How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

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Squirrelhawker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Squirrelhawker » Tue Sep 30, 2008 8:58 am

ORIGINAL: Woods Walker

Hey Woods, If the weather is good, how long will you let a deer hang?
 
 
The only thing that I will remove after a couple of days are the tenderloins from inside the body cavity, as they will be too dried out if you leave them much longer and then you have to trim away too much of those succulent morsels!
[/quote]
 
Tenderloins? Oh you mean that "poison meat" that must be removed from every first time hunters deer. These young hunters don't know how leaving those in can spoil the rest of the deer. Naturally, I volunteer whenever I can to remove that tainted meat for them and take it far away. And then I dispose of it... in a hot fry pan.[:D]

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JPH
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby JPH » Tue Sep 30, 2008 10:36 am

If memory serves, D&DH rean an article some years back that debunked the notion of aging deer in a tree or garage. I think it appeared in the 25th Anniversary book. I'll try to look it up later.
 
I have found the taste of the meat I butcher is most influenced by how fast I get it off the bone and on ice and how carefully I trim the fat.

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NYSupersportsman
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby NYSupersportsman » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:05 am

My grandpa and his best friend taught me when I was really young. I was helping them butcher deer when I was prolly 10 years old. Then my grandpa quit doing it and now takes his to the processer. My friends and I usually do our own in our barn but last year I was away at college ( this year too) so I didnt have time to do my own.  It is very satisfying to finish the whole process yourself.  Scout, hunt, get the deer, butcher and then eat!! lol  We have our own makeshift grinder.   We bought an old hand crank grinder at a garage sale for 10 bucks and put big pulley on it and hooked it up to an old washing machine motor. It works really well.  Every time I look at grinders on Cabelas or something for 100-300 dollars I just laugh.  I never let a deer hang for more than 1-2 days. I have some nieghbors that  let them hang for weeks but I just dont agree with that. Well good luck. I hope you all are buctchering up a storm in a few weeks.  (hopefully I will be too lol )

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:11 am

ORIGINAL: JPH

If memory serves, D&DH rean an article some years back that debunked the notion of aging deer in a tree or garage. I think it appeared in the 25th Anniversary book. I'll try to look it up later.

I have found the taste of the meat I butcher is most influenced by how fast I get it off the bone and on ice and how carefully I trim the fat.

 
Have you ever actually hung/aged one in the method I described? Not someone elses deer, where you have no idea of how it was handled, but yours. I've done over 4 dozen this way and have yet to have a bad one.
 
I will say this, and it's from personal experience. Hanging them for a while DOES increase the tenderness of the meat. Even bucks in the 2 and 3 year age range are tender this way.
 
A good friend of mine had killed his first deer (in the early morning), and we took the tenderloins out that night after hanging the deer to cook for a celebratory meal. I went on and on about how good they were and all, and they were TOUGH! That was the only time I'd ever cooked meat from a deer on the day it was killed, and the only time I've ever had tough tenderloins.
 
I do think that you don't really gain a whole lot more tenderness after 5 days or so, but IMO, I think you need at least 2 days from when it was killed, if conditions are good for it (high temps of the day not more than 45 degrees). 
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
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fasteddie
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby fasteddie » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:14 am

I started cutting up my own deer about 10 years ago . I had a large hand grinder that I bought at BassPro about 6 years ago and bought an electric grinder 3 years past . Last year I bought a GameSaver Foodsaver . I am all set !
It would cost over $65 to get a deer processed around here and it's not guaranteed that you get your own deer back . If you take the care in getting your deer to a butcher and end up with someone else's , it a wasted effort !

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:40 am

Those Foodsavers are the greatest invention since sliced bread and indoor plumbing!!!
 
Not only are they cheaper in the long run (because you can reuse the bags), but mine has also saved me a good hour of time for each deer I butcher.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

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flatheadnut
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby flatheadnut » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:40 am

[font="times new roman"]I am just a beginner, but plan to butcher my own if and when I succeed.  I ran across a video series that I believe Browning funded.  It is called Wild Harvest: Big Game Field to Table, this video shows the whole butchering process step by step.  Everything is boned and made ready for the freezer.  I hope it is good accurate info because I plan to follow its instructions.  Hope this helps someone.[/font]
Hunt safe, hunt often, hunt ethically, and don't forget to say Thank You!

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Goose
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Goose » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:50 am

I like to hang them for 3-5 days if possible,we cut out the inner loins when we hang it. Early in the season sometimes we have to quarter it up the same night and put it in the fridge for a day or two. When we went out to colorado elk hunting a couple years back the rancher there had a couple of mule deer hanging in the shed and said he keeps them there all winter and when they want a piece of meat they go out and cut a piece off. I also wanna say that some steak houses offer aged meat thats supposed to be better but it also costs more so ive never tried it. Dont know which way is right but we like to leave em hang for a couple of days when possible.
Jake

Genesis 27:3 Take your bow and quiver full of arrows out into the open country, and hunt some wild game.....

hunter480
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby hunter480 » Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:50 am

ORIGINAL: Woods Walker

ORIGINAL: JPH

If memory serves, D&DH rean an article some years back that debunked the notion of aging deer in a tree or garage. I think it appeared in the 25th Anniversary book. I'll try to look it up later.

I have found the taste of the meat I butcher is most influenced by how fast I get it off the bone and on ice and how carefully I trim the fat.


Have you ever actually hung/aged one in the method I described? Not someone elses deer, where you have no idea of how it was handled, but yours. I've done over 4 dozen this way and have yet to have a bad one.
 
I will say this, and it's from personal experience. Hanging them for a while DOES increase the tenderness of the meat. Even bucks in the 2 and 3 year age range are tender this way.
 
A good friend of mine had killed his first deer (in the early morning), and we took the tenderloins out that night after hanging the deer to cook for a celebratory meal. I went on and on about how good they were and all, and they were TOUGH! That was the only time I'd ever cooked meat from a deer on the day it was killed, and the only time I've ever had tough tenderloins.
 
I do think that you don't really gain a whole lot more tenderness after 5 days or so, but IMO, I think you need at least 2 days from when it was killed, if conditions are good for it (high temps of the day not more than 45 degrees). 

 
Aging actually does make the meat more tender, as enzymes within the meat break down the muscle and connective tissue making it tender. It`s fact.
 
I`m talking to a local slaughter house, trying to get the owner to train me as a meat cutter. I`ve spent time on the kill floor, as well as much time in the boning room with a knife in-hand.
 
This guy ages beef 10 to 14 days between 38 and 42 degrees. And proper ventilation is critical. Also, don`t hang to age around gas, paint, etc., as the meat will absorb those orders.
 
I`ve had venison unaged as well as aged, and aged is the ticket for me.

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OHhunter
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby OHhunter » Tue Sep 30, 2008 12:10 pm

I do my own, have been for about 5 or 6  years.  I like to get it done as soon as possible.  It's normally to warm to let it hang during bow season.  Heck our gun seasons have been 60 degrees or better here recently.
Brad

HUNT HARD, SHOOT STRAIGHT, CLEAN KILL APOLOGIZE TO NO ONE

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