2 questions

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habs
 
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Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2009 1:26 pm

2 questions

Postby habs » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:26 pm

I gut shot a deer, found it the next morning but the meat was not good. how long does it take for meat to go bad? also want to upgrade my scope, I have a banner. the max. I can shoot is 300yds can I use a 3x9x40 or should I use a 4x12x40 /

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rthomas4
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:07 pm
Location: Hampton, SC

Re: 2 questions

Postby rthomas4 » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:34 pm

A gut shot deer will spoil faster than one shot in the lungs due to the bacteria released inside of the body cavity. Also the ambient temperature plays a big role in how quickly the meat will spoil. It has to be really cold for me to leave a deer overnight, especially down here in SC; and then I'm taking a chance that the coyotes or feral dogs won't get to it before I do. Luckily, since I shoot most of 'em in the neck I seldom have that problem, and the ones that I mess up on I go get my Jack Russell and put him on the trail. I do not understand the states that won't even allow people to use a blood trailing dog for wounded deer recovery.
NRA LM, NAHC LM, Buckmasters LM, The Second Amendment Foundation, GOA, NAGR, Palmetto Gun Rights, QDMA, DU, NWTF, ASAdisabled sportsmens' alliance, EDH, and Proud SC redneck REBEL for life.

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kellory
 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 3:01 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: 2 questions

Postby kellory » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:50 pm

Habs, you did not list your state, but I am assuming it is a rifle state. The scope you have is more than enough to kill deer with, I would suggest working a bit on your aim point. was the deer quartering toward you or away from you, so that you hit the guts? Or perhaps running? I would prefer to aim a bit further forward and risk a clean miss, than gut shoot a deer. As Thomas said, heat and bacteria work quickly. i would not leave a gut shot deer more than an hour or two at most, even if that meant a flashlight recovery.
thomas, I am glad to say, Ohio allows for a leashed dog assisted recovery of wounded deer.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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rthomas4
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:07 pm
Location: Hampton, SC

Re: 2 questions

Postby rthomas4 » Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:54 am

I'm lucky enough to still be able to run deer with dogs in my part of the state. I couldn't imagine living anywhere that prohibits any use of dogs for deer hunting. Even the native Cherokee and Catawba tribes used dogs to run deer in SC before the white man ever came here. Currently, we're fighting to keep that tradition alive. The non-resident hunters keep pushing to outlaw dogs and have even managed to convince the timber companies to stop leasing land to dog clubs, which is one of the reasons I'm opposed to out of state hunters being allowed to lease land in our state.
NRA LM, NAHC LM, Buckmasters LM, The Second Amendment Foundation, GOA, NAGR, Palmetto Gun Rights, QDMA, DU, NWTF, ASAdisabled sportsmens' alliance, EDH, and Proud SC redneck REBEL for life.

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Sierra
 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:03 pm
Location: Delaware, Ohio

Re: 2 questions

Postby Sierra » Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:40 pm

All I can say is that nature is aware when there is a meal available. Find and cool it quickly is what I've learned. Wish I could use a rifle, but we're shotgun only here in Ohio. (Yet rifle for everything else, go figure.) Really too bad about your deer.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven


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