Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

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kellory
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby kellory » Sat Dec 29, 2012 11:58 pm

Welcome wishing, a good first post! Stick around, and spread some knowledge.... ;)
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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Sierra
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Sierra » Sun Dec 30, 2012 11:00 am

Hi wishing, welcome to the forum. Good post to jump in with, and I am in agreement. My perspective comes from a lot of years as single mom (before I stumbled upon my current fiance 7 years ago and he wanted the job, he's a wonderful guy!). That said, working always had to come first of course, for survival, but sacrifices need to be made to raise kids correctly. I see plenty of parents in two-parent households that don't spend the time they should. I will never forget all those days when I was so tired coming home from work, but parent time never has off-duty hours. The best thing we did was just spend time together and have fun. A great deal of that time was spent camping and fishing. Economical activities that provide a great amount of togetherness and interaction and memories, plus teaches valuable skills. With my daughter about to turn 18 in a couple of days, I am not looking back thinking I did a perfect job of course, but I am glad I never allowed technology on our camping trips, limit computer access at home and demand the majority of our meals at home be eaten together. When outdoors it's hard to get me to rush or hurry to do the next thing, and I never go on a trip with the kids with an agenda that packs every day with some form of entertainment. I see this with my brother's kids and they are always running, and the kids have the attention spans of ferrets. As it is, my kids don't have the patience like I had when I was little, but I believe that one day when they have their own kids, they will have the respect for others and the outdoors I have tried to show them. And not feel entitled to every little thing. And not feel like others should put in the effort they should. That relates to everything in life.

So I digress, but I agree. Manners are not taught to kids the same way anymore, and people don't have a respect for personal space and property. A great many people in my generation are like that. And it's a shame. But on the plus side, there are great people that pass down good ethics related to all things, and not just hunting. Specific to hunting however, it's great that people can be found, such as on here, willing to help new people get started and learn the unwritten code of conduct.
And then the moon, like to a silver bow new bent in Heaven

Chucky
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Chucky » Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:18 pm

I have a similar problem. I hunt public land and the rules are first come first serve, don't cut anything! And carry out what ever you carry in everyday. I understand these rules and try to live by them (I do leave a camera sometimes to scout deer and to see if I'm not alone in the area.)
I have done fine the last two years this way. But this year I have an individual who showed up the middle of November and has done everything he can to ruin this spot. He has started cutting down trees(in a state forest big no no), leaving trash (water bottles candy wrappers and cigarette butts) and he just recently destroyed my trail camera. Oddly enough I am less angry about the trail cam than the garbage.
Normally I have pictures of deer every day but since this yahoo showed up I've seen nothing even at night.
So I'm hoping this guy doesn't bow hunt to so maybe I can finish out the season in peace. But I don't k ow what to do for next year!
Any suggestions?

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kellory
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby kellory » Tue Jan 01, 2013 3:07 pm

Welcome to the forum, Chucky. Sounds like a first class A-hole; you're dealing with. Sorry to hear it. You didn't happen to mention how your camera was destroyed. Blunt force trauma, or did he shoot it? Reason I ask, is you could hang the cameras higher in the trees, pointed down to cover your trails, while being out of reach of anything but a bullet, or a ladder. Or hang it with a climbing stand, and brush it in, so it goes un-noticed.
More than one camera could catch the vandalism in crossfire, and the Game-warden, or a sheriff, might be able to do something. You might even leave a broken camera at ground level (bait) with a camera hidden to catch his face, back tag, truck, weapon, ect. If he is that poorly informed as to the laws, he may be using the wrong type of weapon (for the law enforcement officer). I happen to carry a small trash bag in my pack, and often carry out more than I carried in. Good luck, and let us know how it goes. ;)
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

Chucky
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Chucky » Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:31 pm

First he used the lens photo cells and motion sensors as an ashtray ,cut the lock tabs and spring tabs off, shattered the view screen and then to add insult to injury he took the SD card when he was done he left it open to the rain we had during the next few days.
Next year I'll hang them higher I just hate having to take my climber to check cameras.

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kellory
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby kellory » Tue Jan 01, 2013 7:09 pm

A light weight aluminum extension ladder, should make that job much easier.... ;)
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

Chucky
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 9:53 am

Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Chucky » Wed Jan 02, 2013 12:48 pm

I'm looking for an inexpensive telescoping ladder so that its a little easier to carry

Yukon
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Yukon » Thu Oct 24, 2013 7:02 pm

Hi guys new to the forum and wanted to know what your thoughts are.
How about a land trust that allows 20 people hunt it "that I never see" but there are 3 stands inline 50 yds apart. All facing
A corn field where all the activity is and 2 behind them.
Seems like its one guy trying to lock up the area.
What would you do? Thank you for your responses

mhouck06
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby mhouck06 » Fri Oct 25, 2013 10:18 am

If you cant talk to the person/people to work something out, I'd move on, find another spot.

Chucky
 
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Re: Treestand etiquette - when it's not yours

Postby Chucky » Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:38 am

Good question.
But my question to you is how big is the trust in acres,what is the topography, and what are the rules?
I hunted a place where a hung stand was a public stand meaning anyone in the club could use it.
And I have had places where the hunting looked like it would be good but because of other hunters the deer were pressured to move through another spot. For instance I once hunted a park that is full of deer and it's bow hunt only. Every funnel, rub line, or trail crossing had half a dozen trees scared up from climbers or a hang on up in a tree. So I would move to the next spot that deer were using only to find the same thing. One day while talking to a fellow bow hunter he told me " if you wanna hunt that park you gotta go deep In the thickets ( rose thicket). If your not bleeding going in and out your not deep enough. " he was right. My shots were short and narrow but I saw deer. I never took one out of that park but it wasn't because of opportunity I was looking for something special.
Hope this helps

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