Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

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Jon H.
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Jon H. » Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:50 pm

First of all, I wont be sitting in any woods walker's stands! I have the same problem with a land owner. So I use a climber and glow tacks. And now I don't have any problems.

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Ifishandhunt
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Ifishandhunt » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:12 pm

Ha Woodsy! LOL
Well where I come from in NJ, the 3 S's may have similar meaning :lol:

I think I will stick with my version of the 3 S's ;)

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Scoutfish
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Scoutfish » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:24 pm

I'd definantly talk to him, but first give him the benefit of doubt that he man may not have known it was your stand and could have possibly thought it belonged to the landowner....thus thought he was welcome to use it.

JUst saying, his actions could have been non hostile and just a matter of a mistake.


I'd bring a can of spray paint and a stencil though.....the landowner could possibly extend the same invitation to a 3rd or 4th person too.

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JPH
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby JPH » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:26 pm

It's an odd situation when your stands are on property that you do not own. I certainly agree that sitting in another hunter's stand without his/her express permission is a slob move, but hunting on someone else's property means that you may have to suffer slobs. Telling off a hunter for sitting in your stand may put you on the wrong side of the landowner who does not see a problem with such things. Personally, I would not take that risk.

Whenever I encounter the possibility that someone may be hunting my stands I go to what I call "seatless sets". By that I mean that I will put in steps or ladders and trim all the shooting lanes but I will pack my ultralight portable in and out with me as I go.

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Woods Walker
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Woods Walker » Mon Nov 26, 2012 8:33 pm

Ifishandhunt wrote:Ha Woodsy! LOL
Well where I come from in NJ, the 3 S's may have similar meaning :lol:

I think I will stick with my version of the 3 S's ;)


I was born and raised in NJ........"FUGHETTABOUTIT!!!" :mrgreen:
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
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Ifishandhunt
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Ifishandhunt » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:43 pm

JPH - That is my feeling as well. The land owner is an old guy who can be cranky at times and he has had problems with trespassers/poachers on his land (who shot his horse and killed his cat). I can see him getting annoyed and kicking us off his land for good. It is so hard to get permission to hunt private land. I love this place, it is has been great to me for the past 7 or so years and I have learned a lot about hunting while being there. His wife passed away about a year ago and at that time he kicked me off out of spite (because his wife kicked off one of his friends---who was drinking while hunting and almost shot me...twice) and told me get my stands off his land. I came back the very next day to get my stands and he had a change of heart and told me I could hunt his land and even asked for the hunting permission form that the DNR has private land owners sign. He told me he would only allow me and this other guy to hunt and that the drunk would not be back.

Anyway, this hunter knows the ladder stands are mine plus one hang-on stand. The land owners daughter (who originally got me permission to hunt there years ago) doesn't like the guy but for some reason her dad does. So it is like walking on egg shells. I will probably see this guy in January during muzzle loader season. At that time I will mention to him that I prefer him not using my stands. And if I happen to walk up on him and he is in my stand, I think I will ask him politely to get out of the stand. He is the one 'in the wrong' and it is my tree stand so I hope he doesn't cry to the land owner. Some how I will have to figure out how to lock out the stand or make it so nobody can sit in it.

The other annoying aspect is I do all the pre-season work, clearing lanes, cutting brush, keeping scent free as much as possible, being careful how I enter and exit the stand areas, etc. This guy does nothing to help but reaps the benefits of my labor.
Last edited by Ifishandhunt on Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Woods Walker
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Woods Walker » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:50 pm

You know, reading through this thread I just realized that I now have another good reason for ground hunting in a ghillie suit as opposed to using treestands. Now, in addition to less costly, easier, FAR less weight and CHEAPER, I can now add.......

MUCH LESS DRAMA!!!! :mrgreen:
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
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mhouck06
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby mhouck06 » Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:20 am

kellory wrote:Shaman has the right of it, with one exception. I believe the rule on public lands (at least here) is first come first served. If a stand is unoccupied, it can be used.


Rule or not.. there is etiquette..

We took two sections of ladder down.. he brought in his own.
I guess I give him credit.. he did do some work.
Looking back now, I laugh.... kind of.
Its all part of the game.. I just like when people play nice.
1 stand on a couple hundred acres is not too much... Right?

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Woods Walker
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:08 am

Etiquette? On public land?

If you are going to rely on etiquette, then you are going to be SADLY disappointed. I've been sadly disappointed with the etiquette I've experienced on private land with other hunters who had permission to be there, not trespassers!

To me, on public land it should be no different than fishing. Who ever gets to the spot first get's to fish it. If you lave a chair there to "claim" your spot then don't be shocked or upset if it gets moved, or someone's sitting in it. At that point all you can reasonably ask him to do is to get out of the chair so you can take it to the new place where you are going to fish. You don't own the ground that chair is sittting on.

This is today's world. Stands will be used. Trail cams WILL BE STOLEN. Fact of life.
Hunt Hard,

Kill Swiftly,

Waste Nothing,

Offer No Apologies.....

>>>--------------------------------->
NRA Endowment Life Member

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Ohio farms
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Ohio farms » Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:52 pm

What is it that this guy does not understand? It's not an issue of etiquette. He come upon a tree stand, that is not his, and he just uses it?
It's like the guy who hunts on private land and trespasses and says as a defense. "I didn't know it was private property. It was not posted." Who's do you think it was that owned it? You know it's not YOURS. Jerk. It was not his stand, where does he get off using it. (on opening day, no less).
As for the solution, I'd bite my tongue and explain to him what, I'm sure, his mother taught him when he was a child, to not take other people's things.
Sorry for venting, but I just came back from two days at my farm dealing with a trespasser and a neighbor's pit bull who decided that my deer lying by the barn was his. My 38 was in the house or WWs' three "S" would have been in effect. ( The dog, not the trespasser)
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

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