treestand shot angle

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drdaven
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 5:35 am

RE: treestand shot angle

Postby drdaven » Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:16 am

Dan Scott,

The difference of the shot would be minimal at most hunting distances.  There is a chart you can download to check it for yourself.  It is called a "cut-chart archery"  Do a google search and you should be able to find it.

The actual difference of shot placement is based on the angle of the shot itself.  At the heights you ask about, you are only looking at a 10 to 15 degree angle.  This means you would expect the shot at 30 yards to hit where a 29 yard shot should hit.  So, you can see it is of little importance.

The only time it really starts to get hairy is 25 - 30 degrees and beyond.  The reason for this is that gravity is only working on the "flat/horizontal" portion of your arrow flight.  Hold your arrow at an angle and see how it's horizontal presentation (length) changes.  The steeper the angle, the less length there is for gravity to work on.

Clear as mud eh?  Just trust us when we say that at most hunting (20 - 25 yard) distances, it is of little importance with todays flat shooting bows. 

Keep practicing!
Hunting the Michigan Thumbs agricultural mecca...farm country bucks taste the best.

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fasteddie
 
Posts: 1284
Joined: Sun Apr 27, 2008 1:38 am
Location: Western NY

RE: treestand shot angle

Postby fasteddie » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:14 am

Practice shooting from an elevated position . You won't want to aim at the same spot from a treestand as you would on the ground . Vision where you would the arrow to come out on the other side and shoot . Like stated above , with today's flat shooting bows , you should be okay . But...... practice from some different heights !
Semper Fi !

drdaven
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 5:35 am

RE: treestand shot angle

Postby drdaven » Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:17 pm

Fasteddie,

Couldn't have said it any better.  You have to be aware of the animal positioning and concentrate on the exit wound. 
Above all, literally, Practice Practice Practice!
Hunting the Michigan Thumbs agricultural mecca...farm country bucks taste the best.

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