How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

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pmsmith2032
 
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How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

Postby pmsmith2032 » Wed Sep 16, 2009 3:34 am

Can anyone provide info/tips on locating food sources and bedding areas in deep woods areas (northern Wisconsin)? To me, locating these two areas seem to be key to hunting success. However, it is difficult to do in forested areas with no agricultural areas and food plots. Thanks in advance!

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Goose
 
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RE: How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

Postby Goose » Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:01 am

I would highly recommend Greg Millers books on this topic. He has a couple devoted to doing just what your asking. He's from northern WI and has a lot of experience in the big woods.
 
I would suggest burning a lot of shoe leather in trying to figure them out. It is a different game and hard work is the only way to succeed.
Clear cuts are a great feeding location for the first 5 years or so. After that they make great bedding areas.
Follow trails and see where they go and come from.
Ridges are great spots especially oak ridges. Saddles (little dips) on ridges can also be a great ambush spot.
Creek crossings and even beaver ponds are a great place to look. Green food is normally more abundant along a water source so the deer will frequent these areas as well.
Thick cedar swamps are also great bedding areas.
 
I guess my best advice is to do some hard-core scouting and see what the sign tells you.
 
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

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69Viking
 
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RE: How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

Postby 69Viking » Wed Sep 16, 2009 5:08 am

ORIGINAL: Goose

I would highly recommend Greg Millers books on this topic. He has a couple devoted to doing just what your asking. He's from northern WI and has a lot of experience in the big woods.

I would suggest burning a lot of shoe leather in trying to figure them out. It is a different game and hard work is the only way to succeed.
Clear cuts are a great feeding location for the first 5 years or so. After that they make great bedding areas.
Follow trails and see where they go and come from.
Ridges are great spots especially oak ridges. Saddles (little dips) on ridges can also be a great ambush spot.
Creek crossings and even beaver ponds are a great place to look. Green food is normally more abundant along a water source so the deer will frequent these areas as well.
Thick cedar swamps are also great bedding areas.

I guess my best advice is to do some hard-core scouting and see what the sign tells you.



Pmsmith this is some great advice Goose has given you, I can't really think of anything more to add other than buy the book if he says it will help you. I originally just read magazines but have learned so much more since I started reading books recommended by forum members. With a family of 4 though I just wish I could find more time to read! Good luck, Goose's advice should get you on the right track.

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Woods Walker
 
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Location: Northern Illinois

RE: How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

Postby Woods Walker » Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:58 am

ORIGINAL: 69Viking

ORIGINAL: Goose

I would highly recommend Greg Millers books on this topic. He has a couple devoted to doing just what your asking. He's from northern WI and has a lot of experience in the big woods.

I would suggest burning a lot of shoe leather in trying to figure them out. It is a different game and hard work is the only way to succeed.
Clear cuts are a great feeding location for the first 5 years or so. After that they make great bedding areas.
Follow trails and see where they go and come from.
Ridges are great spots especially oak ridges. Saddles (little dips) on ridges can also be a great ambush spot.
Creek crossings and even beaver ponds are a great place to look. Green food is normally more abundant along a water source so the deer will frequent these areas as well.
Thick cedar swamps are also great bedding areas.

I guess my best advice is to do some hard-core scouting and see what the sign tells you.



Pmsmith this is some great advice Goose has given you, I can't really think of anything more to add other than buy the book if he says it will help you. I originally just read magazines but have learned so much more since I started reading books recommended by forum members. With a family of 4 though I just wish I could find more time to read! Good luck, Goose's advice should get you on the right track.

 
Yes he did. He pretty well covered it.
 
The only thing I'd add is to look for EDGES. Not field edges necessariy, but edges of ANY type of habitat or vegetation types. They may also be very subtle, such as where an area of heavy shade meets an area of more sun. The difference in the plant growth both in variety and quantity can vary enough to be a draw to deer. Look also where there may be a "bump" in the topography. Deer will sometimes work these "bumps" or humps like fish do in an otherwise flat lake. In Wisconsin, who's topography is glacial based, these are not uncommon. We have these in Illinois, and they are usually populated by oaks, and in good mast years can be a real deer magnet. The main thing is to be observant, and like Goose says, you will cover a lot of ground. The woods may all look the same, but I assure you it's not.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

Skinner Creek Stalkr
 
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RE: How to Find Food Sources and Deer Bedding Areas in Deep Woods

Postby Skinner Creek Stalkr » Fri Sep 18, 2009 4:17 pm

I have been a northern WI big woods hunter my whole life and I have to say that everything that has been reccommended is great. I concentrate on beaver dams as deer will use them for crossing when the ponds are active. Also I target edges of preferrably three cover types converging. Lastly, and this one is fairly rare but works good when you can find it is target oaks when acorns are dropping. I hunt approximately 25,000 acres of county land and I know of only a handful of spots where oak ridges occur in any amount. Great stuff though guys.


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