General question

What's the hunt looking like this year in your area? Share!
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shaman
 
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Re: General question

Postby shaman » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:33 pm

Generally I would suggest a stand over a ground blind for the simple reason that it's probably going to be the most successful way to go, but there are a lot of caveats.

First, you're new to this. Stand hunting is a bit different. You've got the height issue, you've got a body heat issue (metal stands are big heat sinks.) and also you have to somewhat restrict your movement.

My advice, if you're going to go that route is to get a nice metal ladder stand with a shooting rail and put a camo skirt made of camo blind material all the way around it. For height, I like 15 feet. It's high enough without being too high.

Of course, these are gross generalities. If you could send us some pictures of the place showing possible stand/blind sites, we could possibly offer better advice.

Here's my favorite stand, just like I described:

Image

. . . and here's my favorite ground blind. It's a bit much, but it's comfortable:

Image

Now, why one over the other?

Opening day, I'll be in the stand. It overlooks the woods and one end of the field. The weather will be optimal. The wind will be right.

At the other end of that field is the blind. It looks out the entire length of the pasture. It has 200 yards worth of vista going in two directions. When the deer. When the deer are in the acorns, I go to the stand whenever I can. When the deer are out in the pastures feeding later in the season, I'm more likely to be in the blind.

I pick a stand like the one shown, because i like being in the open, in the woods, where I can have a close shot at a deer. On the other hand, I spent a good part of last season in the blind. It was windy, it was cold, it was rainy, and it was nice having a roof over my head.
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JPH
 
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Re: General question

Postby JPH » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:43 pm

I don't want to monopolize the conversation but since you asked...

Heck yes! Shoot the first legal deer that offers an ethical shot. Period! Do not let the things you see on TV or the expectations of braggarts and posers taint the way you hunt. Take what is legal, ethical and makes you happy! You may have objectives that shift through your career as a hunter, but the expereince of taking your first deer is an awesome one, no matter what the deer is.

Secondly, I would definitely make an effort to contact the other hunter before the season starts. If for no other reason than because it is unsafe to do otherwise. The card on the stand [i]might[i] work, but I'd try to get his info from the landowner. One trick I use is to fill out a couple of 3X5 index cards with all my information (name, phone numbers, vehicle info, plate number, etc.) and give them to the landowner with the message that I want to know right away if anything has been left out of place or their as a concern/complaint. You may want to do this and ask the landowner to pass one of them on to the other hunter.

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shaman
 
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Re: General question

Postby shaman » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:48 pm

I could not agree with JPH more.
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Woods Walker
 
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Re: General question

Postby Woods Walker » Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:45 pm

Listen to JPH. He just saved me a lot of typing!
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
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Sierra
 
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Re: General question

Postby Sierra » Fri Nov 09, 2012 4:46 pm

Thank you Shaman and JPH and Woods Walker! I would like to try a stand, and that goes along with getting ahold of this other hunter. I will make the cards, good idea... I will be out scouting again this weekend so I can talk to the landowner and give them to him. I am worried about the cold with a stand, but I have decent gear and I will layer up. If I need to move I can. Next year I will have the added benefit of bow season, so perhaps I can invest in my own stand so I would not be limited to what is already there. The acorn area is near the closest water source as well. I will have a great view of the trailhead, but I wouldn't mind being down in there too. I just hope I can be in my spot and feel confident about it and not second-guess too much! :) I look at it this way. I will get four days of the week long gun season to hunt all day, and the other three days I can go right after work and setup for the evening. Even if I don't even see a deer, I'd rather be outside in the fresh air than driving my cubicle. It's never time wasted.

If I am fortunate enough to have the opportunity to shoot a deer this year, I will be grateful for whatever it is and excited about it. Lots of pictures will be taken. :-) I am glad you brought up an ethical shot. I work hard at shooting and I could never bear the thought of any extra suffering due to my own bad judgement. I would rather pass it up. It will happen someday. If not this year then next, and if not then, eventually. I am pretty positive about it.

Tell me more about where you guys hunt. :-) In the meantime I will try to figure out how to upload a picture.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven

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Sierra
 
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Re: General question

Postby Sierra » Fri Nov 09, 2012 5:05 pm

Here is the arial view of my stomping ground.

Image


The acorn area is on the southern portion of the yellow trail, and the stand I am favoring is at that 'island' of trees in the 4th grid down from the top, three full grids in from the right.

Other stand I like is in the middle of the treeline between both ends of the red trail, where it forms a point.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven

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kellory
 
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Re: General question

Postby kellory » Fri Nov 09, 2012 8:13 pm

Sierra, I too am in the center of Ohio, (Columbus for me) though I hunt a bit further south near Amanda. That sounds like a good place to hunt, but I don't think I would use a treestand there. I would use a tripod stand. Especially with the back problems.
360 degree view, on a center stool (with a back) that swivels. skirted and covered, and a blind heater. It could be used in those trees, or independent of the trees.
Manard's had them on sale recently., but I didn't check the prices (sorry)

You would be more comfortable, no tree in your way to shoot around, warmer, and while a bit awkward, they are very portable. I am thinking of getting one myself.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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Woods Walker
 
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Re: General question

Postby Woods Walker » Fri Nov 09, 2012 9:40 pm

Sierra: One more plus about using a treestand.....

Right now you need to be able to observe as many deer as you can so that you can learn as much about them as you can. This includes just being able to see them...or should I say PARTS of them...in the woods. You will rarely see whole deer at first in woodland settings. A flick of an ear or tail, or even the white ring by their nose may be the first part of the deer that becomes visible to you.

Once you start seeing them then you need to observe them as the move and go about their business in the woods. This ties in with being able to read their body language which is vitally important to knowing when to shoot or just as importantly when NOT to shoot. You can watch all the videos you can about deer, and read everything that's printed but even with that there's nothing that replaces simply being in the woods and watching them. Treestands are great for this because of the increased visibility they give you. Treestands are also an excellent way to kill deer, again because of the visibility plus the fact that you are above their line of sight and your secnt also tends to rise above them under most conditions.

Based on this I wholeheartedly recommend that you get yourself a good pair of binoculars, take them into the tree with you and USE THEM. Don't leave them in your pack, hang them close by or better yet get yourself a Bino-Buddy type harness so they are strapped onto you and out of the way at all times so that you DO use them.

I hunted from treestands for 30+ plus years, killed a pile of deer from them and in the process obtained the knowledge about them that I have. It's the best way to learn. I've since moved out of the trees and now pretty much stalk/stillhunt them on the ground, but without getting my "basic education" in the trees I wouldn't be able to hunt them like I do now.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
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Sierra
 
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Re: General question

Postby Sierra » Sat Nov 10, 2012 8:13 am

Thanks Kellory for the idea. I just had to buy a new suv so funds are limited, but the idea sounds cool and I will check them out for next year. Nice to see a neighbor on here, I am in Delaware. There is a Menards in Marion, and I am heading up there today. I didn't know they had hunting stuff, all I knew of them is from NASCAR. I can price them at least and see what I think. Another thought I had was getting permission to place a new ladder stand at a place of my choosing, for next year after my winter and spring scouting. I could find a good comfy one. (The ones there don't look very comfy).

I do have binoculars! They are not the best but decent and will work for the moment until I can upgrade them. I keep them in my truck as well so I never forget them. I should take some time to sit out there and just watch the field some more. I am generally on the move when I am out there. I don't know what that harness is you mean but I will find out. Speaking of harnesses, what would you recommend for a stand harness? I am nervous of falling out now that I have committed myself to using it.

A few more questions popped into my head. Do you use a call to stop a moving deer, or hope they will stop or slow down? When I practice shooting, I do practice taking my shot quickly. I have a call I can use and I will practice with it. Here is my silliest question. I have to accept physical limitations to being female. I am strong, but I am concerned about putting a deer in my vehicle. Do you guys just muscle them in, or do you have some sort of aid? Or should I talk to Mike (landowner) and find out when he will be there to hope for some help with it? Maybe I will be so pumped up I will just pitch it in there like wonder woman. :-) grrr!
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven

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kellory
 
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Re: General question

Postby kellory » Sat Nov 10, 2012 1:07 pm

Sierra wrote:Thanks Kellory for the idea. I just had to buy a new suv so funds are limited, but the idea sounds cool and I will check them out for next year. Nice to see a neighbor on here, I am in Delaware. There is a Menards in Marion, and I am heading up there today. I didn't know they had hunting stuff, all I knew of them is from NASCAR. I can price them at least and see what I think. Another thought I had was getting permission to place a new ladder stand at a place of my choosing, for next year after my winter and spring scouting. I could find a good comfy one. (The ones there don't look very comfy).

I do have binoculars! They are not the best but decent and will work for the moment until I can upgrade them. I keep them in my truck as well so I never forget them. I should take some time to sit out there and just watch the field some more. I am generally on the move when I am out there. I don't know what that harness is you mean but I will find out. Speaking of harnesses, what would you recommend for a stand harness? I am nervous of falling out now that I have committed myself to using it.

A few more questions popped into my head. Do you use a call to stop a moving deer, or hope they will stop or slow down? When I practice shooting, I do practice taking my shot quickly. I have a call I can use and I will practice with it. Here is my silliest question. I have to accept physical limitations to being female. I am strong, but I am concerned about putting a deer in my vehicle. Do you guys just muscle them in, or do you have some sort of aid? Or should I talk to Mike (landowner) and find out when he will be there to hope for some help with it? Maybe I will be so pumped up I will just pitch it in there like wonder woman. :-) grrr!


There are also Manard's on Morse rd, in Columbus, and a brand new one just opened at east main just outside of 270. I didn't know they carried hunting gear either, until I was there for something else. (If you go the the thread for "What bargains did you find" You will see a whole list of the stuff they had on clearance last year just after hunting season.)
As for calls, I am in the minority, I tend to be silent as Death until the string releases, though I will sometimes make a noise to stop them for an instant.
There are some some experts on harnesses on here, so I will leave that to them, but remember also that all stands come with a harness.
There are several easy ways to get them into the truck. If you are serious about hunting, I might recommend a loading crane be added to your truck. (these attach to the tie-down pockets at the tail gate, and a short boom swivels around to load barrels and such. It should work well with deer.
Or drag it up a loading ramp. If you can get a rope over a limb, you could use a block and tackle. I have a back-packers block and tackle with a 7:1 ratio, that weighs maybe a pound and uses 1/4" rope so use gloves.
But being as I usually hunt with a partner, two of us can load one with little trouble.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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