Treatment of wet bow

Bowhunting experiences, the best way to tune a bow -- share your knowledge here!
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69Viking
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby 69Viking » Mon Oct 27, 2008 7:51 am

A blow dryer works too, just make sure to use the low heat setting if it has one.  If it doesn't have a low heat setting then keep it from getting too close to the parts of the bow that could melt.

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howhill1
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby howhill1 » Thu Nov 06, 2008 12:59 am

ive used one called tetra bow but there are others out there. check your local pro shop or check some archery suppliers online.
"please join the N.R.A. as well as your state rifle association! these are critical times for ALL gun owners. Be informed, be active and stay vigilant"

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howhill1
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby howhill1 » Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:32 am

found this at fs disc. archery
 
http://www.fsdiscountarchery.com/amgtri-flow.aspx
"please join the N.R.A. as well as your state rifle association! these are critical times for ALL gun owners. Be informed, be active and stay vigilant"

wack
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby wack » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:07 am

 There are a few things you can do to your bow case that helps draw moisture away from your bow. Silica packs used to keep metal tools dry work good. Some fill a sock with dry rice, you can dry both in the microwave. I've even seen a guy who lines his bow case with baby diapers and maxi pads. Most bow cases are lined with foam that will store the moisture next to your bow. Anything that you can do to draw moisture away from your bow will help while your bow is in the case. A good wicking material between your bow and foam helps a lot. Your bow case should suck the water off your bow, move water away from your bow and keep water away until you can open it up and dry everything out. Once home, I get my case open so everything can dry.
 It seems to me the parts that rust the fastest are usually the screw heads on the bow. Any rusty screw I find, I remove, clean, and use a good rust converter and then paint black or green. A little finger full of bow wax over each screw also helps. The next thing that rusts fast is the tips of my broad heads. My quivers have foam that holds moisture, got to get the bh's out of the foam and make sure everything dries good too.  If your bh tips rust, sharpen the tip, and put a drop or two of WD40 on just the tip. An old guy I used to know sharpened ever Thunderhead broad head tip, and blued them with gun bluing but a drop of WD40 works for me.
 It's also not just rain and snow you need to be aware of. Taking a bow or gun in and out when it's cold is tough on equipment. A cold bow or gun brought inside will draw and condense moisture. Fog up. Even inside the case. I try to avoid bringing my bow inside when it's cold and I'm hunting every day and also get my bow out of my truck when it's warm. The extreme temperatures inside a vehicle isn't real good for your bow either. 120 degrees will melt the wax right off your string. Anytime you cook a bow in a vehicle, you need to re wax everything and check that anything glued like mole skin, plastic and rubber didn't come loose due to extreme heat.
 I think that's about all I can add to what's been posted already except that if you are hunting in rain, I hope you practiced in rain. I know too many people who haven't mad a practice shot since opening day. Been carrying a bow around for 2 months and haven't shot it. With the weather changing daily, a bow is like a race track, you got to keep up with the changes. Up a tree, over the big one, is not the place you want to discover a squeak in your bow or that your bow shoots 2" higher at 20 degrees temp than 80 degrees temp. or your range is cut in half by a driving rain, even fog can take 5 yards off your max range. Shooting today, is the only way to be sure how you are going to shoot today.
American by birth, hunter by choice.

fireflyparamedic
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby fireflyparamedic » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:44 pm

wack, that seems like great advice. some things seem logical, espically the part of taking your equipment in after being outside in the cold. never really gave it more thought of the different ways of absorbing moisture away from the bow.
firefly

stormshooter4
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby stormshooter4 » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:54 am

All of you have brought up very good points. Points that over 2 years ago I could have applied. My bow brand new never been used Hoyt Ultramag went thru the flood of 06 here in the northeast. It sat underwater for 4 days in the bow case. Even that too was brand new, just purchased 2 weeks before. When I could get to the case, that went out in the sun to dry out after rinsing it with the garden hose. The bow I took a damp/wet sponge and cleaned up everything the best I could. Anything that moved got some gun oil on the part. The cambearings I well oiled all the way around. The screwheads were oiled and the cables waxed. I then let the outfit dry in the air. When I was able to pay attention to it again, I did the exact same thing to the outfit. Having more time to check it out better. What I did must have worked cause of minimal rust on the screwheads is the only damage I see.
  I like being out there before the rain stops cause when it does, they start moving. When I get home, I take a towel to the bow and wipe it all down. Then rewax the strings. Then put it back in the case but leaving it open out in the garage to air out.
  I must be doing something right, it got a 10 pointer almost 2 weeks ago.
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NYarcher
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby NYarcher » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:34 pm

Im with stormy. I wipe mine down, wax the string and hang it in the garage. From the time Archery season begins, my bow never sees a case. lol its either in my hand or hanging up! But I would say that putting bow wax on the screwheads is a pretty good idea. I try not to introduce anything that may have scent. So wax is a great idea.
Venison - the other red meat

ARROWSMITH
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby ARROWSMITH » Fri Nov 14, 2008 7:35 pm

Wow thats alot of good stuff there, I never really thought about keeping my bow case dry.  It sits open in my shop most of the time anyway.  Mabey I'll start tossing those silica packs from shipping cartons and stuff in there.
 
One thing I would stay away from though is the WD-40.  The stuff is made from fish oil and petroleum disstilates, and stinks to high heaven. I don't think I want that on anything I'm taking to the woods with me.

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Jdbllung
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby Jdbllung » Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:14 pm

A friend of mine says to wax the string heavily and then to slowly heat the string with a blow dryer.  Does anybody think there is any benefit to this?
Happiness is a good blood trail! Jeremy W.

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howhill1
 
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RE: Treatment of wet bow

Postby howhill1 » Sat Jan 24, 2009 9:07 am

by gently heating the wax you allow it to soak into the windings of the bow string and completely coat it. the same can be done by taking a piece of leather such as a thumb of a glove.run the leather up and down the string quickly to create heat by friction.
"please join the N.R.A. as well as your state rifle association! these are critical times for ALL gun owners. Be informed, be active and stay vigilant"

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