Archery Accuracy

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Lot to Learn 2
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby Lot to Learn 2 » Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:33 am

ORIGINAL: gtonagel

I'm fairly new to archery but want to make sure that I am a competent enough shooter when in the woods. When practicing on targets, what is a good standard of measurement? for example, what should my groupings be at x amount of yards? Mind you, I'm not shooting competitively, just hunting ethically. Any thoughts?


I have only been shooting 5-6 years myself so I remember the learning curve pretty well, these guys have given some good advice. what is your set up, what bow, arrows, and broadheads are you using?   Even today, when I switch over to broadheads if I am off I always assume it is me and not the set up. I would also recommend shooting how you are going to hunt, either elevated or from your knees or both.  I don't align my broadheads, I did when I shot aluminum, but have never with carbon and I am on at 40. This year I had one arrow that kept going high right, took the broad head off and did the same with filed point so retired that arrow.

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Sep 22, 2009 3:34 am

Details aside as far as what gear you're using, I'd add this.....
 
Whatever range you find that you are consistent with at whatever yardage, you may want to REDUCE that range by 1/3 or more for when you are in a hunting situation. There's no such thing as a "group" when you shoot at a deer. There's no warm up either.
 
In fact, if you could (and I know this isn't practical or feasible, but humor me anyway), the best way to determine what your HUNTING group/range is would be to sit in a confined area for several hours at least, preferably in the cold, with little or no movement. Now hyperventilate yourself while moving as little as possible so that your heart is beating like a triphammer, and shoot ONE arrow. Do this 6 days in a row, and then see what your group is.
 
For most of us, it's much easier and less time consuming to just reduce our maximum effective range when in the field.
 
If you're new to bowhunting, you also need to consider that shooting at a deer in the woods is WAAAAAAAAY different than shooting at a 3-D target. Consider the exercise that I outlined above, and now combine that with the fact that the deer you are attempting to shoot is standing in shadows/cover, and you MUST know what angle it's standing at so that you know where to aim on it's body so that your arrow will pierce the vitals. Deer in the woods RARELY, if ever, give you the broadside shot like you see at a 3-D shoot, and without the other shooter's hit marks for you to aim at in their scoring rings either. All this has to be figured in literally seconds while you are under the physical stress I described earlier.
 
How many times have you heard or read about some bowhunter who's lamenting about a deer that he hit ("I KNOW that arrow went right in the spot behind the shoulder! I saw the fletching!"), but couldn't find. I'd be willing to bet that 90% of the time he shot at this deer like he would have if it were broadside to him, and although the arrow DID enter where he said it did, it also missed much of the vitals. I've killed deer that were quartering away from me at enough angle that I actually aimed for the area BEHIND the last rib so that the arrow would be dead center on the vitals. On a broadside deer this would be a sure gut-shot. This is why with a bow, you HAVE TO KNOW exactly how the animal's standing in realtion to you.

 
IMO, I don't believe that attempting a shot on a deer in the woods with a bow at ranges past 40 yards is ethical, and I don't care how good you are on a target range. I know shots are made successfully at distances past this, but I'd also bet that there are PLENTY of others that are not. Penetration points are vital with a bow, and if you are off just a little it can spell the difference between a kill and an unrecovered deer. It's hard enough to determine this at close range under the stress of the shot. There's also the fact that as an animal gets farther away from you, the chance that it will move enough to ruin the shot also increases significantly. If there's ANY sound that comes from your bow, increased distance only gives the deer that much more time to flinch or move. Bows are fast today, but they've still got around 900+ FPS to go before they're supersonic.
 
Many things can go wrong when you shoot at a deer with a bow. Increasing distance only compounds these odds in favor of Murphy.

Do the right thing and play it safe.....reduce your range.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

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cutngut85
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby cutngut85 » Tue Sep 22, 2009 3:51 am

I completely agree with WW.....the situations you encounter while shooting a deer are way different than target shooting. I feel 100% confident in shots up to 35 yds. Have I shot and recovered deer beyond that, yes. The fact is that you usually have one shot and you need to feel comfortable and confident that that shot will kill. No matter how much I practice, shooting at a deer always brings me back to basics.

vt_archer
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby vt_archer » Tue Sep 22, 2009 5:30 am

Along the same lines, how many of you carry a range finder as part of your gear? Relatively new to bow hunting myself, and have wondered if the majority of seasoned hunters just "know" the range base on experience, or have a couple near misses and then go buy a range finder?

DeanoZ
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby DeanoZ » Tue Sep 22, 2009 5:38 am

Although all my shots have been within 20 yrds, I just went out and bought a rangefinder.  I used to measure off the distance out to possible shots in my shooting lanes, but had a couple missed opportunities because Iw as not comfortable with the range or forwhatever reason forgot to pace off the distance before getting in the stand.  Now my SOP will be to lase objects in shooting lanes with the rangefinder once I'm settled in my stand.

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buckhunter21
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby buckhunter21 » Tue Sep 22, 2009 8:23 am

I'm going to go with 6 inch groupings, which I think is a little smaller than a paper plate.  The kill zone on a deer isn't that huge, and you should know where to aim when the deer is broadside or quartering away. 
 
Best of luck, and like Goose said, it's VERY addicting!!!!
QDM!

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Goose
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby Goose » Tue Sep 22, 2009 10:11 am

The vitals on a average adult whitetail are about 10" by 12".
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

Lot to Learn 2
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby Lot to Learn 2 » Tue Sep 22, 2009 10:29 am

range finders are great for marking before the deer gets there. Once you see the deer that is a lot going on.

vt_archer
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby vt_archer » Tue Sep 22, 2009 1:10 pm

That's what I was wondering, Lot to Learn... if you're on a ridge line behind a .308, yeah, I totally get that.. but fumbling around with a bow, release, range finder, etc within 30-40 yards (if that) seems like a whole lot of movement

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Archery Accuracy

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:00 pm

And 30 to 40 yards is EXTREME hunting range for the average archer, no less a beginner, for the reasons I outlined. Try 10 to 20 to be more like it.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

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