How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

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OHhunter
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby OHhunter » Fri Oct 24, 2008 1:09 am

ORIGINAL: dmcianfa

Can someone point me to a document or how to properly butcher a whitetail deer?  I've always gutted my own, but I've been butchering my own for only few years now, but I want to make sure I'm making all the right cuts for the right stuff.  I could also still stand to learn a thing or two and especially some tips and tricks to the art of butchering a deer as well as saving time.  Thanks, I would appreciate a link or actual pdf if possible. 

Happy Hunting[:D]

 
Check out this link, I have it saved in my favorites and use for reference from time to time.
 
http://www.eckrich.org/
Brad

HUNT HARD, SHOOT STRAIGHT, CLEAN KILL APOLOGIZE TO NO ONE

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joker1656
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby joker1656 » Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:45 am

I just started processing my own deer two years ago.  Last year was the first year that I actually tackled it alone.  I am sure that some will gasp in horror, while others will chuckle in amusement, but in my first solo attempt I totally missed the inner loins.  I felt a little unsure about some things, but was too proud to admit that I hadn't completely absorbed my instructions.  I looked the remains over, and decided I was finished.  I disposed of the carcass feeling fairly accomplished, and proud.  I was later discussing my feat with a friend.  He asked about the loins, and it finally dawned on me.  Although the carcass was virtually free of all edible parts, I had not removed the most delectable meat available.  [:@]  Wont happen again.  lol 

wack
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby wack » Fri Oct 24, 2008 12:38 pm

I've been butchering my own for several years now. I won't say I'm the greatest at it but I can usually skin and quarter out a deer under an hour. I've forgotten the tender loins one time also and now I usually take them out first and they never make it to the freezer.
 My friend and I each got a small antler less deer on a recent T Zone hunt and I offered to skin and quarter his. All he had to do was debone the 4 leg quarters and he could watch me do mine as we go. He didn't want to so he took his in to a good meat shop. Cost him $80 to skin, butcher and turn the whole deer into hamburger! YUCK! No beef no pork nothing added. He'll be lucky to get 20 pounds back.
 There are a few times I've taken deer in and things I look for in a good butcher are:
 How my animal is handled. I don't want my deer dragged on the ground where other deer have been dragged. I don't want my deer touching other deer. My deer should be carried from my truck straight to the hanger rack, hung while never touching the ground. The place I go starts skinning as soon as it's secured on the rack, as I'm filling out the order form. Knives are cleaned for each deer, one person does my deer from start to finish, no assembly line and I'm guaranteed that I get only the meat from my deer, exactly how I want it. You would be surprised at how some places divy up the meat, take short cuts and operate under less than ideal conditions. From what I've seen, there are more questionable places than good ones. That's why I butcher most of my own. 
American by birth, hunter by choice.

papascruffy
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby papascruffy » Fri Oct 24, 2008 5:50 pm

Several years ago I payed some one $70.00 to butcher my deer and thought Bull Butter I can do this so I've done it all since then. Its' not hard to do the worst is getting the deer up in the air after that it's a piece of cake.
Some thing kinda cool about the whole process of scouting, hanging the stand, making mock scrapes, the hunt, butchering, cooking then eating.
One knows that he would never go hungery if he had to survive on his own, he can!
 

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Woods Walker » Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:01 pm

Get yourself a block and tackle, or a come-a-long. It'll take care of getting that deer up in the air!
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

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wack
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby wack » Sun Oct 26, 2008 6:42 am

 I agree with woods walker. I've got a Remington brand game hanger that came with 2 double pulleys and rope. The hanger is pretty heavy duty and this one comes in 2 pieces. I hang it from my basket ball hoop, back my truck up right under it, make my leg slits, put a hook through each leg, put the 2 piece together, and hoist the deer right out of the truck. Easy for 1 person operation. I can stand in the back of the truck to get the hide started over the rear end or I can stand on the ground and adjust the height as needed. If the carcass wants to spin or turn on me, I wire the hanger so the carcass can't turn while I'm working on it. Once the hide is off I trim as much fat off as I can. Just seems easier cutting on the hanger than trying to take fat off of smaller pieces of meat like the back straps and quarters. The better job you do of getting the fat off, the better the meat is going to taste. Take your time, you're saving at least $70 and this is where you'll do a better job than most shops. You will also be able to see your cuts better and get more meat off the bone than most shops would.

 Some little tricks I've learned is never cut hide from the fur side while field dressing or skinning. Especially when starting the legs and finishing up at the top of the neck. Use the knife point to get under the hide with your blade out away from the meat. Fur is like carpet. Cut the back, not the fur, hairs or nap. If you cut 1" of fur from the hair side, you've just cut thouands of hairs that are now loose and sticking to your meat, knife and hands. You'll end up with a lot less hair on your meat, and save a lot of time cleaning the hair off if you just cut all hide from the inside out. I think this is the #1 mistake made field dressing and skinning. Nothing's nastier than hairy meat.
 
 The second biggest mistake when field dressing is exposing all the meat on the inside of the rear quarters, I leave as much hide on the insides of the rear quarters as possible. There is no need to cut any meat on the rear quarters in the field. Leave it covered and reach in to get entrails out of the rear so you're not exposing the meat to the entrails as you're getting them out. Leaving the hide on keeps the meat a lot cleaner when dragging out too. Also exposes less meat to air so the meat don't get crusty. I don't split the pelvic bone in the field or butchering. Too many times I've seen people break the pelvic bone to clean out the rear end and end up breaking the bladder onto the exposed meat and then drag the exposed meat through dirt and leaves on the way out of the woods. Yuck.
  Once hanging, I cut the meat down to the hip joint and use my knee for leverage to pop the joint. Be careful not to drop the quarter and pay attention to the other quarter so it doesn't come off the hanger and land on the floor. For me, this is the trickiest part of butchering when by myself. I usually use the wire that I use to keep the carcass from turning to also secure the last quarter to the hanger at the same time. Getting the 2nd quarter off the pelvic bone is a matter of a little leverage to pull the joint apart enough to get a knife in to cut the wire like tendon that holds it together. Sometimes I struggle a lot more than needed here.

 From quartering it, I then hand it over to my wife to debone and wrap. If I'm required to help, I take for ever, make a huge mess, do it wrong, complain and annoy my wife until she tells me to get out of her kitchen. To you young married or soon to be married men out there, my advise is to do the same, it will save you a lot of time in the long run! [:D]
American by birth, hunter by choice.

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mndeerslayer
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby mndeerslayer » Mon Oct 27, 2008 11:39 am

We used to but with the lack of time we have its alot easier to get it processed somewhere
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Woods Walker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Woods Walker » Mon Oct 27, 2008 12:31 pm

wack: That's how I do it too. I also stopped spliting the pelvis about 5 years ago when I field dress for those very reasons. I now carry a small Rapala fillet knife that I use to cut everything around the anus as far back as I can, so that the plumbing that's in there comes out easily and with no breakage.
 
Here's a good tip for the starting cut that goes along the inside of the hind legs when you start skinning: Try using a gut hook to make that cut. It's fast, neat, and you don't cut into the meat at all.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

Squirrelhawker
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby Squirrelhawker » Wed Oct 29, 2008 9:53 am

One of the more informative threads going on lately. We all have tips that collectively would make one heck of a book on the subject of butchering.
 
Here's one maybe everybody already knows:
 
Hair on the carcass is a pain and sooner or later needs to be removed. We reduce the amount of hair in this way- after the hide is pulled off we light a propane torch and dial it down as low as it will go and still stay lit. Then we just go over the whole carcass systematically and any hair flashes right away. No worries about burning any meat because A) the flame is always moving and B) the carcass has usually been hanging and is real cold. Smells a little but we skin outside or in the garage anyway.
 
In case anyone is keepin score, mark me down as a pelvis splitter. I want to see and confirm it is all clear and clean.

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69Viking
 
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RE: How Many Here Butcher Their Own Deer?

Postby 69Viking » Wed Oct 29, 2008 10:19 am

We have a Kelly's IGA in town that will process your deer for $40.  That includes cutting out your roasts and steaks and then making hamburger and sausage.  It's hard to beat that price for the time it saves you. 

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