Another Mountain Lion Sighting

MG11
 
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Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby MG11 » Thu Jan 20, 2011 9:38 pm

I just read that another mountain lion has been spotted in MO. A trail camera took a picture of the cat in a wooded area of Chesterfield MO. For those of you from other states, Chesterfield is a highly populated suburb that is very close to St. Louis. Check out the Missouri Department of Conservation website (www.mdc.mo.gov) to read the article. I hike and bowhunt in this area regularly and am surprised that a predator as big as a mountain lion could live there without being seen. Pretty cool stuff!
A hunt based only on trophies taken falls far short of what the ultimate goal should be... time to commune with your inner soul as you share the outdoors with the birds, animals, and fish that live there. -Fred Bear

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BillHilly
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby BillHilly » Sun Jan 23, 2011 2:00 pm

Hunters shoot mountain lion near Macon
Hunters say animal posed threat. Fourth recent confirmed report brings total to 14 in Missouri since 1994.
KIRKSVILLE Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has confirmed that a group of hunters killed a young male mountain lion west of La Plata, Mo., on Saturday, Jan. 22. According to conservation agents investigating the incident, the group was hunting coyotes on a landowner’s farm when several came within 20 yards of the big cat. None of the hunters had dogs. Members of the group immediately contacted conservation agents to report the incident.
At this time, no charges have been filed since it appears that the cougar presented enough danger to the hunters to warrant the shooting.
Mountain lions are protected under the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The Code does allow the killing of any mountain lion attacking or killing livestock or domestic animals, or threatening human safety. The incident must be reported to the MDC immediately and the intact carcass, including the pelt, must be surrendered to the MDC within 24 hours.
The animal weighed 128 pounds. Members of the MDC Mountain Lion Response Team will examine the animal to gather additional information, including DNA, to help determine where the big cat came from.
This is the second young male mountain lion killed in Missouri this month and the fourth confirmed report of a mountain lion in Missouri since November.
“These four reports bring our total number of confirmed reports over the past 16 years to just 14,” said Rex Martensen of MDC’s Mountain Lion Response Team.
Martensen added that, like in this situation, it appears that mountain lions seen in Missouri are young males roaming from other states in search of territory.
“Young male mountain lions go in search of new territories at about 18 months of age and during this time of year,” he explained. “To date, we have no evidence to suggest that a breeding population of mountain lions exists in Missouri.”
He added that mountain lions are nocturnal, secretive and generally avoid contact with humans.
Mountain lions (Puma concolor), also called cougars, panthers and pumas, were present in Missouri before pioneer settlement. The last documented Missouri mountain lion was killed in the Bootheel in 1927. The closest populations of mountain lions to Missouri are in South Dakota and a small population in northwest Nebraska.
Martensen added that MDC has never stocked or released mountain lions in Missouri and has no plans to do so.
To report a sighting, physical evidence or other mountain-lion incident, contact a local MDC office or conservation agent, or email the Mountain Lion Response Team at mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov.
For more information on mountain lions in Missouri, visit www.MissouriConservation.org and search “mountain lion.”
Born on a mountain raised in a cave Huntin and truckin is what I crave

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BillHilly
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby BillHilly » Sun Jan 23, 2011 2:08 pm

I couldnt shoot a mountain lion (Pussy Cat) cause pappy raised me don't shoot nuttin yo aint gonna eat so if I shot one I'd have to eat a big PUSSY and not just for fun like last time
Born on a mountain raised in a cave Huntin and truckin is what I crave

MoBowman
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby MoBowman » Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:06 am

I believe another one was shot in Mo over the weekend. 4 confirmed sightings since November and 3 killed is the count as of now.
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Rubydog
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby Rubydog » Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:24 am

" To date, we have no evidence to suggest that a breeding population exists in Missouri."

That's the same line of BS all the states use and have used from any animal from bears to lions. Why do the states wait so long before informing the public about wildlife within its borders ?

They don't want to "alarm" us ?

With that many sightings, you can bet lions are breeding in Missouri and other states as well.

MoBowman
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby MoBowman » Sun Jan 30, 2011 2:15 am

Well at this point, none of the Mt. Lions that have been killed in Mo have been female. All young males about 1 1/2 years old. There has been no evidence that there is a breeding population. Lots of pictures on trail cams of the cats but none with young ones. So whoi is to say?
Hunt Hard, Hunt Safe, Pass it on
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bow_junky
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby bow_junky » Mon Jan 31, 2011 2:21 pm

I live northeast of Moberly out by the Boy Scout Camp and I had some St. Louis boys claim to see one during rifle season on the east of me, and then a month later my neighbors wife west of me saw one walk through her back yard at 10 a.m. 40 yrds from the house. Years ago when my uncle lived in this house he swore he heard one "scream and then stalk him back to the house" (doubt that) but there has always been reports out here of cats following the river out of the scout camp.  I think its neat but pray i never run into anything cause i dont pack extra "shorts" while hunting lol 

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vipermann7
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby vipermann7 » Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:07 pm

I've done quite a bit of reading about mountain lions, they've always interested me. No surprise that people spend time in the woods and never one. People can live their whole lives in an area full of mountain lions and never see one, it's just the way they are. There's cats in all kinds of places that people would be surprised to hear about. Sightings get reported all the time, and people are always so shocked. Shouldn't be though, they are some sneaky rascals. I'm in Wisconsin, where a lot of people try to claim theres no way cats could be in some of the places the sightings come from. We're not talking about bigfoot, it's a real life animal that wanders for miles looking for food and a home range, and they do a lot of it at night. Even during the day, they are pretty careful. They don't just lumber around the woods making all kinds of noise. They are much more common than most people think. Not that there are billions of them in every forest, but they're around. I'm just waiting to get a picture of one on my trail camera one day. It would be a little more creepy going to the stand in the dark, but they're already around, so it would just be cool to personally have a sighting.

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clfenimore
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby clfenimore » Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:35 pm

Even though Jeff Beringer, a Conservation Department biologist studying mountain lions, estimates that on any given day, there may not be a single mountain lion in the state and saying that Missouri does not have a permanent, self-sustaining breeding population of mountain lions that we have a few individuals wandering into Missouri from states that do have established populations. He's just speculating from a small amount of evidence.
I think that for every sighting reported there are many others not reported. Several years ago in Cass County I was working on a fence and saw what I at first thought was maybe a big bobcat running down a trail then when it turned to jump in the brush I saw it had a long tail. Then a few months later I saw it again in some tall fescue I didn't report it because I wasn't positive what I saw. When mountain lions do get reported and the investigator doesn’t find any mountain lion sign it gets written off as something else. Although 1,500 recorded sightings have been reported since 1994, only 14 have yielded enough physical evidence to clearly confirm the presence of a mountain lion. How many of those 1500 sightings were mountain lions that left no evidence in that area. The Mountain Lion/Cougar Puma (Felis concolor) a solitary, nocturnal animal - may stake out a range of several dozen square miles, with the size of its area defined largely by the abundance of prey which includes White-tailed Deer. Typically, the male, declaring his ownership by scents, refuses to share his range with other males thus pushing young males out of his range. Causing the young males to migrate and find their own areas. A female may share her range with other females, and she selects a range based, not only on the basis of prey availability, but also on proximity to male ranges and opportunities for mating. The mountain lion tends to use a core area for birthing and resting and an extended area for hunting. I say it's purely speculation to say there are no female mountain lions in Missouri. I'd bet that someday soon the MDC will have no choice than to except the fact that mountain lions are making a comeback on there own here in Missouri just as the Black bear have in the southern half of the state.
If a man cant hunt when he's living how the hell will he hunt when he's dead

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BillHilly
 
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RE: Another Mountain Lion Sighting

Postby BillHilly » Wed Feb 16, 2011 7:25 pm

Missouri Department of Conservation NEWS: Feb. 16, 2011



Linn County sighting confirmed to be a mountain lion



JEFFERSON CITY Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has just confirmed a mountain lion sighting in southern Linn County along the border of Chariton County. A landowner in the area contacted the MDC on Feb. 15 with two photos of a mountain lion taken Dec. 29 by a trail camera on his property.



“The photo is clearly of a mountain lion and we have confirmed the location,” said Jeff Beringer, resource scientist with the MDC’s Mountain Lion Response Team. “It may be wearing a radio collar based on what appears to be an antenna extending from the cat’s neck.”



The Linn County location is about 25 miles from where a mountain was shot and killed in Macon County on Jan. 22. This latest confirmed sighting makes five confirmed reports of a mountain lion in Missouri since November and 15 confirmed reports over the past 16 years.


Beringer said that it appears these mountain lions are young males roaming from other states in search of territory.



“It is very difficult to determine exactly where these individual cats are coming from, but we do know that young male mountain lions go in search of new territories at about 18 months of age and during this time of year,” he explained. “And it makes sense that these big cats could roam into Missouri from the west and use the Missouri river and other river corridors to move throughout the state without being easily detected.”



He added that mountain-lion populations in other states such as Texas, Colorado, South Dakota and Nebraska are growing and that young males are dispersing eastward. Recent confirmed sightings in Nebraska have increased from five in 2004 to more than 30 in 2010.



Beringer said that MDC has no evidence to suggest that a breeding population of mountain lions exists in Missouri, and that MDC has never stocked or released mountain lions in Missouri and has no plans to do so.



Mountain lions are nocturnal, secretive and generally avoid contact with humans.



“We have no documented cases in Missouri of mountain lions attacking livestock, people or pets,” he said. “There is a much greater risk of harm from automobiles, stray dogs and lightning strikes than from mountain lions.”



Beringer explained that the MDC’s Mountain Lion Response Team gets hundreds of calls and emails each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions. When there is some type of physical evidence, the team investigates.



“More than 90 percent of these investigations turn out to be bobcats, house cats, or dogs,” he said. “Our investigations involving claims of pets or livestock being attacked by mountain lions typically turn out to be the work of dogs. And most of the photos we get of mountain lions turn out to be doctored photographs circulating on the Internet.”



Mountain lions (Puma concolor), also called cougars, panthers and pumas, were present in Missouri before pioneer settlement. The last documented Missouri mountain lion was killed in the Bootheel in 1927. The closest populations of mountain lions to Missouri are in South Dakota and a small population in northwest Nebraska.



Mountain lions are a protected species in the state under the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The Code does allow the killing of any mountain lion attacking or killing livestock or domestic animals or threatening human safety. The incident must be reported to the MDC immediately and the intact carcass, including the pelt, must be surrendered to the MDC within 24 hours.

Two recent mountain lion shootings in Macon and Ray counties did not result in charges against the individuals involved because of threats to human safety. A 1994 case involving the shooting of a mountain lion in Carter County for no justifiable reason resulted in the individuals being prosecuted and fined.



“Each situation must be investigated and reviewed on a case-by-case basis and evaluated on its own merit,” explained Beringer. “The Department does not condone the indiscriminate shooting of mountain lions. We acknowledge that people have the right to protect themselves and their property, but simply seeing a mountain lion does not automatically mean there is a threat. We expect people to exercise good judgment and try to avoid confrontations with all wildlife, including mountain lions. Given a chance, mountain lions almost always withdraw from human contact.”



To report a sighting, physical evidence or other mountain-lion incident, contact a local MDC office or conservation agent, or email the Mountain Lion Response Team at mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov.



For more information on mountain lions in Missouri, visit www.MissouriConservation.org.



- END -
Born on a mountain raised in a cave Huntin and truckin is what I crave

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