Using Maps

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Powell1120
 
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Using Maps

Postby Powell1120 » Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:25 am

I have seen some recent post where this topic has been touched on, I was hoping that maybe we could cover this topic more in depth. Which type of map is more useful, Aerial or topographic? What can be learned from using them together? I have never used this tactic myself but I am going to start this year in hopes of gaining a better understanding of the properties that I hunt. I have included both versions of maps of a property in an effort to help people explain them selves. This is a property that I hunt, I did this not get someone else to plan my hunts for me but so if there were any questions regarding the area I might be able to help with that.

 

Powell1120
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby Powell1120 » Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:51 am

Well, i can not figure out why my pictures are not showing up...maybe someone else could help with this, either direct me of how to or even just lend us some maps to use. Thanks.

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shaman
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby shaman » Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:07 am

email me the maps or tell me where they are and I'll try to help.
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Goose
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby Goose » Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:59 am

Aerials are nice for seeing edges, what type of habitats are in the area, and just nice for being able to "see" the property.
Topos are nice for seeing elevations. You can locate ridges, saddles, finger ridges, and valleys. You can pretty much tell how the land lays out.
Using them both together can really give you a good idea of what the property looks like without even stepping foot on the land.
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

Powell1120
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby Powell1120 » Sat Jan 23, 2010 5:30 pm

OK, I think I got the pics figured out. The property in question is around the house that is in the upper center, the fence lines that are east and west of the house headed north and south are the property lines, the south property line is hard to define since it cuts throught the timber south of the creek. East of this property about a half mile is the Des Moines River. The field south of the house is the first crop field that the deer will come to. The hay fields that are one the property to the east are all high fenced. The Owner there used to raise Elk but not any more. The red areas are the High fenced sections, Blue is the land that I have Access to, and the white is a know Doe bedding area.


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shaman
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby shaman » Sun Jan 24, 2010 2:50 am

I agree with what Goose said.  In this case, the dominant feature  is the big creek to the South, and the two branches that come into the property. All deer movement will have something to do with that.  Secondly, you've got a property dominated by an open field.

Deer are lazy, like us.  They won't travel straight up a hill if they can find a easier way to get there. Look to either side of the field, between the two creeks for travel corridors.

The other part of the topo and aerial that attracts my attention is the level wooded area to the south of the field.  This might be where the deer congregate and hold before coming out into the field to eat.  The topo gave me a hint of that, showing it was flat.  The aerial confirmed it.  I'd also be interested in the fact that the wooded area is somewhat broken.  There's somewhat of a clearing there, right on the point.


Given this area to hunt, I would set off to scout the edge of the field and look for sign.  There may be an area that is grown up and might afford bedding.  If the deer have something to eat in the field, you will also see sign moving from the lower elevations into the field.   Therefore, I would use the map and aerial to plan my first scouting trip:

1)  Scout the edge of the field.  Start at the house and work my way around the edge counter-clockwise.
2)  When I get to the property line on the east side, I'd go 1/3 to half way down the hill to the creek and reverse course, and walk in the woods back to the farm.
3)  Somewhere in 1 or 2, I would detour into the flat wooded area to the south and scout that thoroughly. The best time might be as the elevation gets steep on the south point during my swing back.
4)  Lastly, I would want to comb the SW corner of the place and see what's going on in the bottoms.  All the sides of all the creeks need to be investigated for crossings.  Whether I did this as a separate trip or a second sweep on the same trip, it may give valuable clues as to where the deer moving.

Now would be a great time to do this scouting trip, but anytime before now and the beginning of turkey season will do.
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SwampLife
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby SwampLife » Sun Jan 24, 2010 4:26 am

depends on what you already know about the area you hunt.

where i hunt in FL its flat, really flat. topo maps are more useful as kindling for the campfire.

if you have not downloaded google earth for your computer you need to. you can shift the angle of the aerial view to see the contour of the land as well, zoom way in, drop unlimited number of pins, it is an absolutely invaluable scouting/record keeping tool.

http://earth.google.com/
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SwampLife
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby SwampLife » Sun Jan 24, 2010 5:05 am

[img]URL=http://img710.imageshack.us/i/4a4198cc81b14a3ba72390c.jpg/][img]http://img710.imageshack.us/img710/2240/4a4198cc81b14a3ba72390c.jpg[/img][/URL][/img]

the yellow dots would be the first places i would look for heavy trails and possible stand sites.The orange dot is probably the money spot.

the dot to the east i would set very close to the field edge and use it for an evening stand, the dot to the west i would set a bit deeper in the woods, enter it from the west for a morning sit, this may or may not work depending on wind direction.

also, if you can get to the very SW corner of the property w/o bumping all the deer in the woods i would check that out.
No Shortcuts. No Excuses. No Regrets.

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scotman
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby scotman » Sun Jan 24, 2010 7:04 am

I overlayed both maps in photoshop to give you a better idea. The black lines is were I would look for travel corridors.

Image
"The deerskin rug on our study floor, the buck's head over the fireplace, what are these after all but the keys which have unlocked enchanted doors, and granted us not only health and vigor, but a fresh and fairer vision of existence" -Paul. Brandreth

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scotman
 
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RE: Using Maps

Postby scotman » Sun Jan 24, 2010 7:10 am

Or I should say the black lines are natural funnels. The closer the elevation lines the more steep the terrain will be at that point when your looking at the map.
"The deerskin rug on our study floor, the buck's head over the fireplace, what are these after all but the keys which have unlocked enchanted doors, and granted us not only health and vigor, but a fresh and fairer vision of existence" -Paul. Brandreth

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