when to replace a crossbow string

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hot tamale
 
Posts: 88
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:54 pm

when to replace a crossbow string

Postby hot tamale » Thu Jan 31, 2013 7:49 am

I am finally getting my crossbow permit hopefully soon. I found a doctor that saw how obvious it was that I couldn't hold my bow anymore.
So as I have been looking through the different posts, i saw one about making sure to change the crossbow string as it wont last long.
What does that mean? How long? how many shots can I get out of it before having to replace it?

When I used to bow hunt (vertical bow) I had the same string on there for a few years and never had a problem. Do you need to change your crossbow string every year? why does it wear out? does it rub on the "Bolt" rest/barrel ?

I am looking at the 10pt. Titan to pick up here in the next few weeks, have any of you had problems with these? I am getting the accu draw with it because I would need an assist mechanism due to physical disabilities.

Any thoughts on the whole string changing or the 10pt crossbow itself would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

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Deebz
 
Posts: 993
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:25 am
Location: Illinois

Re: when to replace a crossbow string

Postby Deebz » Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:32 am

Not sure about exactly how often you should change your string. I think it would probably depend on the quality of the string you are using. Obviously if there are any visible signs of wear I'd change it. You can most likely ask your crossbow dealer, or even look into the 10 point website for things like that.

The guy we bought our crossbow from was adamant about using some sort of lube on shooting rail. We bought a tube of stuff called Rail Snot, and he suggested to reapply a small amount ever 15 shots or so. Each time we get it out to shoot, we apply a very thing coat along the rail when we put the bow away. I believe the point is to reduce frictions between the string and rail to keep a constant shot and avoid excessive string wear.
"When a hunter is in a tree stand with high moral values and with the proper hunting ethics and richer for the experience, that hunter is 20 feet closer to God." ~Fred Bear

retiredsailor
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:10 am

Re: when to replace a crossbow string

Postby retiredsailor » Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:35 am

I have read that by applying the rail lube, in addition to cutting down on the friction, each time you cock the bow, as the string comes up the rail it carries a small amount of the lube up and into the cocking mechanism; thus, helping to keep it lubricated. Makes sense to me.

While I haven't had any problems with string wear, I have had the serving (where the arrow actually nocks against the string) replaced twice in just over a year. I'm told by my dealer that this is normal wear-and-tear since this is where the cocking/locking hook catches the string.

Another point I would mention (based on my own experience last season)...........be especially careful when shooting your crossbow when near of beside an object. I was in my tree-stand when a nice little buck approached from my rear area........my stand is located inside three large oak trees growing very close together (maybe from the same root base). In any case, as I positioned myself for a shot, I neglected to take into consideration that the limbs of my crossbow would be moving forward as I shot. Naturally, when I pulled the trigger, the left limb of my crossbow hit one of the oak trees and who knows where that arrow went. At first I was afraid that I may have broken the limb on my bow......but after carefully checking it over and later shooting it, I concluded that no damage had been done. Couldn't believe that I had been so stupid.........by not considering the this was not a gun I was shooting, but a horizontal bow.....with limbs sticking out on either side. Doubt that I'll make that mistake again, but I mention it here as a word of caution............

Good luck.
It isn't what happens to us, it is how we deal with it, that matters most.


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