Do you?

What's the hunt looking like this year in your area? Share!
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shaman
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby shaman » Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:09 am

Woods Walker wrote:"It has an added benefit: when we're really bored, we can flush the toilet and watch the dogs chase the sound down the pipe. Ah! Life's simple pleasures!"

To this I can only add Jeff Foxworthy's all time famous catch phrase......"YOU MIGHT BE A REDNECK!" :lol:

Oh...and shaman, you owe me a damned keyboard for the one that just shorted out when I snorked coffee all over it when I read your post!!!! :o




But it' true! To make it even better (this is honest truth) the kids from up the road used to come down and do the same thing! We'd be sitting out back and we'd here the toilet flush and then a bunch of kids would come piling into the backyard and go running down the hill. I had to put a stop to it, because they were draining my cistern. They found a new way to entertain themselves: catching frogs in the cesspool back at their place.

A lot of the older houses in our county are grandfathered in and don't need a septic system. You'll be out driving and there'll be a pipe coming out of the ground out in the pasture and a trickle of water going down to the stock pond. Needless to say, we stay out of the creeks.
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Woods Walker
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Dec 27, 2011 3:24 pm

"Needless to say, we stay out of the creeks." :lol: LMAO!

And the other advantage of this is that your kids already know one of the two most important things you have to know to be a plumber.........."Don't bite your nails, and **** always flows downhill!"

:o :mrgreen:
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

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freak nasty 145
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby freak nasty 145 » Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:25 pm

Anybody who leaves trash, shotgun hulls etc.... in the woods, are flat out lazy people. Where i hunt at i found trash wrappers by these guys treestands and went ahead and cleaned up for them. Seems to me that people have no respect for nothing.
"Any sportsman who can kill his deer without the tingling spine, the quick clutch at his heart, the delicious trembling of nerve fibers when the game is finally down, has no place in the deer woods." Lawrence R. Koller. (1948).

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kellory
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby kellory » Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:47 pm

They will most likely believe the forest critters are using it for bedding, and will leave twice as much the next time. If I cleaned up after the slobs, I would be tempted (did not say would ) to drop a load in the seat of his stand to make a point. ( you crap in my yard, I will crap in your's?) :lol:
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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Rutnut
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby Rutnut » Wed Dec 28, 2011 10:57 am

The trash heap on the road way…always has pissed me off. 2 years ago I moved deeper in the country. My new road is dirt (unpaved), and there are only a ½ dozen houses on the mile and a half stretch. I was surprised (kind of) to see frequent litter along the road. The usual, beer cans, cigarette packs, coffee cups. I mean what kind of A-hole moves into the beautiful woods and turn it into a dump. It amazes me.
The one good thing about driving a pick up truck is, besides hauling deer, it makes a nice trash can. I often stop to pick up trash and toss it in the back. So easy a caveman can do it.

Marlboro cigarette packs used to have Marlboro miles on them. I made it a point to pick up cigarette packs when ever I went jogging. I figured it did some good for the environment, and I could get rewarded at the same time. I collected thousands of miles and would cash them in for rewards. Some of the items I remember receiving were, a compass, two way radio set, tent, lighter, poker set, duffle bags, hat, shirts, and much more.
There was someone that threw a Marlboro light pack in my yard every single day. I named them the Marlboro light bandit. I never did catch them. Wish I had a trail camera back in the day…that would have been an easy catch!!

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Ohio farms
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby Ohio farms » Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:34 am

One of the few magazine subscriptions that I have focuses on Ohio. One feature is called "Cuffs and collars" which list all the DOW citations issued by areas of the state along with a verbal story of the incident.. I'd say that 30 - 40% of the citations are for littering. People bank fishing and just throwing out their garbage when they leave despite garbage cans nearby. I'll never understand how people can do that. Never.
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

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Homunculi
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby Homunculi » Wed Dec 28, 2011 3:05 pm

Ohio farms wrote:One of the few magazine subscriptions that I have focuses on Ohio. One feature is called "Cuffs and collars" which list all the DOW citations issued by areas of the state along with a verbal story of the incident.. I'd say that 30 - 40% of the citations are for littering. People bank fishing and just throwing out their garbage when they leave despite garbage cans nearby. I'll never understand how people can do that. Never.


when my father took us out the only way you knew we were there is if you seen the car parked or the tire tracks that we left behind .. i hunt on my inlaws property and the only way to know i am there or have been there is my hunting blind is up .. .. all cups wrappers hulls arrows or fletching are cleaned up when i leave ... wish the neighbors and the hunters on their properties would follow the same rules ...

and ohio farms .. the lot i work on at one store .. they can be 3 ft away from the garbage can and still toss everything on the ground or turn their ashtray upside down by their doors ... .. dump 1 year old french fries .. burgers or chicken nuggets .. on the pavement cigg packs ... lottery tickets .. whatever ...
and i live on a state route ... i try to keep my yard clean but seems like a morning walk before work out front to get a 12pack of beer containers ... mcd'd bags .. or empty cig packs ...
If I ain't huntin i ain't livin!!

hunting is not only skill but, being in the right place at the right time ...

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SwampLife
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby SwampLife » Wed Dec 28, 2011 4:09 pm

Picking up trash becomes second nature when you grow up in a family that owns a janitorial company.

It doesn't matter where I am, it is just a reflex.
No Shortcuts. No Excuses. No Regrets.

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kellory
 
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Location: Ohio

Re: Do you?

Postby kellory » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:24 pm

Rutnut wrote:The trash heap on the road way…always has pissed me off. 2 years ago I moved deeper in the country. My new road is dirt (unpaved), and there are only a ½ dozen houses on the mile and a half stretch. I was surprised (kind of) to see frequent litter along the road. The usual, beer cans, cigarette packs, coffee cups. I mean what kind of A-hole moves into the beautiful woods and turn it into a dump. It amazes me.
The one good thing about driving a pick up truck is, besides hauling deer, it makes a nice trash can. I often stop to pick up trash and toss it in the back. So easy a caveman can do it.

Marlboro cigarette packs used to have Marlboro miles on them. I made it a point to pick up cigarette packs when ever I went jogging. I figured it did some good for the environment, and I could get rewarded at the same time. I collected thousands of miles and would cash them in for rewards. Some of the items I remember receiving were, a compass, two way radio set, tent, lighter, poker set, duffle bags, hat, shirts, and much more.
There was someone that threw a Marlboro light pack in my yard every single day. I named them the Marlboro light bandit. I never did catch them. Wish I had a trail camera back in the day…that would have been an easy catch!!

Are you by chance downwind from Shaman's place? ;)
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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shaman
 
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Re: Do you?

Postby shaman » Fri Dec 30, 2011 6:15 am

Now I admit to leaving the occasional shotgun hull in the blind, and the occasional wrapper as well. However, what was already there was somewhat surprising and what blows in is even more surprising. I had to stop mowing one section of road frontage, because I was sick of losing my mower blades to errant car parts. The one next door neighbor has been running an illegal junk yard for years. The others? Let's just say I don't have the neatest of neighbors and leave it at that. Some of them might be literate enough to find their way here.

I don't want this to sound like I have a 200 acre trash heap, but folks out in this part of the country did not seem to be all that impressed with the anti-litter campaigns of the 60's. I have an amazing collection of beer and soda cans scattered across the property, mostly from the generations of hunters that used this property as an unofficial WMA before I moved in. Occasionally I'll be moved to pick something up and cart it back, but most of it is of such an age that it is somewhat nostalgic just to keep around. I may run into a beer bottle from a brewery that has not been around since my Grandpa's time. I am pretty sure these are from deer hunters, too. You don't see anything from before the advent of modern deer seasons.

Now of course, you might say, "Shaman, why don't you pick it up?" Well, there are a couple of reasons. First off, it give me something to ponder. Second, if I picked up all these vintage cans and bottles, and brought them up to the house, I'd probably be more likely to get robbed. I suppose I could sell them on Ebay, but that seems like a lot of trouble and it really is nice to see someone come out to visit and go on a hike and find one of these things and ask me "Shaman, can I keep this?" Sure. See? Now I have a friend for life.

There is one other thing I will mention, and this is a secret deer hunting strategy. If you find a few beer bottles out in the woods, it is always a good idea to stop and figure out what that fellow was doing when he sat there and drank them. These weren't stupid people wandering drunk in the woods (well not all of them) . Occasionally you get some insight. There have been a couple of places on the farm, where those telltale clues led me to see where these guys were sitting to do their hunting. Furthermore, you can see that there are different cans and bottles in the same area. That means multiple people used this spot. If you find a beer bottle from the Sixties, that's golden!. That means even with the deer herds at a tiny fraction of what they were now, someone thought enough of this spot to sit and hunt.

The result of all this briar archeology has jived with all the other scouting: deer sign, topo reading, etc. The bottom line is that the old beer bottles and Pepsi cans are amazingly good indicators of current deer activity. If I find old litter, I usually find current deer sign. Beer equals deer. The converse is mostly true as well: in an area filled with old hillbilly litter, if you find a no beer, the deer will usually be non-existent as well. There are a few spots on the farm that look like they would be great for deer hunting from a structural point of view, but in 10 years I have never seen a deer-- never saw a bit of litter in there either.

While I'm on the subject, I will clue you into another litter-related strategy. One of the things I did early on was cart a bunch of 5 gallon buckets out and set them around the likely spots I wanted to hunt. I'd then still-hunt from one bucket to the next. Occasionally I'd find a cigarette butt next to a bucket, and I'd know I was being poached on, so I'd concentrate my patrols around that bucket. In another instance, I noticed there was a guy hunting pretty close to my line. He'd also clipped the fence. I talked to the landowner, and he said it wasn't one of his people. I put bucket out some distance from the line, but within sight of the stand. I put out some beer bottles I collected, and took some toilet paper and wadded it up and threw it around a freshly overturned rock between me and the stand. The stand went away.

I'm feeling like I'm giving away all my most guarded secrets here, but you might ask "Shaman, why not just pull a Kellory, on the guy?"
Kellory: You realize of course your doodie-on-the-stand-seat is now and forever associated with you? I have the R&D guys trying to come up with fake Kellory-in-a- Bag that hunters can use to scare the other guy off their stand. The key is going to be working in the micro-encapsulated scent crystals.


The answer is simple. Unless the other guy comes back rather quickly, your message is going to be fairly unrecognizable. One good rain, and all you're going to have is mud. Toilet paper on the other hand lasts for good part of season. Napkins and paper towels work even better. The point here is not honking the guy off. Rather it is to suggest to the guy that there is a drunken slob near his stand that has serious gastro-intenstinal issues. You need to let him discover this on his own and let his mind to most of the work for you. If at first you don't succeed, throw in an old Playboy magazine, a gut pile, the wrapper from some Limburger cheese and a handful of spent brass or shotgun hulls.
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