to bipod or not to bipod

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Ohio farms
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby Ohio farms » Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:39 pm

That's something I've never understood people complaining about. If dog hunters are hunting nearby, it usually gets the deer up and moving, so someone sitting in a tree stand might actually get a better opportunity to kill a deer; so why complain about the dog hunters? If they don't trespass themselves, what's the big deal?[/quote]...rthomas4

I pretty much a tree stand hunter and I love seeing dogs running off my property. Gets the deer on their feet. Trespassing is another issue
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

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kellory
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby kellory » Tue Feb 04, 2014 4:09 pm

Trespass is a big issue, both by man and dog. My property is mainly pass though territory for deer. No water, other than the watering holes I put in, no crops within a half mile or so, but I get plenty of pass through traffic, usually.
I had a hunt last year, (keep in mind, I don't get nearly the hunting time I want) where the only deer seen all day, was running for it's life out of range, and no chance at all if coming to my decoy, or scent lures. Or was being chased by a couple of dogs, on my land! I was so mad I nearly shot the dogs! Only reason I restrained myself, was because they MIGHT belong to a neighbor I am on good terms with.
I climbed down and went home. My hunt ruined.
I did stop and ask my neighbor about the dogs, and they were not his, nor would he allow any dog of his to run deer. He said if any of his dogs did it, shoot em, he wouldn't have it any other way.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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rthomas4
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby rthomas4 » Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:36 am

I've never seen a dog that could read, so since they're only doing what's natural by going where the deer takes 'em I see no reason to get mad at the dogs. I'd also be willing to bet that instead of calling off your hunt, if you'd continue your sit you'd see deer moving back into the area after the dogs have gone on behind the deer they were running. Even when I'm hunting with dogs, I've often killed deer that came slipping through, often behind the dogs; or coming from the direction in which the dogs went. I've also sat in the swamp in the morning on a dog drive, killed a deer in front of the dogs and then gone back and sat in a tower blind in the same area and killed a deer with the rifle late in the afternoon. As I said, the dogs will often get deer up and moving; but also, if the dogs are on another deer I've seen many a buck lay right in his bed until the dogs were gone, and then sneak out in the direction they came from. I've even killed a few with a pistol that stayed in their beds when the does got up in front of the hounds and the old bucks just let the dogs follow the does.
NRA LM, NAHC LM, Buckmasters LM, The Second Amendment Foundation, GOA, NAGR, Palmetto Gun Rights, QDMA, DU, NWTF, ASAdisabled sportsmens' alliance, EDH, and Proud SC redneck REBEL for life.

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kellory
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby kellory » Wed Feb 05, 2014 7:42 pm

This property is too small for that. It only 9acres of woods. Once the dogs have flushed it clean, my hunt has been flushed. Stealth is the only way to hunt this area.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

loneranger
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby loneranger » Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:52 am

Trouble is deer and dogs usually don't stay on one parcel of land. I had dogs run off deer I was about to shoot :

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rthomas4
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby rthomas4 » Thu Feb 06, 2014 12:14 pm

For people who have never hunted with dogs ( in states where it's legal), perhaps you should give it a try. I've had several folks from Northern states where dog hunting for deer isn't legal, come down and go with me. They left with a different perspective after seeing how difficult it is to hunt in the South without dogs; and they also gained insight into just how hard it is to shoot deer that are being run by dogs down in our swamps.

Here in the lowcountry of SC, we are fighting to retain our traditional dog drive style of hunting. We have been over run by non residents who for the most part are wealthy archery hunters who can outbid us for leases and purchasing hunting lands. They are waging a battle to not only have our dog hunting outlawed, but also to change our game laws regarding the limits on numbers and types of deer we can kill. Already the big timber companies which own the huge majority of privately owned acreages are refusing to lease to dog clubs....the same clubs that for years were the largest group of lessees in the state. Also lands that we used to lease for a few dollars per acre, are now being leased for thousands of dollars per acre by those non resident hunters who only pay slightly more for their hunting licenses than residents. As these people become more and more successful at banning dog hunting, they are also becoming adept at driving resident hunters out of the sport due to loss of available hunting land.

I understand that land owners with very small parcels, especially in those states with short seasons and limits on the type of hunting allowed, have reason to resent free roaming dogs that run deer; but the type of dogs running the deer that I support are hounds which are owned and maintained for the purpose of running deer in an organized procedure. I myself, do not hesitate to kill the wild feral dogs that run in packs like coyotes or wolves, since this type of dog is a killer and a menace. If however, someone's hounds happen to run across my property, I'm inclined to utilize the opportunity. I guess it all boils down to the differences in geography and what we as individual hunters are accustomed to.
NRA LM, NAHC LM, Buckmasters LM, The Second Amendment Foundation, GOA, NAGR, Palmetto Gun Rights, QDMA, DU, NWTF, ASAdisabled sportsmens' alliance, EDH, and Proud SC redneck REBEL for life.

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Deebz
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby Deebz » Thu Feb 06, 2014 2:48 pm

I could get behind that style of hunting rthomas... I really enjoy doing those last day of gun season pushes through small patches of timber or the deep waterway ditches/levees that the deer bed in around us. We can't use buckshot, but I've managed to kill a couple of nice deer as they jump up from their beds.

However, dog hunting just wouldn't work for the areas that I hunt all season. My timber is a very small plot. There's not really anywhere to set up that would result in dogs being able to push deer towards me. It's basically a skinny patch of timber on either side of the creek. Surrounding that is hundreds/thousands acres of ag crops. Whenever I've busted deer while walking, they squirt right out into the open fields and are gone...

I've had hunts screwed up because 1 lousy stinky coyote was sneaking through the bedding area and blew all the deer to the next state (literally, I hunt near the state line). I've also had hunts screwed up because someone's pet dog got loose and was running all through the woods. The farmer who lets me hunt keeps several dogs, and I've often gotten pics of them on my trail cams. I usually don't see too many deer in the few days after the dogs have been roaming the woods...
"When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." ~Fred Bear

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kellory
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby kellory » Thu Feb 06, 2014 4:12 pm

Dogs may not run free, here. Leash, fence, or electronic fence. You must maintain control of your animals. Training collars can be used, but not free ranging.
I have no aversion to dog hunting as method, but not on my hunt. I am using.a method that dogs destroy.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

msbadger
 
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Re: to bipod or not to bipod

Postby msbadger » Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:56 am

JMO... Please do your self a favor

1. Learn to shoot off hand

2. buy your self a good sling

I'll tell you why...sometimes if you are out and the game comes in Hot...you won't have time to fiddle with a stick or bipod.
Now if you adjust your sling (to the clothing you are wearing) before you head out, so that you can slide your non trigger arm elbow through it as you shoulder your weapon...That will anchor your stock to your shoulder and stabilize that entire holding arm.

When you practice this at the range...it becomes second nature and that will give you a fast solid rest with out gadgets. Whether you are standing sitting or kneeling...another thing is practice with out the sling by anchoring that elbow into your mid section or on your knee when shooting...become good at this...then if you want to try a portable shooting rest, do so...but you may just return back to the sling
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