Another treestand tragedy...

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Everyday Hunter
 
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Another treestand tragedy...

Postby Everyday Hunter » Mon Oct 04, 2010 1:41 pm

Sadly, another treestand tragedy on Pennsylvania's opening day.

Steve
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Jslotter
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby Jslotter » Tue Oct 05, 2010 12:29 am

Sounds like his safety harness killed him???
I only hunt on days that end in ' Y '.

msbadger
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby msbadger » Tue Oct 05, 2010 12:42 am

How sad...but I have to wonder...How would he have gotten "wedged" between the tree and stand?

My new stands came with a harness that has a safety foot strap you hook to the front of harness...so God forbid you fall...and cant get a foot hold then you have one right there to take the pressure off your leg straps...I won't climb without it this year

retiredsailor
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby retiredsailor » Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:28 am

True.....very likely another avoidable accident, and so sad for the family and friends.

I worry about the possibility of falling from my stand and then dangling from the harness. Therefore, I always make certain that my buck knife is in a position where I can get to it even while hanging from the harness. I'd much rather experience a 'controlled' fall from cutting myself free then to just hang there helplessly.
I like the safety foot strap idea. That could be a blessing in such circumstances.

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Everyday Hunter
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby Everyday Hunter » Tue Oct 05, 2010 3:34 am

ORIGINAL: retiredsailor

True.....very likely another avoidable accident, and so sad for the family and friends.

I worry about the possibility of falling from my stand and then dangling from the harness. Therefore, I always make certain that my buck knife is in a position where I can get to it even while hanging from the harness. I'd much rather experience a 'controlled' fall from cutting myself free then to just hang there helplessly.
I like the safety foot strap idea. That could be a blessing in such circumstances.

I suppose a "controlled" fall is better than one where you go flailing to the round, but there are problems with "controlled" falls, too. A few years ago my brother was trimming limbs from a tree in his back yard and the ladder began to slip. He threw his chainsaw away from the area directly below him and grabbed onto a limb. His grip wasn't great, and no one was home, so he looked below and saw that the ground was clear, and dropped 20 feet. (I measured it.)

As they say, the only problem is the sudden stop. Depending on how straight your legs are and how much of the impact they can absorb, all kinds of things can happen. You can break bones from your heels to your neck as the weight of your body compresses the skeletal column. Knees, hips, vertebrae... something is going to break, and it will be life-changing (assuming you live.)

But broken bones aren't the worst. Remember that all your internal organs weigh something, and will be subject to momentum. That sudden stop can tear your heart from it's soft-tissue moorings, and you'll bleed to death instantly. Same with your liver, stomach, kidneys. These organs aren't anchored well enough to resist that kind of G-force.

When my brother fell, I remember reading somewhere that in 50% of the falls from heights greater than 15 feet, the victim will die, often from massive internal hemorrhage. In my brother's case, he shattered both his heels. One was in 16 tiny pieces and the other was in six. Shattered like teacups. The first doctor who saw his X-rays told his wife that he'd never walk again. I saw him in the emergency room, and he was writhing in pain like I've never seen. Nothing they gave him could touch the pain.

Fortunately, he was surgically repaired and is walking today, doing the work of a deputy sheriff. He's a good one. In fact, he's my hero. A year before the accident he captured one of America's 10 most wanted -- literally in his own back yard. Today he has several titanium plates and screws in both heels, and wears special shoes. He's lucky to be alive. If any soft tissues had torn loose, even a little tear would have killed him.

So, lots can go wrong in a "controlled" fall, and the bottom line is that you don't have much control at all.

By the way, here's the story of the capture referenced above: Pennsylvania's Crime Fighting Deer. I left out names because friends of the criminal were making threats against law enforcement officers. The guy himself had killed one and wounded two policemen in New York, and was threatening to "spill pig blood" all across New York and Pennsylvania. Score one for the good guys.

Anyway, bottom line is any fall can be very serious.

Steve
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retiredsailor
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby retiredsailor » Tue Oct 05, 2010 4:02 am

My Lord.....now you've really put my fear a falling at a level I hadn't considered. Of course, I understand that falling from a normal climbing height (I usually stay around 15-18 feet), 'controlled' or not, one is risking some serious injury; however, sometimes there is no other option. The situation you described with your brother is a case in point. Knowbody around and he certainly couldn't hang there for any long period. It isn't the most desireable outcome, but it may be the only option.
I am glad to hear that your brother has recovered as well as he has. He must possess a strong will and very positive spirit. No surprise that you admire him.
The link to the capture story was most interesting. Thanks for passing it along.
Perhaps the best option, in addition to always using the harness, is to use a safety foot strap. I'll have to look around for one.

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SwampLife
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby SwampLife » Tue Oct 05, 2010 10:39 am

I would much rather fall 'uncontrolled' than 'controlled' while swiping a buck knife over my head trying to cut a harness.

IDK, I guess I would rather just....

not fall at all.
No Shortcuts. No Excuses. No Regrets.

scottflesher
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby scottflesher » Tue Oct 05, 2010 2:12 pm

Steve, I'm glad your brother "recovered". Let's just all promise each other that we'll be as safe as we possibly can this year. I enjoy the stories on this site, but don't want to hear of any bad ones.

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buckhunter21
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby buckhunter21 » Wed Oct 06, 2010 4:20 pm

Pretty sad.  Just when you think you're safe wearing a safety belt, but yes, you can die from 'just hanging there.'  Prayers to his friends and family.

Everyday Hunter...Glad to hear that your brother recovered like he did.  Life is precious!
QDM!

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Everyday Hunter
 
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RE: Another treestand tragedy...

Postby Everyday Hunter » Wed Oct 06, 2010 5:18 pm

Thanks, guys. He still has titanium plates and stainless screws holding his heels together, he wears special shoes, he has pain all the time, and he can't chase criminals like he used to do, but he insists on doing pretty much regular duty. He could have taken disability, but wouldn't.

He hasn't hunted since the accident. The cold bothers him and he can't be on his feet very long, but also, I think an experience like this takes its toll in more ways than physical. One of these days I hope I can get him out.

Steve
When the Everyday Hunter isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.
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