Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

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Everyday Hunter
 
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Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby Everyday Hunter » Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:24 pm

Has anybody ever heard of Dr. Ken Nordberg and his Whitetail Hunting Almanacs?

Anyone read any of them?
What do you know about them? About him?

Steve.
When the Everyday Hunter isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.
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Bowriter
 
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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby Bowriter » Sun Mar 24, 2013 7:38 am

Sure, heard of him, know him. What do you want to know?

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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby Everyday Hunter » Sun Mar 24, 2013 10:16 am

Bowriter wrote:Sure, heard of him, know him. What do you want to know?

Nothing really specific. Just wondering...
... if he's still around;
... if he's still writing;
... if anyone here has read his books;
... why he's not better known;
... what you think of them;

I have all 9 volumes of his Whitetail Almanac. (#6 is almost impossible to find.) I read a borrowed copy of one of them many years ago, and now that I have all 9 I might start through them soon -- as soon as I catch up on some of my other reading (whenever that might be).

Steve.
When the Everyday Hunter isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.
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shaman
 
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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby shaman » Wed Mar 27, 2013 2:35 pm

Steve:

I'm posting this here, but I'll also cross-post this on your 24hourcampfire thread.

http://www.drnordbergondeerhunting.com/ ... Tip_2.html

Here is a tip from Nordberg. It is typical of what I understand his hunting style to be. In some ways I agree with his basic premise. In some ways I do not.

Nordberg hunts deep woods. I hunt 200 acres of abandoned farm in KY. Hunter density is intense where I am-- 3 shot strings per minute on a good Opener. We get our share of big bucks on our place. His method would work on our place, but that it would create a better success rate I doubt. When I was new to the property 12 seasons ago, I used tactics very similar to what he is suggesting. However, within a couple of seasons, I had the place figured out, and started putting up permanent blinds and stands. I tried to rotate my use of them, trying to use one stand per half-day per weekend in order to keep the deer from figuring out where I would be. However, after I got myself unemployed, I had all season to hunt. The question was: How often could I hunt the same stand and not be "made."

I was off work for 3 straight rifle seasons, and hunted as much as I could. What I found was that rotating stands did not do a whole lot. I went from rotating a stand once per week to once every 3 days to. . . well, I've pretty much given up on a few stand locations, and I am concentrating on the most successful. I could probably hunt the same stand every day all season and not screw things up. Indeed, I have picked up my #2 and #3 all-time bucks from a blind that I'd pretty well camped-out in for the whole season. After that, I let SuperCore take a session at the same shooting house, and he scored the farms #2 all-time buck out of it.

It depends. If you're sitting on a Nordberg style portable stump, with minimal cover, down at buck's level, I can believe you are going to be made, patterned, busted, whatever. On the other hand, if you have a good permanent blind or stand that is strategically placed, you may have the same deer show up day after day, season after season. I would suggest that this tactic might actually be better than hopping about and stinking up a whole bunch of places. I don't know, I'm just saying. If you read my weblog at all, you know all my tricks for keeping things clean and keeping the deer happy.

Most of us do not have thousands of acres of trackless northern wood to hunt. I'm limited to 200 acres. Yes, when I didn't know the place, I did a lot of hunts sitting on a 5 gallon bucket, basically my answer to the portable stump. However, that was all part of the overall effort to learn the place-- kind of a scout/hunt combination. Later on, as I started to zero in on places that deserved special attention, I switched to portable stands. Before I put up a 2-man buddy ladder stand in a location, I might throw a ladder stick and a Loc-On on a tree and figure out if this was really where I wanted to hunt. Some worked. Some didn't.

My advice is to use what Nordberg is saying as a good way to find the kind of spots that can be better exploited using permanent stands or blinds. Once you have something like a nice permanent ladder stand up, you can get in and out without doing much to disturb the deer.

Disturb bucks? Look, the bucks I see are usually so besotted with testosterone that they do not know which end is up. I've been challenged by a buck while I was out walking. Lord only knows what he intended to do to me, and I thank Him that I did not have to find out. Bucks generally don't know or care about me. Furthermore, the buck I see today is most likely going to be in another part of the county by tomorrow. Bucks roam. They roam a lot. No, what you, the great hunter, needs to worry about is your doe. They are the bait. You keep your doe happy and contented, they will keep coming by your stand and then one day they will have one of those big bucks latch on and follow them past. THAT's what it's all about. When I have my resident doe herd drop by my blind and the matriarch sticks her head in to say hello, and then wanders off flicking her tail, I know I am on the right track.

I should probably giving lectures and have Angus and KYHillChick out front start selling DVD's. I might even get rid of the cover scent chewing gum and the anti-telepathy hats that way. What do y'all think?
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
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Bowriter
 
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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby Bowriter » Fri Mar 29, 2013 6:02 pm

Dam if I have the slightest idea if you are asking a question or writing a letter. :D

I presented lectures at outdoor shows around the country for 25-years. I tried to sculpt the lecture to the general area around where I was speaking.

What that means is: The tactics that work well in Canada boreal forest are useless in farm country midwest. You have to hunt the deer the way the food source and general habitat dictates. All deer movement is determined by four factors. Food-cover-terrain-structure. Everything a deer does is ruled by one or more of those factors. A deer moves from point A to point B. If they don't move, we can't kill them. It is that simple.

Food is the catalyst, it is what makes them move. No food source, no deer. How they move to that food source is determined by cover-terrain-structure. Like water, given sufficient cover, they take the path of least resistance(terrain). Cover and terrain determines how and where they will travel. Structure alters that movement, (fences, roads, houses etc.)

That is all you need to know. Just plug it into your situation. How many times can you hunt from the same place? Varies from day to day. I have onje treestrand from which, in 14-years, I have killed 42-deer. If a deer has never been by that stand, how will he know it is there? Go to a stand and leave it from different trails and times and odds are, you can hunt the heck out of it.

Deer are not very smart. However, in terms of mortality, once a deer reaches 3.5-years, 93% of them die of something besides a hunter. Same is true of a doe if she is hunted as hard as a buck. In your situation, if there is high pressure around you, you may get an influx of deer if you present low pressure. Also, bow hunting is not nearly as stressfull to a deer as gun hunting. But, strangely enough, it is not the sound of the gun that bothers them, it is the movement of the hunters. So, if you carefuly bowhunt your property, you should be able to do about what you want. Depending on just where in KY you are, I might be convinced to come show you how to bowhunt your land. ;)

One last tip. Never believe more than 20% of anything written by an expert, especially one with a degree in wildlife biology.

By the way, I have a degree in wildlife biology. :lol:

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shaman
 
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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby shaman » Sat Mar 30, 2013 2:49 pm

Bowriter wrote:Dam if I have the slightest idea if you are asking a question or writing a letter. :D

:lol:


Yep, that's what those degrees in wildlife biology usually buy you :D

Bottom line: I'm not convinced that rotating stands is worth it. I experimented a few years ago, and the results suggested that finding a hot stand and sticking with it was the better way to go. You seem to agree; Nordberg is full of beans.

As to teaching me how to bow hunt? Thanks, but sorry. My shoulder gave out 6 years ago, and I'm down to just using the rifle now. That's okay though. I had 25 good years out of the shoulder.
Genesis 9:2-4 Ministries of SW Bracken County, KY
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Re: Ever hear of Dr. Ken Nordberg?

Postby Bowriter » Wed Apr 24, 2013 4:48 pm

Finaly got back to this site- I had over 30-years of bowhunting before my shoulder went south. For thelastfew years, I have been shooting a crossbow. Hate it but at least I am still bowhunting.


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