Beginning Hunting

What's the hunt looking like this year in your area? Share!
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rthomas4
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:07 pm
Location: Hampton, SC

Re: Beginning Hunting

Postby rthomas4 » Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:58 am

Since I use a rifle when sitting in a tree stand, and a shotgun when hunting with dogs in the swamp, maybe I can provide a little bit more of my opinion. Down here we hunt deer with buckshot, not slugs(if I hunt on the Federal WMA, then slugs are mandatory). The reason is the thick cover we're shooting in, the deer are usually running, the nearness of other hunters, and the required speed and repeat shots often needed. Most of us simply choose a shotgun with interchangeable choke tubes, rather than separate barrels, and it's very important to determine the shot pattern of not only the choke tube, but the different brands of shotgun shells used. The Remington 870 and all of it's variants is a good choice along with the Mossberg 500, if you can work the pump action and keep the barrel on target. I own a few pump guns, but actually prefer a semi-auto for deer hunting; and since I'm usually using a shotgun in the swamps, I prefer synthetic stocks. Because a synthetic stock is more inclined to have a little stronger recoil, I outfit my guns with Sim's, or Tru-Glo recoil pads, and also have slings on all of them which makes it easier to wade through the water, as well as, getting the deer back out after I kill 'em. You can usually pick up a real nice Remington 1100, Stoeger, or Winchester semi-auto or pump at a pawn shop for a fraction of what you'd pay at a regular gun shop or even Walmart. Browning, Benelli, and Beretta will usually set you back considerably more. Also, for deer hunting, I recommend that you go with a .12 gauge, simply for the distance and the knockdown power; plus the ammo selections are better, and the .12 will work fine for turkeys, doves, and ducks along with most other small game(again choke tubes help when the game changes). I might also mention that when deer hunting, there isn't much discernible difference between 2 3/4"or 3", but a gun that provides the option of the two and even 3 1/2" might be a good investment if you plan to do a variety of different types of hunting. I've killed running deer at nearly 100 yards with my Mossberg 935, using the 3 1/2" 00 buckshot, but missed at 10 feet with the same load.
I guess my point, is don't get yourself locked in to one particular brand or action, and if possible, try several different pumps and semi-autos, to see which one suits you the best. Then happy hunting!!!!
NRA LM, NAHC LM, Buckmasters LM, The Second Amendment Foundation, GOA, NAGR, Palmetto Gun Rights, QDMA, DU, NWTF, ASAdisabled sportsmens' alliance, EDH, and Proud SC redneck REBEL for life.

benjames1285
 
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Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 11:55 am

Re: Beginning Hunting

Postby benjames1285 » Sat Mar 09, 2013 10:47 am

Awesome! Thank you guys for all the information! I really appreciate it. Well what I think I am going to do since Wisconsin DOES allow shotguns for deer hunting is get a Remmington 870 to start out with in a month or two. I also want to shoot trap so that works out very well. I'll be posting more questions soon on this thread. Again thank you!

terriejohnston
 
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Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2012 4:30 pm

Re: Beginning Hunting

Postby terriejohnston » Sun Mar 24, 2013 9:40 am

I think he should start by taking hunters safety if you don't have a clue about shooting a gun and it is mandatory in the state of Wisconsin before you can even put in for any tags. So that is just my 2 cents worth seems like everyone forgets to teach people the right way to start off to hunt.

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kellory
 
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 3:01 pm
Location: Ohio

Re: Beginning Hunting

Postby kellory » Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:42 pm

terriejohnston wrote:I think he should start by taking hunters safety if you don't have a clue about shooting a gun and it is mandatory in the state of Wisconsin before you can even put in for any tags. So that is just my 2 cents worth seems like everyone forgets to teach people the right way to start off to hunt.


That is a given legal step, but not the first proper step. That is the State, doing what the parent has not done, teach. He could be taught by an experienced hunter, for a full deer season on an "Apprentice Licence"here in Ohio. I assume there are similar programs there. BEFORE he takes the safety course. Each hunter, (here) can Apprentice 3 new hunters in his lifetime. I have done do once already.
The first step, is not the safety course, but it is the minimum standard for the State.

The best thing you can do for a new hunter, is share your hunt with them, and teach as you go. Make sure to follow the laws of your state, but teach them, as they were taught in years past...as I was taught. With hands on experience, and boots on the ground. Teach them how to see the world as the game does, and in doing, it teaches them about themselves as well.

These young hunters are the future of our sport, so don't leave it to the minimum standard of the state, teach them. :mrgreen:
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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