Hinge Cutting

Your place to discuss ways the habitats for deer can be improved!
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ranwin33
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby ranwin33 » Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:33 am

The other nice thing about hinge cutting is that even if the tree dies you are still creating some cover for wildlife and protection for other plants that might normally be grazed and not have a chance to grow.  When we edged one of our fields by downing trees and leaving them in place, it suddenly became a very popular area for our local deer herd.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold

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FlDeerman
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby FlDeerman » Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:05 pm

Great idea!I'll try it .

Demoderby4
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby Demoderby4 » Sat Dec 13, 2008 5:12 pm

I'm definitely doing it this year, its a great idea!Ii cant wait to see how this and the new plots were putting in make a difference in the next few years!

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JPH
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby JPH » Sun Dec 14, 2008 3:39 am

I did a few hinge cuts yesterday. I have some areas where you can see my cabin from the road in winter. I hinge cut some trees along those lanes in hopes that it will be a little harder to see this time next year. It may have been a bit early. We'll see.

More hinge cuts, deeper in the woods, in February or March.

msbadger
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby msbadger » Mon Dec 15, 2008 9:36 am

I hing cut all the trees I want to get rid of in the month of feb. inorder to give deer needed browse...it usually kills them ...in later spring I cut ones I don't want but want to reprout about 4ft off the ground above a bud spur...these trees regrow branches which I trim into head high leaf browse shrubs.....these I do close to stands ...giving the appearance of less disturbance while opening up shooting lanes and areas of sun light....the deer don't have to look up to feed and it stops them for shots....best with ash...maple...beech

bmt4413
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby bmt4413 » Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:15 pm

Hinge cuts work well on species like maple.  Deer love to browse on tender shoots, leaves, and in the winter especially the buds.  The buds are packed with nutirtion and energy, which is important in the winter months when food is scarce and deer are recovering from the pressures of the rut.  Last winter (January) I was working on a property for a couple days, and I layed down a few red maple on the first day.  The next morning the swollen buds that were there the day before were gone and there were tracks in the snow everywhere.  Hard frosts in the early spring when the leaves are just starting to pop out can knock off the tender new shoots.  Usually trees push a new set, but the deer can reduce the chances if they browse hard.

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ranwin33
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby ranwin33 » Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:03 am

ORIGINAL: JPH

I did a few hinge cuts yesterday. I have some areas where you can see my cabin from the road in winter. I hinge cut some trees along those lanes in hopes that it will be a little harder to see this time next year. It may have been a bit early. We'll see.

More hinge cuts, deeper in the woods, in February or March.

Let me know if the cut trees come back in the spring.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold

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ranwin33
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby ranwin33 » Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:08 am

ORIGINAL: msbadger

I hing cut all the trees I want to get rid of in the month of feb. inorder to give deer needed browse...it usually kills them ...in later spring I cut ones I don't want but want to reprout about 4ft off the ground above a bud spur...these trees regrow branches which I trim into head high leaf browse shrubs.....these I do close to stands ...giving the appearance of less disturbance while opening up shooting lanes and areas of sun light....the deer don't have to look up to feed and it stops them for shots....best with ash...maple...beech

I was considering this as well - I noticed trees we cut but don't Tordon tended to come back eventually with multiple sprouts, kind of like a shrub.  So you think the deer hit these pretty well?  Might be interesting to keep them trimmed up like shrubs and see what happens - but not sure how much the deer like hickory leaves which seems to be about 90% of what we've got.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold

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EatDeer
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby EatDeer » Wed Dec 17, 2008 5:32 am

ORIGINAL: ranwin33

ORIGINAL: paulie

what exactly do you mean by "hinge cutting"? I'm just curious, I've never heard this term before.

Hinge cutting is when a tree is cut part way through and layed over onto the ground.  The hope is that it will continue to live and sprout leaves for several more years providing food and cover for deer and other wildlife while it does so. 

I've had good luck with cedars, but not so good luck with hardwoods.  But I'll keep trying, I've got an area just off our New Plot that I plan to hit this year, but I think I'll wait until late April or early May.
 When you hinge cut your going to lose a few trees. I like to cut all the way through instead, that way there is much more of a chance for the tree's to re-sprout in the spring.  
"Let a young buck go, so he can grow."

allthingshunting
 
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RE: Hinge Cutting

Postby allthingshunting » Wed Jan 21, 2009 1:31 am

How do you make the hinge cut iteslf?  I am very familiar with cutting down trees, i sell firewood as a side job... but how is a hinge cut best applied?  Do i make a wedge cut and start my backcut only going as far as necessary to make the tree fall, thus hopefully keeping the tree "attached" to its root system?  Many times the tree won't fall until it is pretty much no longer attached.  Should there be no wedge cut, just cut it so it falls the way it is leaning (i don't like making a cut like this, causes splitting and other unsafe scenarios).
 
The new sprouts most of you refer to, are they coming from the newly exposed stump area (i.e. now you have a tight cluster of saplings originating from the stump) or are you trying to get offshoots from the downed tree itself (i.e. new vertical shoots off of the now horizontal tree?)  I have seen both of these occur naturally, just curious as to which scenario this cutting is supposed to create. (maybe both)
 
maybe the best help would be an article with some pictures?  anyone know of any?  I will take any advice / instruction that one can offer.
 
I thank you in advance.

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