Climbing Tree Stands

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umpiremark
 
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Climbing Tree Stands

Postby umpiremark » Mon Nov 14, 2011 4:28 pm

I really have (what will appear to be to most ... ) a stupid question.

My son and I are seriously considering climbing stands next year to be more mobile. I will be 56 next year, about 175, not in bad shape, not in the greatest shape. I'm fearful of heights (not scared, just not the most comfortable real high up) and for the last 5 years have hunted mainly in ladder stands. I used to use a climber years ago when I was "a pup." That style stand had a cloth cinch-strap on the climbing metal band around the back of the tree that you locked in when you got to your desired height.

With Summit or API or Ole Man or Gorilla climbers do you still lock in the bottom and top portions once you get up there? If yes, how; with what? It's been 20 years since I've been in a climber and the technology has really changed. Can someone tell me the safest way they "lock in" once the desired height has been reached?

Second, does anyone recommend one climber over another for my age? Why?

Lastly, has anyone ever had the bottom section fall away ascending or decending and should I be concerned with that at 56?

Sorry, but I just don't know ...
One day my ship will come in!! My luck, I'll be at the airport.

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umpiremark
 
Posts: 121
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Re: Climbing Tree Stands

Postby umpiremark » Mon Nov 14, 2011 4:30 pm

Sorry ... I should have explained better. My son and I both bow hunt and gun hunt on the same private property.

If that helps. Thanks!
One day my ship will come in!! My luck, I'll be at the airport.

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Jslotter
 
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Re: Climbing Tree Stands

Postby Jslotter » Mon Nov 14, 2011 4:51 pm

I never used the old school climbers. I own a lone wolf hand climber now for my public land excursions. You lock in the traction belt into the stand platform and seat before you go up. Be sure your climber platform and seat is resting at a good angle, the tree gets smaller in girth as you go up, so doing that compensates for a level platform as you go up. Most new stands come with a DVD, or a comprehensive instruction manual that teaches you the correct posture for your stand. Here is a link to a good video on how modern climbers work. Hope this helps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QD_FgVwJBM
I only hunt on days that end in ' Y '.

windsor
 
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Re: Climbing Tree Stands

Postby windsor » Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:02 pm

I've got a Summit climber and it is my primary stand. I love its versatility and mobility. It locks to the tree via a cable that wraps around the tree and goes into the frame of the climber sections. Its easy to use, does require some upper body strength to climb. The only drawbacks are the need for a straight tree of sufficient diameter and the metal can get "clangy" at times. There are other models of climbers out there that are easier on the body. I know sit-n-climb models are supposedly easier to climb and descend in. There are lots of models to choose from out there. I know most stores will let you try before you buy, so test a few out.

Sopchoppy
 
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Re: Climbing Tree Stands

Postby Sopchoppy » Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:41 pm

I am 62, was 55 when I started deer hunting; ground and ladder stand only. Wanted to get higher up. After days of research, I decided on the Sumitt Ultimate Viper SS. As has been said, the rubber covered cables go around the tree and lock into the top and bottom sections. There is a small rope to tie the top and bottom sections together in case the bottom section falls, you can pull it up and get down. In 4 hunting seasons, I have not had a slip or any other issue. It is by far the most comfortable stand I've seen. Using the climbing bar to sit on, you should not need much upper body; you pull the lower section up with your legs, stand up and raise the top section with arms only, sit on the bar and repeat the process. The only thing I do not like is it's stated weight is 28 lbs. for some reason, mine weighs 30 lbs. and gets heavy hiking in with pack/ gun/ bow. If you are hunting on private property as I do, I leave mine on the tree until I'm ready to relocate. You won't regret buying a Sumitt.

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Bukmastr
 
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Re: Climbing Tree Stands

Postby Bukmastr » Sat Dec 10, 2011 2:38 pm

I am partial to Lone Wolf stands... I am good friends with the origanal owner of the company. I also sell all of there stands on my website. I have and really like the hand climber. But there is a problem with climbing stands and mobility... I am definatly a mobile hunter. I rarly ever hunt the same tree twice in a season, but hunt almost every day of the season till I am tagged out.
I like the hand climber cause of how light it is, but find myself hunting for straight limbless trees more than for deer. Most big bucks that I shoot are shot within 200 yards of there bed, most much closer. The 166 1/8 inch public land buck I arrowed this year I watched get out of his bed 75 yards away and when I shot him at the base of my tree it was almost closing time. Another 50 yards and you would of been out of luck. The point is, I need to be able to get into the exact tree I need to be in. Big bucks usually bed near transitions and where cover meets like at transitions, straight limbless trees are rare.
So I use Lone Wolfs alpha hang-on stand with 4 or 5 sticks... Being that you have a fear of heights I would suggest 4. That will get you to about 18 feet if needed. The sticks convieniantly bungee to the back of the stand.

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