food plots

Joe G.
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby Joe G. » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:55 am

Thanks for the welcome!!!  I along with my neighbor, who got me started with food plots, have a clover and chicory blend planted as the main plot.  We tried the Winter Rye last year for the first time on the suggestion from my other neighbor who said he has had great success with it.  I have to tell ya, once a hard frost hit the deer and bear mowed it to the ground.  By rifle season in the southern zone came all the plots were to the ground and nothing was left!  So this year we are going to plant some brasicas.  I am looking into the Winter Greens from the Whitetail Institute so the deer have some late season forage.  My friend has been food plotting for some years but just started on the adjoining property to me and this will be my second season planting the plots.  So I am open to suggestions as well as to what works by you.
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reeper0697
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby reeper0697 » Wed Jan 21, 2009 6:04 pm

This post is long and I appoligize.
 
Last spring we planted a bunch of different things (replanted and planted for the first time in some locations). The best thing I found was Imperial Whitetail Clover. (I had so many trail cam pics from there including some nice bucks)
 
We also planted 2 bags of Secret Spot (one came out good the other didnt, did see deer eating both but not for long on the one that didnt come up well)
 
We also had another field with a mix of chickory,clover, and other blends from a local wildlife store (it was right next to the imperial clover and while we got pics in it they were hitting the imperial colver alot harder).
 
In another location I planted Evolved Habit (I forgot what one something about great lakes and it was suppose to be good for northern climate) It was clover and brassicas. I was really excited to try brassicas since they are suppose to become really sweet after a hard frost and deer will eat them and I was hoping they would give me an edge in the late season. They were coming in great but after they got about 6 inches tall or so insects nailed them and they were all gone except for the stem like part so just keep an eye on them if you plant them. The deer would eat at this location at times but not as often.
 
We also planted alfafa right next to my uncles house since there is a big field there. The field is not hunted we just wanted it to draw the deer in our area and stay around. Every night for weeks we had 3 bucks, (a 5pt, 4pt, and spike) and does eating in the field and it was awesome to watch them from the deck. One main thing I recommend is that you use Round Up or a weed killer. My uncle didnt want to use it this field due to the location of his well and alot of other stuff grew back up that the deer werent really eating.
 
I also put in some apple trees (10 if I recall) and put Mossy Oak biologic Green Patch Plus in between them. This wasnt the best soil for the Green Patch Plus and it didnt really come up that great. I did get a few deer cam photos there though.
 
I put in some oats and those seemed to get hit when there was snow on the ground but it was an old seed I had and alot of it didnt come up
 
I think this year I am going to look into turnips (found good info from people on this site) and I will look into the Winter Rye since you had such great success with it
 
 
This is the run down on the food plots we had. They varied in size from X number of square feet to several acres. I hope some of this information will be useful to you. I cant wait for spring to get back out and do some more!
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fasteddie
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby fasteddie » Thu Jan 22, 2009 12:30 pm

I didn't hunt my son's property in Italy Valley (between Potter & Naples) this season but I think he changed his food plot to chickory , clover , peas and a couple other mixes . The 1st year of the plot , we put out Brassica and it worked fairly well . The deer would eat the tops during the summer . It's kind of a beet and tastes bitter but after a couple frosts ,the bitter beet turns to a sugar taste and the deer will dig it up .
The problem with the property is that it is rocky . When we picked up rocks , we found more underneath ........
We also ended up with guys that hunted the adjacent property hunted right on the property line . My son offered to help them put in a food plot on that property but they were to lazy to do it !
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reeper0697
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby reeper0697 » Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:02 pm

fasteddie,
 
any idea how the peas worked out for him?
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fasteddie
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby fasteddie » Tue Jan 27, 2009 3:06 pm

He used a mix of seeds so I can't say what actually attracted the deer . He got nice pics of some bucks during the summer but late summer some bear showed up and no more deer around the property . The bear tore up some of the grapes that had been planted and for some reason they tore up the hay bales that we had for archery backstops .
I hadn't been to the property since early summer
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msbadger
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby msbadger » Wed Jan 28, 2009 12:35 am

reeper....I liked the WTI extreme....one of the main ingredients is burnnet....Google it and you should be able to find it...My seed guy never heard of it last year .....hope to talk him into getting it in sometime....
Little more than most seed ...shop around...I got "dribbled and dunked" by a local Agway last year...buying 2#'s of burnett thru them.... so no more shopping with them...but another Agway near by is pretty good...I get my buckwheat from them when It's..... Ohhh thats a good spot ...and my seed has already arrived....Have fun planting this year ..Hope everything grows tall and lush.....  

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reeper0697
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby reeper0697 » Wed Jan 28, 2009 2:16 pm

I love hearing what people in NY have success with. While at an outdoor expo I must have talked to a guy for an hour on foodplot stuff and a few of the people I was with probably thought we were crazy talking about plants for that long. I would have talked more but we had to go pick up antlers that were getting scored by the NorthEast Big Buck Club.
 
Msbadger, I had that happen to me as well I went to a local seed shop and I had several kinds they hadnt heard of. If I rememer correctly, didnt you say that all your plots start off with buckwheat? How much land do you think you have with plots in them? I love getting out and doing all that stuff. Hope everything grows great for you, especially the bucks!
Put me on a mountain, way back in the backwoods
Put me on a lake with biggin' on the line
Put me around a campfire cookin' something I just cleaned

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fasteddie
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby fasteddie » Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:16 pm

Neil Dougherty has done a lot of work with food plots in Western NY , etc . He has also worked with Charles Alsheimer on some projects . Here is some info on Neil ------

Food Plot Field Days
[/align]The guys at North Country Whitetails teach you how to grow em' right
[/align]By Jeff Waring, Publisher
[/align][/align]

Talk about taking a crash course in food plot science! This past June, I spent a couple of eye-opening days at Craig and Neil Dougherty's North Country Whitetails (NCW). Cut into 500 acres of marginal mountaintop land in south-central New York's Steuben County, not far from Corning, NCW has been transformed into nothing short of a whitetail paradise.


With BioLogic's help, Craig and Neil Dougherty have raised the art of habitat manipulation to its highest level. Besides being a demo center for cutting-edge management practices, NCW is also Mossy Oak BioLogic's Northern Research Facility. This is important because much of what is known about growing food plots for deer has come solely from planting large food plots in the South.


But thanks to NCW and BioLogic, the story of growing small food plots in the North is continuing to emerge. "It doesn't matter whether you have 30 acres or 3,000," said NCW friend and well-known QDM practitioner Charles Alsheimer. "You can do things to benefit deer."


[align=right][/align]And it seems that over the last few years hundreds of habitat management enthusiasts have heeded that advice, visiting NCW for public tours of the facility and seminars given by demo center manager Neil Dougherty. Maybe you even saw NCW last year on Mossy Oak's Hunting the Country, on The Outdoor Channel. In a very short time, NCW has developed into one of the nation's leading supplier's of habitat development and food plot products and services.





Image
Neil can talk all day long about whitetail habitat management and food plots. And he knows what he's talking about, too.
[/align]

"With my passion for education, and Neil's for habitat management and hunting, we've really found our niche," Craig Dougherty said. And based on our weekend at NCW, it's certainly hard to argue that point. With sound Quality Deer Management (QDM), habitat, and food plot practices, these guys took a hunting property that previously produced mostly spikes, fork-horns, and 6-pointers, and turned it into a hotspot for P&Y-class bucks.


As part of our weekend tour of the North Country Whitetails facility, Neil Dougherty arranged for expert classroom seminars on QDM, soil analysis, and the impact of whitetail deer on native habitat. Then we headed to the field to examine woodland, food plot, and sanctuary habitats; plot out and prepare our own food plot; and then plan one of Neil's innovative hunting food plots, which are small, irregular plots designed specifically to give a hunter special advantages. Among those advantages are good wind, cover, proximity to game, and desirable fall plantings like BioLogic's Greenpatch Plus (a mix of wheat, oats, clovers, and brassicas for early bow season) and BioLogic's Maximum (a mix of brassicas for late bow season).


If you can get to North Country Whitetails, I'd highly recommend it. You'll marvel at how the Dougherty's used tools ranging from rakes to chainsaws to ATVs to tractors to bulldozers to create wonderful whitetail habitat. But if you can't make it yourself, don't worry, because you can read all about it in their latest book, Grow 'Em Right: A Guide to Creating Habitat and Food Plots. Don't miss it!


To order your copy, see their ad on page 87, or send $19.95, plus $5.05 postage and handling, to: North Country Whitetails, P.O. Box 925, Fairport, NY 14450. You can also call (585) 388-6990 or order online at www.NorthCountryWhitetails.com.
Semper Fi !

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reeper0697
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby reeper0697 » Wed Jan 28, 2009 4:36 pm

Thanks alot Fasteddie, I appreciate it. I like learning about what works "here" and am checking out the site as we speak. I think it would be great to go on one of the tours.
Put me on a mountain, way back in the backwoods
Put me on a lake with biggin' on the line
Put me around a campfire cookin' something I just cleaned

msbadger
 
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RE: Food Plots

Postby msbadger » Thu Jan 29, 2009 7:34 am

Yes Reeper I do start all plots out in buck wheat...for the reasons I mentioned in other post but also to bring deer into an area to a future food source they may not be use to...ie braccs. ...It  has the ability to release phosphorus in the soil to make it availible to what ever eats it..it helps in not only antler growth but body growth as well and I can say I've seen both....Also when planning small wood land plots as I do ...should I not calculate the available light to that area properly and the crop doesn't thrive ...I've lost little in $....79 cents per # verses 3.00+ per pound...I lost nothing in time for I can always correct the light situation and the BW is a good plow down plot if need be...grows very fast so adjustments can easily be made before fall....
 It's hard to say exactly how much is in plots but here at the house it's between 3-4 acres...12 plots and adding 1 or 2 more  all I can say is what works for me...I plant what does well and research my seed selection carefully....I don't profit in stating what I plant ...other than good hunting....and don't profess to be an expert...but if some of the things I done helps someone else well i think thats great [;)]..Happy planting it's a good thing....Don't forget soft mast plantings as well....You may be surprised at what will grow in N.Y.

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