food plots in poor soil

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rudy1969
 
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food plots in poor soil

Postby rudy1969 » Fri Aug 20, 2010 8:20 am

I live in Southern Indiana and have old strip mine ground. The soil is very well drained and mostly clay. I had the soil tested and added the recommended nutrients and planted brassica, oats and peas. None of them really grew well. Anyone have any ideas on plants that would work in my soil?

msbadger
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby msbadger » Mon Aug 23, 2010 11:13 pm

for a spring summer planting I swear by buckwheat...deer and turkey here love it....helps suppress weeds and the roots break up the soil....very easy to disc in ...any frost will kill it down fast it is a good soil builder....does well in poor soils...also gives you a food source while the lime is improving your soil for other plants...because it takes time for lime to work.....Good luck...Good hunting

impeach O
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby impeach O » Tue Dec 28, 2010 9:24 pm

I would plant clover. clay can be hard and clover has shallow root system spreading by stollens 
my greatest fear in life is when I die my wife will sell my hunting equipment for what she thinks I spent

SolocamXtreme
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby SolocamXtreme » Mon Jan 10, 2011 3:16 pm

nope nope nope. you want to know why. you didnt fertilize the food plots. I had that happen to me when i first exprimented it. ill give you a tip. ex a 1 acre field. buy a 2acre worth of clover like whitetail institutes. get a atv or tractor to disc the fields first. then spread the seeds all over the 1 acre field. use a atv or tractor to cultipack the seeds to germinate. use 0-20-20 fertilizer or 19-19-19. they said 300 lbs. id recomend 100lbs. youll kill the clover with 300lbs. in the summer you need a mower to chop down the clover so that the clover can regrow young and lushy for the deer.

bmstaaf
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby bmstaaf » Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:36 pm

No matter what I will tell you this your going to need literally a "ton" of lime with as mentioned before a lot of fertilizer. We have a camp in pa where they use to drill for petroleum and oil we use at least 2 tons of fertilizer for 5 acres. Ground is clay with minimal nutrients. Each year the amount of lime needed decreases but not by a whole lot. I have one word that sums it up "expensive". If your willing to put time and money you won't be disappointed poor soil means in a lot of cases hard winters for the animals the root systems are not as strong so frost tends to kill a lot of the undergrowth. Where my house is the deer hardly touch my plots when winter arrives at camp in the winter deer are on the plots all day everyday its unreal. Good luck let us know how it goes.

bmstaaf
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby bmstaaf » Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:43 pm

I have tried plows and disks on atv's on the camp clay soil, you need a tractor with power hydrolics to push down. At home atv disks work fine but clay won't turn and an atv disk with 200 plus pounds still does not do the trick. This info is all personal experience with clay. It sucks get a lot of help!

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jonny5buck
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby jonny5buck » Wed Jan 19, 2011 9:55 pm

Im gonna go one step further and ask ''is it really really gonna help that spot? Farmers plant on good ground for a reason.I have learned much on trial and error with food plots.There is limited bonus to planting in the wrong spot,poor soil,and the wrong seed.I would take a serious assesment of what you hope to gain and what you will gain before going further.Sometimes a plot is not the answer at all.

PastorZig
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby PastorZig » Fri Jan 28, 2011 11:41 pm

ORIGINAL: rudy1969

I live in Southern Indiana and have old strip mine ground. The soil is very well drained and mostly clay. I had the soil tested and added the recommended nutrients and planted brassica, oats and peas. None of them really grew well. Anyone have any ideas on plants that would work in my soil?


I live and hunt in Southern Indiana as well and I know what you mean when you say old strip mine ground. My soil has been turned, tilled, and disced over a several year span..... fertilized/limed and seeded. One particular plot I have put bag after bag after bag of pelletized lime on and fertilizer, the best thing that grows there is.........weeds!!! That's right! Weeds! Clovers, alfalfas, and even Whitetail Institute's Extreme seed.... they all came up and looked great, but when the rains stopped in July or August----gone!!! The soil does not grow good shallow root crops and alfalfa doesn't have time to put down good root! Have I given up? No! But the pockets are getting lighter!!!

boxcallkid
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby boxcallkid » Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:32 am

I don't know if this has ever been mentioned before, if it has I'll apologize for boring you. I recently encountered a situation very similar to yours. My uncle wanted to put in a couple of food plots, and his choices were very limited. The one area was heavy clay with decades of compaction.
I suggested after we prepped the site we use polymers, he didn't have a clue what I was talking about and looked at me real funny. To make a long story short I ended up buying them for the plot. I opted for the ones that were pre fertilized and last appx ten years!
I love these wonders of science, and his Imperial clover patch was beautiful! I might add also that during the heat and drought of Michigans August it continued to grow thick and green requiring a good mowing.
If your interested in looking for yourself I believe you can find this at www.terawet.com Just the polymers themselves are good subject for conversation. Good luck with your plot. I found the leftover package in the garage this afternoon. We used the T-200, these are slightly smaller microns than the other choices, and there life expectancy is advertised at 7 to 10 years. I purchased two seperate packages totaling two pounds at a cost of appx. 15 dollars apiece.
Like gramps used to say, "Why is it there's never time to do it right, but there's always time to do it over?"

Goldghostwine
 
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RE: food plots in poor soil

Postby Goldghostwine » Tue Mar 15, 2011 4:16 am

for a spring summer planting I swear by buckwheat...deer and turkey here love it....helps suppress weeds and the roots break up the soil....very easy to disc in ...any frost will kill it down fast it is a good soil builder....does well in poor soils...also gives you a food source while the lime is improving your soil for other plants...because it takes time for lime to work.....Good luck...Good huntingRIVER goes by!WIND runs by!BABY you~pass by without why!
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