Scent Control

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SwampLife
 
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RE: Scent Control

Postby SwampLife » Wed Feb 24, 2010 11:13 am

I need to step up to the plate in this area. Outside of washing my clothes in scent free soap, storing them in a tote and occasionally spraying scent killer, I am lacking in scent control.

I am strict on playing the wind but, shifting winds can be a killer. Plus, playing the wind doesn't always work when that big boy doesn't play by your rules.

My 2010 goal is to follow a strict scent control strategy. Much like many of the ones posted here.
No Shortcuts. No Excuses. No Regrets.

extroverted
 
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RE: Scent Control

Postby extroverted » Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:25 pm

I like what you are all saying but I take it one step further, most of your scent is in what you eat or drink, remember the old saying you are what you eat???

Well for me, I don't eat anything that contains spices such as curry, garlic or Hobbs yes beer and so on for at least 2 months before bow season opens. Plain chicken and water for me!!!

Then I wash ALL of my cloths and wash towels or anything else that going to touch the bode 2 months ahead of time in hunter specialties detergent. For deodorant I only use non scent hunter stuff.

My hunting cloths get washed before and after each hunt then back into a tote with cedar and pine chips remain stored all year around.

Doing all this just makes us think they can't smell you, but as we all know you just have to stay out of the wind!!
Most likely the deer will smell you regardless of what you do!!!

Then there is the cover scent of RACOON pee sprayed onto my boot bottoms!! I swear by this stuff and it does not put the deer on alert such as fox spray.

extroverted
 
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RE: Scent Control

Postby extroverted » Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:30 pm

swamplife
I agree with you on the wind just last year I was hunting from one stand, and because of the wind in the area I was hunting was doing a constant rotation I went into a tent and things got really interesting... from now on I always keep a tent on the properties I hunt on just in case I cant control the wind!!!

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Scent Control

Postby Woods Walker » Wed Mar 31, 2010 3:31 pm

I read all these posts, and I cannot believe that many of you have the trouble you do getting as busted as much as it seems.

I hunt on the ground, I do keep myself and my clothes clean (the clothes get stored in a Rubbermaid tub with a cachet of leaf duff in it, so that it smells like an autumn woods), I take chlorophyll tablets during hunting season, and I play the wind. I eat whatever I like during deer season, and I do not use carbon clothing, as everything I've read about them convinces me that they are pretty much a huge rip-off. I can count on one hand the number of times I've been busted over the past 30 years deer hunting in Illinois. I will not list the size and numbers of deer I've killed, other than to say that I've killed my fair share.

Personally, I think that each of us has different body chemistries, and that, I believe, has more to do with this than what we eat, or wear. I also think that whenever I hear stories of hunters being busted IN A TREESTAND, that maybe it isn't their SCENT that spooked the deer, but their MOVEMENT. I hunted pretty much all the time from treestands for 23 years, and in all that time I was NEVER busted by a deer that I could see. Maybe there were some that made me at 200 yards where I couldn't see them, but not ever did I have one withing view. A lot of hunters are regular "Mr. Fidgets", and also have nary a clue as to how to set up so that they are not skylined. The popularity of tent-type ground blinds may support this theory. Years ago when I did a lot of waterfowl hunting, and the success of the pit-blind was a prime example of this, especially the ones that had solid covers over the hunters so that the only one who could look up and bee seen was the guide.

Another example of this theory is that SO many hunters swear by camoflage, when in reality if you don't shine, rustle, MOVE, and use the shadows and cover to your advantage, you don't "need" camoflage at all. Too many hunters use it as a crutch, like it will "hide" them. It sure helps if you heed the above, but if you can't sit still, it's just more expensive clothing that you don't need.
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Goose
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby Goose » Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:52 am

I chose the first one, I think it is must in bow hunting older deer. Some, if not most, have more skill than I, so I need to do everything in my power to up my odds.
I certainly do not think you are lessening your odds by trying to reduce your odor.
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

bmorris
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby bmorris » Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:07 am

ORIGINAL: JPH

The recent news about Scentlock has spawned some spin-off threads on scent and scent control. Apparently some of us are rethinking the entire concept of scent control and how important it may or may not be.So without getting into activated carbon or any products, I'd like to know:

How important is the "elimination" or "control" of human and/or unnatural scent to your 2010 whitetail hunting strategy?


Thr ruling will in the long run be very profitable in that it will cause a lot of thought to go into our hunting strategy. Stand placement etc.
Some of the new technology will be interesting to consider.

retiredsailor
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby retiredsailor » Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:08 am

Frankly, this whole issue over the Scentlock case has me mildly amused. As one who smokes while hunting and does not use a 'bottle', but still bags several deer each year, I guess I'm amongst the minority on this scent control matter.

I do pay attention to the wind and don't use regular soap (for bathing or laundry), aftershave, and those sorts of things, and try to avoid garlic a few days before heading into the deer woods. I also accept the fact that probably many more deer see me than I see of them. And I certainly don't contest the fact that deer have a highly attuned sense of smell and they use it as one of their protective mechanisms.

As stated above, I am satisfied with the number of deer I bring home, and the number I see - bow season, buck and doe
seasons and during our muzzle loader week. Scentlock or not, or some other scent control offering, I will probably just
stick to what I've been doing for years. If others want to try different things, I say go for it. Just please don't bad-mouth me for following my methods.

I remember some years ago when I saw the first ad for Camo-gum (not sure of the exact name).......I chuckled and thought who would buy that. However, I've since read several serious articles wherein the writers swore by this gum as a method of controlling the scent of their breath. Perhaps it does work, and if anyone I know wants to use it, I say, by all
means do so, and good luck with it. Meanwhile, I'll stick to my coffee and cigarettes.

antlerjockey
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby antlerjockey » Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:58 am

ORIGINAL: JPH

The recent news about Scentlock has spawned some spin-off threads on scent and scent control. Apparently some of us are rethinking the entire concept of scent control and how important it may or may not be.So without getting into activated carbon or any products, I'd like to know:

How important is the "elimination" or "control" of human and/or unnatural scent to your 2010 whitetail hunting strategy?


IMHO, scent control is extremely important. However, to get too crazy is overdoing it. If you hunt the wind, like anyone that's spent any amount of time hunting whitetails, or other species for that matter, your less likely to get busted. Forget the wind has gotten into people's head's with the scent control measures they now take. If I have to wait for you to get ready at the truck for 45 mins before we enter a hunting area, it's prob. going to be the last time you and I hunt together. There are very simple and effective ways of controlling your scent, some I have gone over and over in articles, and hope people take to heart.

But above all else, you want to stay clean, and hunt the wind. You can tell how important the wind is just by hunting elk. If you feel the wind on the back of your neck, your done. Same goes for all whitetails. The best thing you can do by staying clean is buy yourself that extra couple steps before the blow and whirl to staple a set of shoulders shut. The camo chewing gum thing always made me laugh, I chew cope, and I will come short of saying it's an attractant, but I hope one day alot of deer that have seen the inside of my stomach can contest that it'll blow the sit or stalk. Hey, I'm honest, and trust, I kill deer.

IMHO
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shaman
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby shaman » Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:40 pm

I'm not sure the options are quite what they should be.

I mean, as a for instance, you may think scent control is extremely important, but you're rethinking how you do it.  You may not think it's as important as woodsmanship, but you still take extreme care.

Know what I mean?

I answered the second one.  However, I was suggesting in the "Towards a New Understanding" thread that we all take time to re-think scent control.  I mean, after all, if the judge is correct you've had yo-yo's running around the woods for 20 years in fraudulent suits made with carbon sprinkles and it hasn't hurt their game.  That must make some of ya' all think?
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JPH
 
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RE: Scent control

Postby JPH » Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:13 pm

ORIGINAL: shaman

I'm not sure the options are quite what they should be.

I mean, as a for instance, you may think scent control is extremely important, but you're rethinking how you do it.  You may not think it's as important as woodsmanship, but you still take extreme care.

Know what I mean?

I answered the second one.  However, I was suggesting in the "Towards a New Understanding" thread that we all take time to re-think scent control.  I mean, after all, if the judge is correct you've had yo-yo's running around the woods for 20 years in fraudulent suits made with carbon sprinkles and it hasn't hurt their game.  That must make some of ya' all think?


Not sure I follow you. Let me know what options should be added and I'll add them.

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