chainsaw

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msbadger
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby msbadger » Tue May 08, 2012 10:52 am

Well nothing much to add to that advise...other than make sure your cleaning the saw and making sure your oil is flowing good....I've been cutting our blk locust for fence posts I'm installing and it is a killer on chains...as bad as the iron wood we have....It tends to make a fine almost dust shaving unlike the maples and ash I cut...gumming up the saw causing me to field clean often...I always have 4 chains and rotate them out to be sharpened....also making sure your chain has the proper tension is on the check often list..
Romans 14:10
Romans 14:13
James 4:11
Luke 6:37

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jonny5buck
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby jonny5buck » Tue May 08, 2012 2:34 pm

Thanks again for all the good advice....Ms badger- That blk locust is just unreal to cut cant believe how hard that stuff is .one property i hunt is becoming over-run with it..those trees must have a 90% success rate at reproducing!!

Might pick-up another chain to have a few on hand,seems like the smart thing to do-happy cutting folks :mrgreen:

msbadger
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby msbadger » Wed May 09, 2012 2:52 pm

Problem is just like beech and poplar...once you cut a mature tree...the roots sucker like mad and send up new trees every where...to avoid that ..if you don't want them as a renewable resource....hit the stumps with a good brush/tree killer ;) Ever cut iron wood? dang you'll see sparks flying on those...I'll only cut that in the winter or after good rains
Romans 14:10
Romans 14:13
James 4:11
Luke 6:37

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JPH
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby JPH » Wed May 09, 2012 3:30 pm

This is all I have to offer to this thread:
4270148140.jpg
4270148140.jpg (43.3 KiB) Viewed 561 times

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kellory
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby kellory » Wed May 09, 2012 4:10 pm

I have two chainsaws, both gifts from different people, and different brands. Both are 14 inch models, and their chains are interchangeable. I have 4 chains total, My bobcat is used and leaks(needs a new fill plug) and runs once if finally starts. My Poulan, has already been rebuilt twice, due to overheating. It did it the first time while on the first gal. of mixed fuel. They supply the 2.5 ounce bottle of oil for mixing with the first gal. And yet they tried to say I had run it with too little oil! They backed down in a hurry, when I told them it was still on it's first gal. of fuel! Mechanic said that it was best to over do the oil, with 4 oz per gal. He claimed it may smoke some, and it might foul a plug once in a while, but the motor will never need to be rebuilt again.i don't believe the last, but that is what I was told.I will change out the chain any time it shows it is dulling, and the swapped out chain will get sharpened.(3-4 dollars) Between them, they have claimed the lives of more than 30 mature trees and countless small trees. 22 of those trees belonged to my Father in Law. (straight-line winds) and I will be felling a few this summer to form a cascade on my hunting property. (if time and weather allow) Best thing I can tell you about chainsaws is never let a moving chain touch dirt, never force a cut (let the chain due the work, never let the chain get dry (oil) heat destroys them. And never, never forget that that saw is an omnivore, and it will eat you faster than it eats trees. A buddy of mine has an older saw with the shut off switch on the cutting face of the machine. He released the rear handle to shut it off, and the saw pivoted in his grip from the top handle. The blade "touched" his leg above the knee, and he will bear the scars until the day he dies. 1/2 in wide and @ 5" long and he is lucky he will not have a limp, just the scar. He tells people he was bit by a shark ;) Because he does not want to even talk about it. If you don't use wedges, I would recommend the practice. It keeps the cut from being able to close and bind your chain. Plastic ones are made for the purpose, but I use my splitting wedges, since I already have 4 of them. As for chains, I would recommend at least two spares. That way you have a fresh one on the saw, a spare to change out, and the dull one being sharpened.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

msbadger
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby msbadger » Sun May 13, 2012 6:29 am

Yep ...just like a safety harness for climbing up, to hunt....a good safety hat with ear and face protection and a good pair of Kevlar chaps....second thing to pick up before heading to the register with a chain saw... ;)
Romans 14:10
Romans 14:13
James 4:11
Luke 6:37

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jonny5buck
 
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Location: Land of Lincoln

Re: chainsaw

Postby jonny5buck » Sun May 13, 2012 7:21 pm

@JPH- who's in the photo??....cool anyway.. :)

@ kellory& msbadger- Confession time... The stihl saw i use ..and have been using .....has no kickback bar...none ....it was broken off when i acquired it- :?: ......I also just purchased a new chain [stihl brand of course] but the yellow label on the side says it has a high kickback rate ...the stihl guy said it cuts a wider gap ..but beware of the kickback....i usually cut with a hooded sweatshirt a pair of good gloves and just sunglasses.....rather than tempt fate..i will be getting this fixed first....i like my face the way it is--- :shock: ....

After reading this thread i realized i do NOT want to be ''that guy'' ...we all ask ...''what was he thinking???....


Thanks for the reality check..Jon` :|

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JPH
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby JPH » Sun May 13, 2012 8:36 pm

jonny5buck wrote:@JPH- who's in the photo??....cool anyway.. :)

I have no idea. It was just something random I found on the internet.

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kellory
 
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Re: chainsaw

Postby kellory » Sun May 13, 2012 10:33 pm

J5B, anytime I can help, just ask.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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