Crossbow question highlights hearings

Dan Salmon
 
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Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby Dan Salmon » Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:54 pm

Here it is, an advisory question at this years meetings.  I'm certain the WBH will be out in force, if you want things the other way, start rounding up your posse.

Spring Hearings are scheduled for April 11 in every county in the state.

http://outdoornews.com/wisconsin/news/article_59871d0e-28a3-11e0-a76c-001cc4c002e0.html

retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:34 am

[font=arial]When forming an opinion about the future of WI Bowhunting laws, one has to think about the past, present and future with the future being the most important. Those not familiar with crossbows may have an image in their minds of a historic or medieval type crossbow being used as a weapon for Bowhunting in WI. If you have not kept up on the advances of these bow/gun like hybrids, you will not know where things are headed. Remember, allowing the old school or medieval type crossbow into the WI archery deer season today is also allowing its far advanced and high tech current versions as well as the future version in 5, 10 years and beyond. During this time, the vertical bow will still only be as powerful as the person able to reach full draw weight meaning the advancements for vertical bows, peaked out 100's of years go. [/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]The crossbow of just a few years ago is not what is coming off the assembly line today. The Archery Trade Assoc show is just recently completed and once again, the advances in the bow/gun like hybrids is pretty striking in terms of power, distance, accuracy, ease of use and lethality. All great things if you are an elderly or handicapped hunter unable to use a bow. The thing with state statues is that nobody wants to keep revisiting the issue as technology advances. Legal descriptions and definitions  remain fairly vague meaning that if the industry calls it a crossbow, then it will be allowed until somebody throws their hands up and says: "wait a minute! This thing needs additional regulation". That is why the future is important and why hunters and lawmakers should take pause if considering such a change. [/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Remember, 1000, 500, 100, 50 years ago and today, the vertical bow is limited by the strength of the archer and his ability to reach peak draw weight with all the associated movement with such an action and to do all this in close quarters to the game they are hunting. The ease and advantages of the modern bow/gun like hybrids is so different that most states allow the elderly and handicapped to use them. (good laws for sure) We hear talk of harvest rates of bowhunters and crossbow hunters in states like Ohio (a one buck state) but again, these are with older style crossbows of 30 years ago and up. Nobody can say what the future will be with crossbow advancements. but the vertical bow remains the same weapon only changing the materials used to make them.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Today, a new advancement is the self cocking crossbow which is not far from the clip or magazine style that will allow easy and fast second and third shots which until now was an argument by the crossbow folks that crossbows are a disadvantage to bows because crossbowers could not easily get a second shot. That barrier has now been erased with an advancement in technology. Other limitations are being erased as time moves forward. Its the nature of the business.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]The advances in crossbow are erasing the disadvantages crossbow supporters list as reasons why crossbow are not all that great and not superior to a bow. View the videos below and ask yourself if the current crossbows are not a superior weapon. Remember, those are the crossbows of today. What will the crossbows of 5 or 10 years from now be capable of? Allowing crossbows into the WI archery season today is allowing their super advanced future versions as well. Here is the self cocking crossbow by Parker.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxebxBBIgkc [/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]The other claims of disadvantage by the pro crossbow folks is the weight, width and clumsiness of crossbows. That may have been true in the past. Today's modern advancements erase those issues. Like other limitations, modern technology will erase them (removing the arguments the crossbow folks use today) Here is a good example. Tecnarm states the following:[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]"SCAR opens up the envelope, succeeds beyond anything that was thought possible and, more importantly in perspective, beyond anything that can physically be achieved by compounds or recurves. "[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Videos[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]http://www.tecnarm.com/video.html[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]http://www.tecnarm.com/ghetrax.html[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]We have seen what happened when the ML season started as a primitive weapon season, then we saw the advancements with scopes and then inlines and their lethality and effectiveness. Here is the inline crossbow.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeGnXLaZdS4[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Here is the current (but soon to be old school and old tech) bow/gun like hybrid that couples an AR 15 rifle with a crossbow.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5nVSfv0Rlg[/font][/align]

retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:34 am

[font=arial]When policy makers consider legislation, they consider the future as well as today. When forming your opinion on crossbows in the WI archery deer season, consider the future. Consider why it is that bowhunters enjoy  a long season. Its because we are limited in our ability to harvest game. In 2009, WI bowhunters (for the first time ever) killed 30% of the total buck harvest and that's with vertical bows of today and a very small number of crossbows used by elderly and handicapped folks. (a great law) That point is not missed by the gun hunters lamenting their poor seasons and harvests of the last few years. If you're a Bowhunter thinking about the future of the sport, tagging allowances, season length, the deer herd, etc. Think about the future of weaponry and future success rates. What will these bow/gun like hybrids mean to the future of the sport if allowed into the WI archery deer season?[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]The advancements in crossbows are out of this world in terms of power, Kinetic energy down range, Accuracy, lethality, ease of use, etc. What crossbowers like to term as limitations and disadvantages in crossbows are quickly disappearing. They truly are a superior weapon in every sense of the term.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Case in point. If the fellow in the video shooting Rolaids were to hand that bow/gun like hybrid to any other person off the street and offered them the chance to hit that same target but at the same time handed them a vertical bow also sighted in for that distance and asked them to hit the target, which weapon is the person most likely to hit the mark with? Its clear the crossbow is the hands down superior weapon.  The point is the effectiveness and lethality of the modern (by today's standards) bow/ gun like hybrids vs bows. No data exists showing the differences between these new weapons and bows. We only have data for older crossbows.  [/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]Let's say we arm 50 WI gun hunters (the most likely person to crossover to the crossbow) with these super bow/gun like hybrids and 50 other WI gun hunters with vertical bows and then unleash them in the deer woods. Which group of do you suppose will have the higher success rates? There is a reason some folks don't take up Bowhunting. Its hard, its challenging and requires practice/skill to succeed. At the same time, WI archery deer license sales continue to rise to near record levels. Allowing these new bow/gun hybrids to everybody will certainly have an effect on the deer herd and season structure and tagging and season length. We know because with the 30% buck harvest rate bowhunters hit last year with vertical bows (for the first time ever), there were already calls to shorten the season, limit harvest and take away the antlerless tag from bowhunters. These are negative changes to the archery deer season and to bowhunters.
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retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:49 am

[font=arial]WI hunters have and continued to oppose the full inclusion of these bow/gun like hybrids within the archery deer season. WI DNR mail surveys and Conservation Congress spring hearings asking WI residents about full inclusion of crossbows have never been supported by the majority of WI residents asked and are rejected each time the question is brought up. This year it will be asked again simply because attendance is low and they need the controversy to boost attendance.[/font][/align] [/align][font=arial] In the last two years hunters marched on Madison to decry the deer herd situation and the desire of the WI DNR to reduce harvest and seasons (especially EAB rules). WI Policy makers are kept aware of the situation. The desire to reduce tags for WI bowhunters and shorten the season for bowhunters come from a concern for the resource, season structures and tagging allowances. The current list of legal weapons in WI has proven more than capable of reducing ( actually over-reducing) the deer herd. What is broken about WI deer hunting is not the lack of weapons choices. It is unrealistic (too low) goals, Predators (of several varieties), Too many seasons, etc. that has lead to an adversarial relationship between hunters and the WI  DNR. This is spilling over into strained relations between WI bowhunters and WI gun hunters. Policy makers  are keenly aware of these issues as well as the fact that the archery deer season is the bright spot in hunting license sales in WI. Wisconsin does not suffer for lack of hunter numbers. Our numbers are increasing every year. What in that needs fixing?? [/font][/align] [/align][font=arial]In states with low bowhunter participation, and over abundant deer herds in need of reduction and a desire by the majority of hunters to include these bow/gun like hybrids,  Lawmakers in those states might consider such a change but there is nothing about the WI archery deer season that is in need of fixing. Lack of weapons allowed in the WI archery deer season or lack of bowhunters is not a problem that needs correcting. In 09, gun hunters had the worst season in about 30 years while WI bowhunters killed the 4th highest number of bucks. That point was not missed by WI gun hunters (400,000 of which are not bowhunters). DNR data shows that WI bowhunters accounted for 30% of the total WI buck harvest in 2009. This is a record and is just an extension of the current trend. This is not good news for gun hunters. [/font][/align][font=arial][/font] [/align][font=arial]With calls for taking the rut from WI bowhunters by moving the gun season up as well as the attempt last year to strip the antlerless tag statewide and permanently from bowhunters and the days lost to bowhunting when many units prohibit antlerless harvest as well as being a victim of our own successes with the high harvests bowhunters currently have and all this taking place WITHOUT adding crossbows tells WI resident hunters that adding crossbows is not a fix or a solution since there is no problem that currently exists without allowing them beyond what is currently legal for the elderly and handicapped. WI hunters understand that the deer situation (problems) in WI will not be aided or fixed or improved by allowing the bow/gun like hybrids into the archery deer season. One needs to expand their horizons and think on a state wide scale and outside the vacuum of just the guy on the next 40 over. That is what WI hunters have been doing and continue to do every times they are asked the full intrusion question in regards to crossbows. These points and the opinions of WI resident hunters steer lawmakers. As a Bowhunter in WI, have you contacted your lawmaker to tell him that crossbows are a bad Idea? If not, its in the best interest of the sport to do so.
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retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:50 am

Aside from all the points already made is one that is constantly overlooked and that is the super gun/bow hybrids on the market today are nothing compared to what they will be in a few years. Strength, Speed, KE and capability are nearly unlimited. Allowing these super powerful gun/bow hybrids of today is allowing their far superior versions in the future. The reason the capabilities are near limitless for the gun/bow hybrid is that it is not drawn or held by human muscle power. Using cranks and machine type locks to hold the draw and released with an integral trigger with a safety mean draw weights, speed, KE and range can continue to increase. (and will)
 
At the same time, the bow and arrow met its maximum ability the day it was invented. Since day one, the bow has had to be drawn and held with only the human power of the archer meaning maximum weight was established when the bow was invented and is limited by the strength of the archer. If you are only able to draw 60 pounds, that is the max. you can use. Draw weights of 55 to 75 are the super majority of bowhunting rigs today as they have been for decades and cant be increased since archers wont be able to draw them. bowhunting as defined in WI statute is a limited power, speed, range, KE type of endeavor.
 
Crossbows however are already exceeding 200 lbs of draw and will increase. Likewise, these super gun/bow hybrids like the TAC 15 are producing speed and KE exceeding that of bows and arrows. This extends shot range necessitating precautions such as you mentioned.
 
See the link for the report on long range hunting (100 yards) in regards to the PSE TAC 15 gun/bow hybrid. Since the modern crossbow hunter will almost certainly hunt and shoot with a rest or rail, this will have dramatic effects on range and lethality (kill numbers)
 
http://www.longrangehunting.com/articles/pse-tac-15-15i-10-10i-crossbow-review-1.php
 
This type of gun/bow hybrid, shot from a rest or rail of a blind or ladderstand with greatly extended range and ability are of concern to bowhunters and gun hunters alike because of the effects to the resource and what it will mean to the tagging and season structure of the archery deer season. A season that is not broke or in need of fixing.

retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:52 am

Its clear that the for-profit crossbow makers fail to understand or care about the WI situation as they seek to tap another market in another state simply for the $$$$. They have no concern for WI laws and the reasons WI hunters oppose allowing crossbows in the archery deer season in our state.
 
What they don't know is that there are those already seeking to shorten the WI archery deer season even as we speak. WI hunting orgs are working non-stop to prevent those negative changes. WI Bowhunters have fought long and hard for the season structure 250,000 WI bowhunters enjoy. The gun hunters especially are unhappy with the harvest of bowhunters with currently allowed weapons. There have been those seeking to shorten the WI archery deer season and those seeking to take away the rut and move the gun season up and others who have sought to strip bowhunters statewide of the antlerless tag (thankfully we fought that off last year).
 
With the WI deer herd in such dire straits and with many areas closed off to any antlerless harvest, the deer herd is stretched quite thin. The DNR would like the money and will simply shorten the season if need be (as is already being suggested) or take away tags (which is already happening) All of these things are taking place with the current number of bowhunters (near record highs) and our currently legal weapons allowed and because of the number of deer we bowhunters take. Adding crossbows exacerbates these problems and speeds us towards negative changes to the archery deer season. It all about the resource. That is the primary reason the majority of bowhunters asked , oppose the crossbow in the WI archery deer season, because of the many negatives to the herd and the season structure.
 
Its been stated that the WI DNR has said:
 
"From our perspective, it's a social issue and not one that would affect deer harvest,"
 
The public has been asked several times in fact, this matter when statewide to hunters in 2005 and was defeated by a 2:1 margin. Pretty clear evidence of their opinions you would say. Beyond that, what the DNR actually means (if you ask the question) is that if overharvest in the archery deer season ever became a concern, tags would be striped and season days would be removed to adjust. (That is how they can say this wouldn't affect the deer herd and they are right because to manage the herd, they simply remove tags and days. OPPORTUNITY LOST for all bowhunters) How do we know? Because it has started already (WITHOUT CROSSBOWS) Due to the declining deer herd, last year, bowhunters lost both tags and days afield. 19 DMU's prohibited any antlerless harvest in hopes to restore the herd. Bowhunters could not kill an antlerless deer. (opportunity lost) During the statewide Dec. antlerless hunt, only antlerless deer could be harvested, since many units prohibited any antlerless harvest and only antlerless deer could be killed, bowhunters were not allowed to hunt those days (days of hunting lost, the season was shortened) And all of this without adding crossbows. How does adding crossbows help the situation??
 
 Logic insists that adding crossbows and the additional hunters and the harvest will speed us to more of what we are already seeing in terms of negative changes. These truths are self evident. We hear from the for-profit crowd that not a single tag or season day has been lost due to crossbows in other states but those states are not WI. That's great for others states that don't have the WI deer herd issues we have but their claim doesn't apply here since we are already seeing these problem without adding crossbows so adding them means more opportunity lost.

Its clear that this has never been about keeping people out of the woods as the pro-crossbow folks claim, (all are welcome and none are prohibited from the WI archery deer season) Our state clearly defines bowhunting and crossbow hunting (for the elderly and handicapped). Nobody is kept out of the woods. That is a hollow and straw argument being sold by the pro-crossbow (Mfgr that want to tap a market in another state) crowd.  Its about the resource and the season structure and tags .
 
This is about ensuring the days of WI archery deer hunting are not lost for all bowhunters and that tagging opportunity is not lost to all bowhunters and that people do not drop out of the sport if those things should ever take place. Its about the sharply declining deer herd and the season structure and the hunters in WI. Bowhunting is a sport not seeing a decline in recruitment and retention and our numbers continue to rise. If bowhunters leave the sport its not for lack of weapons choices but rather due to lack of access to places to hunt, declining deer numbers as well as lack of time (jobs, family, other interests) Adding crossbows dos not fix problems with land access or low deer numbers and lack of time to hunt. Adding crossbows does not fix what is not broken with the WI archery deer season

This is a perfect example of what I have been  saying . From this issue of WIsconsin Outdoor News and a retired biologist. Remember, ye is talking about compounds and longbows and recurves. He is lamenting our success with currently legal bows. What will adding CROSSBOWS of today anf the future mean to the WI archery deer season?
 
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retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:54 am

One very common point that the crossbow industry trys to sell is the youth aspect, stating that crossbows will recruit youth into hunting as if crossbows and only crossbows can do such a thing. WI residents know that currently WI youth have nearly unlimited opportunity to engage in hunting and are not kept from the woods. Youth in WI as young as ten can hunt the:
 
Youth gun deer hunt in Oct.
 
Oct. T-zone gun deer hunt
 
Nov. Gun deer hunt
 
Dec. Muzzleloader deer hunt
 
Dec. T-zone deer hunt
 
Spring and all Turkey hunts
 
Fall, small game season (rabbits, squirrels, etc)
 
Fall upland bird hunting (pheasants, grouse, dove)
 
Fall Waterfowl hunting (ducks, geese)
 
To claim youth in WI are kept from hunting is a straw man argument of distraction and one WI hunters won't fall for. WI is a hunting state bar none. In deer hunting alone, they have 30 days over several months in all types of WI weather to take up hunting. Small game, Turkey, upland and waterfowl offer months of hunting time over the fall. To assume youth won't take up hunting dues to lack of access to crossbows defies logic and is really an unfortunate and dubious claim.
 
Parents lives and jobs, lack of access to hunting land, declining deer herds, the plethora of options kids today have, etc. are the clear limiting factors to getting kids into hunting, not a lack of weapons choices. That is one of the weaker straw arguments from the for-profit crossbow community and is folly that is easily debunked. Everything Just stated for youth applies equally for women. Hunting opportunity in WI abounds in our state.
 
Kids that get into archery and bowhunting practice and build not only the strength required to bowhunt (30 lb draw weight in WI ) but also build the skill and patience required for such a sport. For those not interested in such things as practice and patience and effort vs reward, odds are, bowhunting is not something they will gravitate towards anyway. Youth able to handle a bow with the killing power required can start as early as ten. This (and the sport of bowhunting itself) requires practice just like the many and varied sports kids enjoy or the other activities they engage in.
 
dumbing down the standards defeats the reasons people get into bowhunting to begin with. The for-profit crossbow folks just want to sell more crossbows. That is the driving force behind any suggestion of change to Wi law and no other reason. To think they make hunting crossbows for youth is silly. Vertical archery makers manufacture youth bows to aid kids into bowhunting which is another reason nobody is excluded from the WI archery deer season.

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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:54 am

Also part of the discussion is the elderly hunter. As far a elderly hunters go, the 2009 WDNR bowhunter mail in survey shows the following info on bowhunter age demographics.
Age group...... Percent of bowhunting pop.
 
12-18.................5%
 
10-30.................11.8%
 
31-45................28.2%
 
46-65..................45.5%
 
66+..................9.5% (even though they have unlimited access to crossbows and perhaps more free time than most hunters)
 
The report states that the average age of a WI bowhunter is 46. Crossbows are allowed for the 65and up crowd yet there is a huge drop in bowhunters 66 and up and these folks have unlimited access to crossbows and time to hunt and what do we see.................................... lack of weapons choices is NOT a factor in WI hunter partispation.

retch sweeny
 
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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 8:56 am

After spending a little more time reviewing the Tecnarm version of the gun/bow like hybrid that was at this year's ATA show, its pretty clear that the crossbow of today is nothing like those of just 5 years ago. Not only that but it removing the negatives and claims of disadvantage by the pro crossbow folks is the weight, width and clumsiness of crossbows. That may have been true in the past. Today's modern advancements erase those issues. Like other limitations, modern technology will erase them (removing the arguments the crossbow folks use today) Here is a good example. Tecnarm states the following:
 
"SCAR opens up the envelope, succeeds beyond anything that was thought possible and, more importantly in perspective, beyond anything that can physically be achieved by compounds or recurves. "
 
Videos
 
http://www.tecnarm.com/video.html
 
http://www.tecnarm.com/ghetrax.html
 
Allowing the crossbow of today (as seen above) into the WI archery deer season is also allowing the crossbow of 5 years from now and 10 (Its anybody's guess what they will be capable of) into the WI archery deer season. One must think about the future and the effects of technology on the sport.
 
The compound of today and tomorrow will only be as powerful as I am strong. Throughout history, the vertical bow was maxed out by the strength of the archer's own arms and back and his ability to reach the peak draw weight. If 50, 60 or 70 pounds is all he can muster, then he is as limited as the archer of 1000 years ago. All the related motion to reach and hold that draw and to let it up should the shot not present itself and having to go through that effort all over again limits the vertical archers lethality and ability. This not true when using these bow/gun like hybrids. A great deal of caution is needed when considering changing WI hunting laws and an emphasis on the future is most critical.

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RE: Crossbow question highlights hearings

Postby retch sweeny » Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:02 am

Here is a lighter hearted look at the crossbow situation that still makes a very good point.
 
The pro-crossbow crowd says that because a crossbow has two limbs, a string and launches a fletched shaft that it is the same as a bow and that is should be allowed to participate equally with bows during Bowhunting seasons.
 
We all know this is a bow.
 
Image
 
And we know this is a bow.
 
Image
 
Both have to be drawn and held by the muscle power of the archer at the time of the shot and in the presence of game. Those two attributes make executing a Bowhunting harvest attempt on game what it is.
 
A the same time, we all recognize this as a gun. We can clearly see that this is not a bow. In fact, it's an AR-15 assault rifle stock and receiver.
 
Image
 
So modifying the other end of this gun with this.
 
Image
 
So that you have this.
 
Image
 
does not make it a bow any more than adding an outboard motor to the other end would make it a boat or adding a spinning blade would  make it a lawn mower............
It's a modified rifle/bow hybrid and as such, has no place in the WI archery season except for the elderly and handicapped as a way to offer them the advantages of its superior atributes. If it were not easier and more advantagous to the elderly and handicapped, they wouldn't be allowed but the facts are that the crossbow and its superior attributes make it a viable choice for the elderly anf handicapped that can't use a bow but would still like to be in the woods during the WI archery season.
 
The crossbow crowd insists that it belongs in the woods equally with bows and bowhunters and as ridicules as that sounds, that assurtion makes these comparisons equally valid. .50 ca. Machine guns should be allowed to participate in trap and skeet events because both have a barrel and use gunpowder to fire a projectile.
 
Image
 
Motorcycles should be allowed to compete in the Tour De France race since both have two wheels, a seat, handlebars and carry a rider.
 
Image
 
Jet skis must then certainly be allowed to participate equally with canoes since they both have a hull, seats and both are a watercraft that carries people.
 
Image
 
chainsaws ought to be allowed to participate in lumberjack competitions against buck-saws since both, Have a handle, a blade with teeth and are used for cutting wood.
 
Image
 
And that F-16 jets should be allowed to participate equally in Ultra light plane events since both have an engine, wings, c0ckpit and can fly and require a pilot.
 
 
Image
 
If the pro-Crossbow crowd thinks a crossbow belongs in the same season as bow, then it's understandable that all these other comparisons make sense and that allowing advanced devices to participate equally with their lesser counterparts should be acceptable since they say they are practically the same anyway. They claim that user groups are just being elite and selfish by not allowing advanced devices to share equally and participate with lesser equipment but we know better and so do they.
 
The PSE TAC-15 crossbow pictured above is married to an AR-15 Assault rifle and is for sale right now but crossbow makers are still in the infancy of crossbow design. The bow/gun hybrid of today will only get more sophisticated, powerful and advanced meaning that allowing the crossbow of today into the archery season is also allowing the gun/bow hybrids of the future into the archery season but by then, it will be too late to take these weapons out.
 
No matter how advanced a vertical bow gets, it still has to be drawn by human power to it's peak weight in the presence of game. For that reason, maximum draw weights have not advanced in centuries since it's all based on your own strength and ability to pull the bow to it's peak weight. Because of this, arrow speeds are limited.
 
Should a bowhunting shot not present itself, the archer has to use his human power to let the draw down and then repeat the cycle again in the presence of game. This is not true of crossbows. Stocked, cocked and locked means the very essence of bowhunting's final and most important step (and what differentiates it from making an attempt to harvest game with a rifle) is now converted to a firearms style of mechanics, removing the key component to taking game with human powered archery gear . Since there is very little to limit the power and speed of future crossbows that can be cocked with a crank, the crossbows of today are still in their infancy and near limitless in terms of draw weight and speeds thus increasing range and killing power. Because they can be shot off a bench rest or shooting rail, even the very act of a steady hold using human power to aim has been converted to a firearms style of shooting from a braced position.
 
The draw, speed, rest aim, stocked, cocked, locked and shoulder fired crossbow that requires a person to shoulder the weapon, lean into a scope, flip off a safety and pull the trigger are not the movements, actions or physical requirements of the hunting archer and provides advantages reducing the skill set to simply firing a stored energy weapon at game.
 
Is there a place in the woods for the crossbow? Yes, the elderly and handicapped are able to participate on par with able bodied bowhunters  through the unique advantages and superior capabilities provided by the crossbow.  That advantage is granted to them based on their limited physical abilities to participate in bowhunting. The same could be said for seasons that already allow shoulder fired, cocked, stored energy devices since the crossbow mimics those weapons except for the smoke and bang.

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