Judge yardage from a treestand

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Hunting Junky
 
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Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby Hunting Junky » Tue Sep 29, 2009 8:15 pm

I know that a rangefinder would solve any doubts or second guessing on this but How much of a difference is it from being on the ground then say being up 20ft in a treestand? Big? small? Is there a formula?? I've hunted most of my time on the ground and this year I bought a climber. When Im in it things seem closer then what they did on the ground. There has to be more yardage involved.? Does it change with the shooting angles? Can you guys help clear this up for me. This is my first year bow hunting (I love that thing). Ive shot it (from the ground) at my bag target so many times it looks like I shot it with a fully auto.

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shaman
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby shaman » Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:23 am

If you want the formula for calculating the distance from up a tree vs. on the ground, you can't do any better than the pythagorean theorem:  a^2 * b^2 = c^2.    Let's assume you see a deer standing next to a tree that you know to be 20 yards out.  Your stand height is 20 feet.

a^2=20^2 = 20 X20 = 400 feet
b^2 = (20*3)^2 = 60 X 60= 3600 feet

c= the square root of ( 400+3600)=  63.25 feet or 21 yards.

What Pythagorus is telling you here is that at 20 feet up, the difference between the ground and the treestand ain't all that much.

The big problem is going to be the fact that by being elevated, and shooting down, you are somewhat negating the effect that gravity will have on the arrow.  The formula to calculate that is much more complicated, but a high-school physics textbook would teach you how. 

The rule of thumb used to be: Beyond 20 yards, subtract one pin.  That is, if the deer presents himself at 30 yards, shoot with the 20 yard pin.  I bought my last bow in 1996, so forgive me if that rule does not fit your new bow.

That should not be something you take for granted anyway.  To find out where your bow really shoots, you need to go up the tree and actually fire at your target from  straight down all the way out to your farthest shot and actually get a feel for it.  The faster your bow shoots, the less you will have to compensate for distance and elevation.
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cdn1
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby cdn1 » Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:40 am

Me thinks the Shaman Must be or may have been a high school math teacher.
Pathagerus ain't got nothing on the Shaman.[;)]
Cdn1

drdaven
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby drdaven » Wed Sep 30, 2009 3:52 am

Junky,

To save you a few bucks and the trouble falling off your roof.  Borrow a buddies rangefinder and practice it a few times at your local 3D range.  They almost always have some elevated shots.  Better to learn there than on that big ol' buck.  Added bonus is shooting with others.  Nothing like a little competition to put a little nervousness into the shot.  Not as much of a rush as out in the field, but a close second. 
Hurry, it's not to late.
Hunting the Michigan Thumbs agricultural mecca...farm country bucks taste the best.

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buckhunter21
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby buckhunter21 » Wed Sep 30, 2009 7:29 pm

You can do all the math you want, but I think that nothing beats just being out in the woods and learning how to guess yardages.  For instance, guess a certain yardage and then walk it off and see how close you are.  Animals will seem to be at different distances if you are looking at them in an open field versus the timber, also.  Rangefinders work too! 
QDM!

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ranwin33
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby ranwin33 » Thu Oct 01, 2009 3:04 am

If you're in a treestand, step off the yardage from various points around your stand, then you won't have a question as to how far things are.  Once in my stand I use a range finder to determine distance to certain other trees at 20, 30 and 40 yards, then when the deer show up I already have a good idea how far away they are based upon my previous efforts.
 
If you don't have a range finder, just step off the distance before you get into a stand.  Maybe not at 20, 30, and 40 yards, but mark a few 20 yard trees.  If it's a permanent stand, find yourself some of those little orange landscape flags and stick them in the ground at various distances.
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
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Wanderer
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby Wanderer » Thu Oct 01, 2009 3:15 am

If you want the formula for calculating the distance from up a tree vs. on the ground, you can't do any better than the pythagorean theorem:  a^2 * b^2 = c^2.    Let's assume you see a deer standing next to a tree that you know to be 20 yards out.  Your stand height is 20 feet.


Shaman's math is 100% correct but his syntax is slightly off. pythagorean theorem: a^2+b^2=c^2.

mightyfofaad
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby mightyfofaad » Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:52 pm

ORIGINAL: Hunting Junky

I know that a rangefinder would solve any doubts or second guessing on this but How much of a difference is it from being on the ground then say being up 20ft in a treestand? Big? small? Is there a formula?? There has to be more yardage involved.? Does it change with the shooting angles?


With all due respect to the Shaman, who is probably smarter than me, I think I can give you an answer without your needing to bring along a calculator to figure out the length of your HYPOTENUSE ... the distance between your treestand & that buck 20 yds out ... and getting a headache doing so ... plus that buck will be gone by then. [8D]

I'll give you a short Brooklyn answer ... at 20 yards ... the difference ain't nuttin. And frankly, at any distance you'll be shooting that arrow (any safe distance) I wouldn't worry about a miniscule addition more than negated by the downward trajectory. [sm=rolleyes.gif]

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shaman
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby shaman » Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:32 am

Shaman's math is 100% correct but his syntax is slightly off. pythagorean theorem: a^2+b^2=c^2.



Ooops.  Yep.    You're right.



Look, the guy was looking for a formula.  That's the formula.


The way I normally deal with yardage is to go and pick out key features around my stand and step them off in the off season.    If that isn't possible, I spend my time waiting for the deer,  estimating yardages to trees. 

"This must be about 10 yards, therefore that must be about 15, and that one there's about 25. . ."

or

"If a deer were to come out there I'd use the top pin, if he came there, I'd use the second pin.  .  ." 
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cva54
 
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RE: Judge yardage from a treestand

Postby cva54 » Tue Oct 06, 2009 3:26 pm

WOW I got a head ache just looking at them there numbers. I just got a range finder 1 of them bow hunter ones

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