Brand New Hunter

What's the hunt looking like this year in your area? Share!
User avatar
shaman
 
Posts: 2496
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 12:38 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby shaman » Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:35 am

MsDachshund wrote:Just wanted to say hello and my daughter and I are wanting to learn how to deer hunt. We are as green as they come. We don't know where to begin, what we need to have, or where to go. No one takes us seriously because, get this, "we are too attractive to hunt". Like that has something to do with with hunting! I know other women hunt and being "un attractive" is not a requirement. So, anyway, please send us advice we need all we can get. Oh, if it matters we are in Davidson county, North Carolina .


First off, get a hold of the rulebook for NC and both of you all read it cover-to-cover.

http://www.ncwildlife.org/Hunting/LawsSafety.aspx


Second, get thee to hunter education. A lot of your questions will be answered . It is probably mandatory for the two of you anyway.

Third: Find someone to take you hunting the first time. There is a lot to learn, and hands-on teaching is still the best way. If you cannot find anyone who will do it, see if you can get someone to come by and help you simulate a hunt. That is, set up a blind in the back yard and watch deer at home or at a park or whatever.

Fourth: Start watching deer. Go out to a county park or a friend's back yard and get acquainted with how deer operate.

Deer are not all that hard to kill. Oftentimes it is just the logistics of getting to them and knowing what to do when you get there that gets in the way.

Have fun. Write soon. Write often.

BTW: I have a lot of info for beginning hunters at my weblog. See my signature line.
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
Confessions of a Cervid Serial Killer
Image

MsDachshund
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:37 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby MsDachshund » Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:55 pm

Ok evevry one thank you so much for giving us all the information! We went to Gander Mtn Store and started looking at rifles. We talked several people there and got a lot of useful information. We also stopped by Walmart (I hate Walmart needless to say) and did talk to people there and we surprising given lots of useful information and a booklet. Looks like so far what we learned is we need to take a special course that is a one day, 10 hour session and it is free. So we are excited about doing that and then we can get our hunting lic for our area. We also have been looking at Sportsman's guide and Bass Pro for gear and what not. I have my own land to hunt on, I have 80 acres of woods and lots of deer. So that part is covered. We are so excited!!! We will keep you guys posted on our progress.

User avatar
Sierra
 
Posts: 268
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:03 pm
Location: Delaware, Ohio

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby Sierra » Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:52 pm

I think so too, Woods. At least I hope so, that more women will hunt. I admit that this original post turned me off my its content, as being a little rude in a way to other women hunters, but I decided to ignore that. I still wonder if it's genuine or not. But that's neither here nor there.

My best friend Megan is the only other woman I know that has hunted. She fishes with me a lot. And we camp and hike. But it is difficult to find women that have been inclined to the outdoors even. I know they are there, but I just don't know too many. Not even the chicks that golf with me. So I think that you men are a key in this, bringing wives and girlfriends and daughters into it. As I have said, I didn't have someone to show me, and I wish I had, that would have been awesome. So guys, start recruitment. :-)
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven

MsDachshund
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:37 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby MsDachshund » Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:28 pm

Sierra wrote:I think so too, Woods. At least I hope so, that more women will hunt. I admit that this original post turned me off my its content, as being a little rude in a way to other women hunters, but I decided to ignore that. I still wonder if it's genuine or not. But that's neither here nor there.

My best friend Megan is the only other woman I know that has hunted. She fishes with me a lot. And we camp and hike. But it is difficult to find women that have been inclined to the outdoors even. I know they are there, but I just don't know too many. Not even the chicks that golf with me. So I think that you men are a key in this, bringing wives and girlfriends and daughters into it. As I have said, I didn't have someone to show me, and I wish I had, that would have been awesome. So guys, start recruitment. :-)


Well I see your point and I do appolojize if I seemed rude. You would have to know my history to understand where that comment came from. Here is some more about me. I have been camping, real camping, not RV camping since I was 12 years old. I love it. I also have been fishing as child all my life. I love the out doors, even though I am very fair skinned and shy from the sun, I found ways to be outside and not burn like an egg in a fry pan. I have done my own butchering on many animals including deer. The thing that weirded me out but not stop me was the fact that they were still warm. Just this past spring, I did my own chickens from peeps to bring to size, butchering and cleaning and processing them. They are nestled nicely in my freezor, all 25. I have caught my own fish and cleaned them myself. I still use a spoon just out of habit! LOL. So now you know another lady. What makes this so funny is I work as a designer but I am hands on and do my own installations. Which means I am doing what men normally do. I am a member of National Association of Women in Construction and deal with men in construction on a regular basis. I'm either treated as if the estrogen renders me incapable of running a drill or measuring. Most men assume that or they assume I must be lesbian. Now, please don't take that as an insult to lesbian, I am very for people being what ever they want to be and they're choices are none of the publics opinions. Another subject I am touchy about as I have very close friends and relatives who's prefernce is gay. I am a very open minded woman. Maybe this helps in understanding where my comment came from. I am truly serious about doing this. It's just like everything else in my life, if I want it, I had to go out and figure out how to come by it on my own. I guess that's why I own my own company for the past 20 years. So what do you think now? Please let me know your thoughts as I am very serious about wanting to learn how to do this. We might get in on the hunting season for deer this year and that's ok, we want to do this the right way and be safe and legal. I can't wait to post our first picture when we do finally get to hunt. Might be fish before too long, LOL! Remind me some time tell you the story about me taking on a live coyote that was comming after my animals! Oh, I do have a photo of when I went bogging and won the competetion!!! I'll post that.

xmatax
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 6:30 am
Location: NW PA

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby xmatax » Fri Nov 30, 2012 7:45 pm

Just my 2 cents on rifles...

Start off test firing with a smaller caliber say a .22 a .223 or a .243 and fire it to get used to noise, recoil, etc. See how it feels...reason being when I started hunting at 12 I developed a flinch when I fired a high powered rifle because I was shooting a 30-06, the recoil was a bit much for me at the time because I weighed all of 100 lbs wet! It took me probably 4 - 5 years to get out of that nasty habit and I eventually settled on a .270. I have fired a .243, 30-30, a .270, a 30-06, a 300 mag, and a .308. Each one does the exact same thing (kills a deer), but subtle differences with each gun can make a difference in your shot.

I haven't really any experience with slug guns, but I'd start with like a 20 guage and work my way down to a 12 guage, again for the same reasons above.

After you have test fired some guns and you've chose your rifle, become comfortable with it by shooting, cleaning, and becoming familiar with the gun's safety, scope, etc. They say treat every gun as if it's loaded...I treat a gun as if it's loaded and a child! You can never be too safe.

As far as getting started...

1. Education, Reading, and Conversing
2. Purchasing Equipment
3. Set Expectations
4. Start getting into the woods
5. Harvest your first deer
6. Advanced stuff...

Everyone has expectations of what they want to get out of hunting. First and foremost I would say the most important part of hunting is just the passion and love of nature and being in the woods. Without that it would be mundane and boring (though text messaging and smart phones have helped with that!)

1. Education, Reading, and Conversing:

As others have stated, go to a hunter's safety course and/or seminars (a lot of gun shows have informational presentations put on by people who are passionate about hunting). Try to read as much as you can to gain a general understanding of what life in the woods is like and what to expect. Like others have stated, tree stand hunting vs. ladder stands vs. ground blinds vs. sitting under a tree vs. walking and stalking! Gauge the experiences of others and what you've read to set your own goals for yourself in an upcoming season. (Take the "trophy shows" with a grain of salt because they are best case scenario and instead talk to other hunters in your area to figure out your realistic expectations from deer sightings to herd size and the works). From there only you can only take it to the next level via practical experience and conversing with others...like on this forum!

2. Purchasing Equipment

Unless you have a TON of money to throw around (couple grand), I wouldn't go out and purchase top of the line hunting gear. See if you can find a local store that sells gently used hunting clothing or an outlet store because it can get VERY costly. If you've never been hunting you don't really know where you'll be 2 years or 5 years down the road and may find you don't enjoy it as much as you thought you would (though I hope you do!).

3. Setting Expectations

From the knowledge you gained via books, conversation, seminars, etc. You will begin to take into consideration how you'd like to hunt and set expectations. This doesn't necessarily mean shoot a deer on by the 3rd day in the woods because that's a whole other learning experience in itself. What I mean is...seeing a deer...how you'll react and how you think you'll respond, move, prepare for it coming into shooting range...How you are planning on hunting ground vs. tree vs. blind vs. walking. If you choose to go up in the air, again, try to find someone who may have a stand and get up into it a time or two and see how you feel sitting on a piece of metal attached to a pole. I love hang-on stands but now I almost prefer a ladder stand or ground blind. I just don't like climbing trees and am a bit skiddish of heights! Remember, just because you picked one doesn't mean you have to settle on it! Try all types of hunting and you'll figure out what appeals to you the most.

4. Getting in the woods

You said you have land to hunt already...after the season is over for whitetail in your area (get the information online or in your hunting book) go into the woods and explore for signs of deer whether it's droppings, rubs, scrapes, trails, antler sheds, etc. If you can get a topographical map or use google earth to assist you with the exact layout you can find starting points as to where to search for deer accessing your land. You will have ideas of where to walk/search based on the information you'll gain from basic hunting books and knowledge you obtain from others via questions. You can also post pictures on here or drawings if you're artistic and ask for suggestions of where to look on your given lot. There are so many knowledgeable people in this forum. Hunting is a 365 day a year sport so just because it isn't hunting season doesn't mean you shouldn't be scouting the woods, fields, and taking walks looking for antlers. The more information you get, the greater chance at success you will have.

5. Harvest your first deer

OK, this is a LOT harder than just walking into the woods, grunting, and a deer running into your stand, boom it's dead. This will probably be the most frustrating part when you get to the actual season. However the adrenaline rush when you see your first deer in stand, see your first buck, spook a deer that is within 15 yards, the thrill of a shot on target is what every hunter lives for! Patience and persistence will get you that first deer and when you reflect on what you did to get there is the icing on the cake.

6. Advanced tactics...

This is what the forum is for...after you have a grasp on the basics of hunting whitetail (it's not just sit in a field or tree and wait) you can begin to explore ways to improve your chances of harvesting deer, improving habitat, using scouting cameras, etc.

I hope, while long, this helps you in the direction you want to go...into the woods!

User avatar
Ifishandhunt
 
Posts: 279
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 6:39 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby Ifishandhunt » Fri Nov 30, 2012 8:50 pm

Welcome! I think it is great you and your daughter are starting to look into hunting. I wish my wife and daughter were interested, it would give us more to do together and one more thing to make memories with. Well at least they help me process the deer. That is good bonding time too. They actually told me in the past couple weeks that they want to go shooting at the range... they want to learn how to shoot the handguns for personal defense. Good stuff!

I think xmatax has some good suggestions. As far as the rifles and shotguns, practice makes perfect. Get to the gun range (or your property) and practice shooting. If you are able to borrow different caliber guns from friends to get a feel for what fits you best that is great. When it comes to shotguns with slug barrels, the 20 gauges seem to have less recoil than the 12 gauges. I use a Remington 870 12 gauge with a rifled barrel. It's a great slug gun. The problem with a rifled barrel is that the ammo can get expensive. IMO each shotgun likes a certain ammo. I tried cheaper slugs and I could never get a good grouping. My shotgun has expensive taste... I end up having to use the expensive copper slugs because they shoot the best. Well actually I used to use Remington Buckhammer slugs but they are discontinued so the Remington Core Lokt Sabot slugs are the best alternative for my gun. As far as rifles, I own a Savage Model 11 .308. Freakin awesome gun but unfortunately we cannot use a rifle in Ohio. Still fun to shoot and one day I will get to Indiana or Kentucky to hunt if someone invites me (Shaman??? ;) ). I hear the 30-06 packs a mean recoil and some say it is more gun than you need to kill a deer, but great for elk. I think the .243 are popular rifles for deer hunting.

As far as clothing... some on this site swear by certain types of camo brands, some don't even use camo, and some use gillie suits. Bottom line is you want something that will 'break up' your human silhouette. There are some great forums on this site that discuss this type of topic. It is very useful. Personally I use Predator Camo... good breakup designs. ASAT is good to. I used to use Mossy Oak breakup brand and sometimes still do but I am amazed at how deer seem to look right through me when I wear Predator camo.

Scent elimination (or reduction--- you can never be 100% scent free) is crucial too. Deer have a great sense of smell.

One more thing that is probably one of the most important tools I use out in the field... a good range finder so you can know the distance you are shooting. If you are like me, I have a very difficult time judging range by the naked eye. I rely on my range finder and always carry extra batteries. I use a bow (as well as shotgun) and the range finder makes the difference between a clean shot or a miss. It is great to pre-range trees and things when you first get in your tree stand (or where ever you park yourself) so you are ready for when a deer passes something your ranged.

You are also ahead of the game having your own property to scout, work the land and pick your spots. That is half the fun!

Good hunting!

MsDachshund
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:37 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby MsDachshund » Sun Dec 02, 2012 9:06 am

You have given us so much to take in. A studying we will go!

User avatar
JPH
 
Posts: 3416
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:28 am

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby JPH » Sun Dec 02, 2012 12:22 pm

MsDachshund wrote: No one takes us seriously because, get this, "we are too attractive to hunt".


Happens to me all the time. You get used to it.

User avatar
kellory
 
Posts: 2696
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 3:01 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby kellory » Sun Dec 02, 2012 12:52 pm

JPH wrote:
MsDachshund wrote: No one takes us seriously because, get this, "we are too attractive to hunt".


Happens to me all the time. You get used to it.

LOL!
download.gif
download.gif (1010 Bytes) Viewed 2103 times
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

User avatar
Jslotter
 
Posts: 792
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 8:01 am
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Brand New Hunter

Postby Jslotter » Sun Dec 02, 2012 3:55 pm

JPH wrote:
MsDachshund wrote: No one takes us seriously because, get this, "we are too attractive to hunt".


Happens to me all the time. You get used to it.

Image
I only hunt on days that end in ' Y '.

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests