted in the fall, they also may not mature enough before a frost to get decent pods. Some beans are designed to have a certain growing period as well... some will start browning up earlier for harvest. Eagle beans do not do this. They will stay green until a freeze. Do not have any experience with peas. I'm not an expert by any means, just going off of past experiences. Hope this helped.

Blazed
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby Blazed » Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:11 am

Hey thanks. I did not realize that they would eat them all suumer. I would have basically wasted those beans by holding on to them until fall. Now I know I should get them out there now. Looks like I need to clear my weekend.

kevjack6
 
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RE: What's your best?

Postby kevjack6 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:48 am

As you've seen, ask 10 different people and you'll get 10 different answers! I think it really depends on many factors...time of year, geographic location, soil types, the time and money you have to invest, the type of equipment you have, etc.

Where I live in Northern Vt., there aren't many farms so you can pretty much plant anything with modest success. For early bow season, right up until the first couple of hard frosts, I have very good luck with white clover. I also like the fact that with some good maintenance practices, the plot will last many years.

For late season, though, nothing beats brassicas where I live. On my property, the deer start eating them about half-way through bow season (mid Oct) but they absolutely hammer them once the snow comes which is typically ideal for our rifle and then muzzleloader season. I've used both Shot Plot and Wintergreens with my preference being the Wintergreens.

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