Tracking question

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Squirrelhawker
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby Squirrelhawker » Wed Nov 18, 2009 3:57 am

I totally agree that the uphill/downhill thing is myth. Deer do what they think they need to do. I gotta think this deer is gutshot.

nateberly
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby nateberly » Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:31 am

ORIGINAL: nateberly

I would also think that it was a leg shot. USUALLY with a gut shot they like to go downhill, or into swamps. Maybe look for more hair or bone at the shot site. Blood will get darker if it is let sit for a while, so the color will change a little if you are on an old trail.

Do you have snow, because you say no blood for 300 yards, but you still seemed to track him fine?

I would let him lay down for a while, if it is cold out give him a good couple hours and then get back on the trail. I am still confused about your tracking though. You should be able to keep tracking him without blood if you already did for 300 yards with no blood.

Good luck!


Yes, I guess I am feeding the downhill gutshot myth. I did say usually, but trying to predict what a wild animal will do is not very easy. And I want to say that I am not an expert at gutshots :-) I just listen to what other hunters say. I am sure it has a lot to do with the severity of the wound, which doesn't sound good in your case.

FatBob- any updates on your progress?

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bwhntr
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby bwhntr » Wed Nov 18, 2009 2:17 pm

I don't know how thick the area is, but this happened to me quite a number of years ago, I shot a buck and watched him run off, I made a bad shot to the paunch, very little blood or gut matter. I looked at the thickest stuff around there. About 60 yards away. There he lay. I guess he had crawled in there it was so thick. Think, Thick Cover, and good luck. 

fatbob240
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby fatbob240 » Thu Nov 19, 2009 3:12 am

Well, I am at a loss now. I took three experienced trackers out with me again yesterday and we performed a grid search, looking under every blow down, every swale, every ridge and valley in a half-mile square and turned up nothing. The rain has started today....but I'm going back out. Call me crazy, but I can't let this go.
Goal: 1 shot= 1 kill

Squirrelhawker
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby Squirrelhawker » Thu Nov 19, 2009 4:43 am

I hear you. But, once you've done everything you can do, you've done everything you can do.

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Cut N Run
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby Cut N Run » Thu Nov 19, 2009 10:39 am

I wish you much luck in finding your deer. Please don't take this the wrong way. What I'm going to say will ruffle some feathers here, but it is how I feel. 
 
 No cartridge has killed more deer on this continent than a .30-30.  On the other hand, No cartridge has wounded more deer than a .30-30.  Yes, the caliber is adequate to kill deer, but it is hardly one of the best performers out there.  I totally get the sentimental value of hunting with a firearm that has been passed down the family. Maybe it is time to start a new tradition of handing down a firearm of a more superior caliber to deer hunt with. I have had to track many deer for others that were shot & lost with a .30-30. So much so, that I won't hunt with one.  I won't use a .243 for the same reason.  Sure both will kill deer, but there are many calibers out there that will do it better.
 
Check the ballistics on the .30-30 versus a .308 or .30-'06 or .270.  The .30-30 lacks the knockdown power and does not retain as much energy over longer hunting ranges. Face it, as hunters it is our job to dispatch our prey as humanely and quickly as possible.  Plenty of deer have also been lost to the other calibers mentioned, but to start out with a firearm as limited as a .30-30 puts you at a greater dis-advantage over some of the other more suitable calibers for deer.
 
I truly hope you find your deer and it helps feed you & your family. As much time and effort as it takes to hunt successfully, you ought to be properly rewarded. 
 
 I have hunted with a .308 since 1982 and I am no expert, but I have killed truckloads of deer with it.  I lost one that was shot with my rifle in 1986 because the bullet deflected on a limb that I did not see when I squeezed the trigger. A friend killed that buck a few days later and it had been grazed across the front leg, which barely broke the skin. Most of the deer I shot with my rifle either drop immediately, or I hear them crash shortly after they run. I researched this caliber for the wooded conditions I hunt and it matched well.  I am not a big man, so the recoil is not unpleasant, yet ballistically, the .308 is only about 100 f.p.s. slower than the .30-'06.  The '06, in my opinion is the best all-around cartridge for big game on this continent. I am not a fan of its recoil though.
 
I scincerely hope you get that deer before the scavengers do.  I do not mean to pick on you, it is just that I would rather see you in a picture posted here smiling with the deer you took (which hopefully will still happen), than to read about another potential deer lost to a .30-30.
 
Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

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Marc Anthony
 
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Location: Illinois

RE: Tracking question

Postby Marc Anthony » Thu Nov 19, 2009 11:37 am

This may be of interest for you regarding tracking a deer.

I have helped numerous friends track deer in some of the most difficult terrain and I made a discovery about 2 decades ago. I've noticed when tracking blood trails to the point of no more blood, many times the deer will get to that point and feel like they're going to fall shortly, so they actually back track on the very trail they just ran on only to make a 90 degree turn into a gully and die. It appears that they feel they cannot run any longer so they look for cover. Many times when a deer is spooked or injured, they'll run on the very trail that they know is safe. They know it's safe because they just ran on it! So they'll reverse quickly only to run out of energy within 20 yards or so and pile up in a deep crevice or gully.

Most hunters will run out of blood and continue on, which also happens to be a good idea but when they can't find the deer, they go out even farther. Make sure you go in reverse after finding the last drop of blood and look heavily in the gullies!

I hope that info helps.
"A fool learns from his own mistake but a wiseman learns from a fool's mistake "

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nhdeerchaser
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby nhdeerchaser » Thu Nov 19, 2009 11:39 am

I may be wrong here, but does'nt watery blood indicate a gut shot?

Mike
You can't kill'em sittin' on the couch!

Squirrelhawker
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby Squirrelhawker » Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:51 am

ORIGINAL: Cut N Run

I wish you much luck in finding your deer. Please don't take this the wrong way. What I'm going to say will ruffle some feathers here, but it is how I feel. 

No cartridge has killed more deer on this continent than a .30-30.  On the other hand, No cartridge has wounded more deer than a .30-30.  Yes, the caliber is adequate to kill deer, but it is hardly one of the best performers out there.  I totally get the sentimental value of hunting with a firearm that has been passed down the family. Maybe it is time to start a new tradition of handing down a firearm of a more superior caliber to deer hunt with. I have had to track many deer for others that were shot & lost with a .30-30. So much so, that I won't hunt with one.  I won't use a .243 for the same reason.  Sure both will kill deer, but there are many calibers out there that will do it better.

Check the ballistics on the .30-30 versus a .308 or .30-'06 or .270.  The .30-30 lacks the knockdown power and does not retain as much energy over longer hunting ranges. Face it, as hunters it is our job to dispatch our prey as humanely and quickly as possible.  Plenty of deer have also been lost to the other calibers mentioned, but to start out with a firearm as limited as a .30-30 puts you at a greater dis-advantage over some of the other more suitable calibers for deer.

I truly hope you find your deer and it helps feed you & your family. As much time and effort as it takes to hunt successfully, you ought to be properly rewarded. 

I have hunted with a .308 since 1982 and I am no expert, but I have killed truckloads of deer with it.  I lost one that was shot with my rifle in 1986 because the bullet deflected on a limb that I did not see when I squeezed the trigger. A friend killed that buck a few days later and it had been grazed across the front leg, which barely broke the skin. Most of the deer I shot with my rifle either drop immediately, or I hear them crash shortly after they run. I researched this caliber for the wooded conditions I hunt and it matched well.  I am not a big man, so the recoil is not unpleasant, yet ballistically, the .308 is only about 100 f.p.s. slower than the .30-'06.  The '06, in my opinion is the best all-around cartridge for big game on this continent. I am not a fan of its recoil though.

I scincerely hope you get that deer before the scavengers do.  I do not mean to pick on you, it is just that I would rather see you in a picture posted here smiling with the deer you took (which hopefully will still happen), than to read about another potential deer lost to a .30-30.

Jim

 
I lot of this was running through my head as well but, as to the OP the range I believe in this case was 60 yards. Though not an expert in centerfire ballistics I would think that well within the effective range of the 30.-30.

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bwhntr
 
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RE: Tracking question

Postby bwhntr » Fri Nov 20, 2009 7:54 am

Many Shades of Red

Experienced trackers realize that blood colors can vary. Blood can be bright red, crimson or quite dark, depending upon the location of the wound. Knowing the difference, and knowing how blood color depicts wound location, will help you determine how long to wait before tracking.

Bright, almost pink blood indicates a lung-shot deer. However, a muscle wound also results in bright blood and is sometimes confused with a mortal lung wound. Foamy blood is also sometimes found when tracking a lung-shot deer.

The blood color of a heart-shot deer (when lungs are spared) is similar to those with muscle wounds. The blood appears crimson, but not as bright as the blood of a muscle wound.

More important, though, is the ability to recognize dark blood. The blood trail of both stomach- and intestinal-shot deer appears much darker than that which comes from any other wound. Identifying dark blood is often difficult when the blood is wet, but it turns very dark when it dries.

Paunch-shot deer require you to wait several hours before tracking, which is why recognizing dark blood is essential to the recovery of the animal. A paunch-shot deer that is pushed may travel a long distance. Worse, the blood trail is usually weak and hard to follow.

A final word regarding blood colors: They can vary depending upon the angle of the animal when it was shot. For example, if a deer is quartering away or angling toward the hunter, a bullet or arrow could pass through both the paunch and muscle or perhaps the lungs and paunch. This could result in finding both bright and dark blood.




Blood droplets that are teardrop shaped fall onto a surface that is not flat or from a moving animal, the point on the teardrop will indicate direction of travel. Remember that a slanted or angled surface that has a slant or angle will cause tear dropping as the blood rolls or slides downward from gravity.

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