Florida's Future

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Sailfish
 
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Florida's Future

Postby Sailfish » Tue Jan 06, 2009 4:26 am

I read an article recently written by Tony Young the FWC Media Relations Coordinator about hunters in Florida and the future.

A few of the highlights:


7 million (thats the size of Vermont) acres will be converted from rural to Urban in 50 years. 3 million from agricultural lands, 2.7 native habitat and 1.6 from wetlands.
 
Our population will double.

Bears and turkeys habitat may decrease by 2 million acres.

The loss of land could result in 60K+ or more fewer deer.

Hunting leases are expected to raise ( $2 an acre in 1985) from $15 an acre up to $300 an acre.

If we think we are crowded hunting now, imagine then.

A big concern is that large tracts of land will become fragmented and segmented, thereby cutting off animals. Essentially there is the potential for one big (or more) concrete subdivision through the state.

What we can do (and some is already being done) is create local taxes to protect local ecosystems (30 counties are doing this already AKA doc stamps).
Keep lands connected via farmland, wetlands, woods, etc, but the animals need the uniterrupted land.
You/we can:
-Ask our city or county if it has a local land acquistion program. Are the roads being designed and located to accommodate wildlife { I am certain this isn't being done in Hillsborough county}
-Does our community view conserving its green infrastructure and wetlands with the same importance of maintaining roads, buidlings and bridges?
-Are you incorporating wildlife habitat conservation measures on your own property?

Here is the link to the FWC site that has more information, diagrams, etc. the important thing we must all do is get involved. At some level we must all get involved to protect our rapidly disappearing resource!

Wildlife 2060: http://myfwc.com/wildlife2060/
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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69Viking
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby 69Viking » Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:41 am

Wow Sailfish, that is pretty sad.  I know in NW Florida we're fortunate to have the Eglin AFB Reservation that protects a lot of our land, I hope that never changes.  It's a scary situation that's for sure but what can be done!?
 
I volunteer for the Eglin Natural Resources division and help out where I can.  The problem is big corporations and government are the ones allowing the loss of habitat.  My opinion is that farm lands should be turned into protected wildlife refuges, the land there is fertile and perfect to support wildlife.  I currently work in IT but if I can ever land a job that helps to protect our environment I'll jump at the opportunity. 

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Sailfish
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby Sailfish » Tue Jan 06, 2009 7:30 am

ORIGINAL: 69Viking

Wow Sailfish, that is pretty sad.  I know in NW Florida we're fortunate to have the Eglin AFB Reservation that protects a lot of our land, I hope that never changes.  It's a scary situation that's for sure but what can be done!?

I volunteer for the Eglin Natural Resources division and help out where I can.  The problem is big corporations and government are the ones allowing the loss of habitat.  My opinion is that farm lands should be turned into protected wildlife refuges, the land there is fertile and perfect to support wildlife.  I currently work in IT but if I can ever land a job that helps to protect our environment I'll jump at the opportunity. 


Yes it is hopefully we can get some higher governement officials on our side. Sadly (as whats happening with our recreational fishing) money generally overtakes conservation.
 
I have seen so many wetlands destroyed in the name of economics. The 'sad' part is the developers are required to "recreate" a wetland somewhere else. I am quite positive man cannot create something that nature took millions of years to refine.


I think some of the WMA's are old farmland or family homesteads that the state manages for the estate. Its a great plan, however it all relies on funds, the funds run out and they will start nixing these programs (unless we stand up). Not sure if you recall but the state recently announced the potential closure of 22 state parks (non-hunting) because of low-funds; we can only hope the WMA's and other public hunting lands are next.


I also sent you a PM
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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FlDeerman
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby FlDeerman » Wed Jan 07, 2009 9:47 pm

Build a fence,tell the rest of the country"ENOUGH"!!Tell them "[8|]Alabama is great this time of year."

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Sailfish
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby Sailfish » Fri Jan 09, 2009 3:19 am

And so it begins.
From todays St. Pete Times
 
http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/state/article963424.ece
 
"TALLAHASSEE - The Florida Legislature's freezing of its premiere land-buying program is only the biggest and most high profile of several blows to environmental programs proposed with this round of budget cuts."
 
"Both the House and Senate plan to sweep tens of millions of dollars from funds for environmental initiatives ranging from land management to cleaning polluted waterways."
 
"..to save $20-million over a full year by halting the Florida Forever land-buying program. Under the proposal, the state would stop issuing the remaining $250-million worth of Florida Forever bonds, used to purchase environmentally sensitive land. The House also is considering the measure."
 
• Pulling more than $35-million from a trust fund for land management, used for such programs as prescribed burns to prevent massive forest fires.  {This is just horrible for the state.}
 
• Wiping out $10-million - all the funding this year - for the water quality assurance trust fund, which helps communities clean up polluted waterways.
 
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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Sailfish
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby Sailfish » Mon Feb 16, 2009 1:02 pm

Couldn't find the link but I read where Crist has promised to continue with the land buying program
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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Sailfish
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby Sailfish » Tue Feb 17, 2009 4:01 am

And then I read this today: [:@][:'(]
 
If stuff like this is allowed to happen, our hunting lands will diminish FAST. If the land isn't gobbled up right away, woods and swamps would become cut off by pavement boundries limiting animal movement, having the same affect as not having any hunting lands at all.
 
Slump fix: Build more houses!
 By Craig Pittman and Matthew Waite

[email= cpittman@tampabay.com] cpittman@tampabay.com[/email]

  Florida legislative leaders want to make it easier to get permits to destroy wetlands, tap the water sup­ply and wipe out endangered species habitat, all in the interest of building houses, stores and offices.
  "We've got to get permits going and flowing," said Rep. Trudi Williams, R­Fort Myers. "We need to make some incentives for people to revitalize our economy."
  But opponents, ranging from Audubon of Florida to the Florida League of Cities, say making permits easier to get ultimately would hurt the economy and the environment. State officials estimate 300,000 Flor­ida houses are vacant. Why add more, asked Audubon's Eric Draper.
  The groups pushing for looser per­mitting include such powerful enti­ties as Associated Industries and the Florida Home Builders Association.
  "We need to be creating conducive conditions for more growth," said Frank Matthews, who lobbies for the builders and developers. "You know what the Florida economy is based on. It's an article of faith that those houses will one day be occupied.''
  Associated Industries president Barney Bishop suggested a suspen­sion of impact fees that local govern­ments charge developers to help pay for roads, schools and other public facilities for new residents.
  Senate Bill 630, sponsored by Sen. Mike Bennett, R-Bradenton, would block local governments from collect­ing impact fees on new development through 2012. Another Bennett bill, Senate Bill 360, calls for eliminating most state growth-management re­view of big, new developments.
  The home builders, meanwhile, want to reduce the number of agen­cies that have a say on development permits. Matthews called it "less over­lap, less duplication."
  Take endangered species habitat, he said. Right now a federal agency, the U.S. Fish and Widlife Service, as well as the state's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and vari­ous local governments all get to com­ment on permits regarding destruc­tion of that habitat.
  "We like the idea of having a single regulatory body in charge of a single subject matter," he said.
 "We need to be creating conducive conditions for more growth. You know what the Florida economy is based on. It's an article of faith that those houses will one day be occupied.''
 - Frank Matthews, lobbyist for the builders and developers
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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OHhunter
 
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RE: Florida's Future

Postby OHhunter » Tue Feb 17, 2009 6:52 am

I thought the one benefit of the slumping economy would be less land being developed.  Doesn't make sense to build more.
Brad

HUNT HARD, SHOOT STRAIGHT, CLEAN KILL APOLOGIZE TO NO ONE

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