Trailing Mysteries

Describe the most puzzling blood trail you've ever been on.
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Capn Hook
 
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Trailing Mysteries

Postby Capn Hook » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:13 am

I took Charlie, my 6 year old with me Sunday evening. We sat in a pop up blind that I keep set up for the season in a wooded bottleneck between a utility right of way and a grown up cutover. This is where I had gotten most of the photos of the big bucks on the trail cam, so I was hoping we would see something. About 4, I saw a four pointer come out of the cutover about 30 yards away and got my bow ready. Charlie peeked out of the window and slapped both hands over his mouth to keep from laughing with excitement. I ignored my instincts to let him walk into a clearer lane through the next window and released the arrow with some light brush between me and the target. The deer took off into to woods and Charlie said he thought he heard him fall. When we started tracking him, we noticed that instead of blood, we were seeing a white substance that looked like baby spitup. I knew it was from the deer because one large spot had hair in it, but there wasn’t the lightest trace of red. We followed it easily into the woods for a good 100 yards before deciding that my shot was off, and it couldn’t be a good enough shot to kill the deer. I retraced the shot and found the arrow stuck in the ground far behind where the deer stood, which was slightly downhill. It was clean, so I knew the deer would probably survive. I didn’t explain it to Charlie, but I think there is a chance I may have nearly castrated that deer. That’s the only explanation I can think of.
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Ohio farms
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Ohio farms » Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:16 am

Not sure about the lack of a blood trail that you described, but arrows tend not to fly well through any type of brush. It might stay on target if the brush (light) is close to the deer, but I would avoid that shot. Missing is rarely any fun.
Charlie looks like he is ready to go.
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

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Retranger
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Retranger » Thu Nov 28, 2013 7:16 am

recheck the area the deer went and do an extensive search. More PATIENCE'S required ;) ;)
Doug

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kellory
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby kellory » Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:55 am

What do you figure that deer weighed? 150-180lbs? He was standing on the ground just like you, and making tracks just like you were. Don't just follow the blood trail, but TRACK him. You may not always have a blood trail from a high chest hit with no pass through, or a broken arrow, or a fragmented bullet. Not all shots will give you a dotted line to follow. Look where he walked, what he touched, (transfer) pushed grasses where he went through. Leaves turned over by him dragging his toes.
You know where to find his tracks, he was standing in them when you shot, so look for them and try your eye. Use more than just one method, and look for the traces he made by just being there.
Find those tracks. Confirm with hair. Blood, scat, whatever you find, and follow the WHOLE trail that deer left behind.
If you lose the trace, mark the last trace easy to see at head highth and circle it, he may have. Changed directions. You may even use a climber stand to climb a tree to look from the air.
Wounded deer generally either head for water, run full out, or hide close, so keep your weapons ready if you kick him up from some high grass that wouldn't hide a rabbit, and track quietly, so you can hear if he starts to move.
In my opinion, once you fire and that shot, it is your responsibility to find and finish that kill, before you continue hunting.
Not to be harsh, but you deer will likely die of gangrene or infection instead of a full recovery.

Find him, and finish the job.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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Retranger
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Retranger » Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:46 am

Capn Hook wrote: I retraced the shot and found the arrow stuck in the ground far behind where the deer stood, which was slightly downhill. It was clean,


Clean arrow doesn't sound good. Kind a indicates a miss. I still would go back and track that deer like Killroy said.
Doug

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Ohio farms
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Ohio farms » Mon Dec 23, 2013 9:37 am

Not sure why people come to the forum, post a question, then never return to engage those that took the time to respond. :?:
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

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Capn Hook
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Capn Hook » Thu Jan 02, 2014 5:38 pm

Ohio farms wrote:Not sure about the lack of a blood trail that you described, but arrows tend not to fly well through any type of brush. It might stay on target if the brush (light) is close to the deer, but I would avoid that shot. Missing is rarely any fun.
Charlie looks like he is ready to go.



Thanks for the reply. I typically would avoid any shot that wasn't a clear and properly angled path, but having my son there caused me to forego my better judgement. I've hunted and read enough to know better. My reason for the post was not to be patronized on my technique and sportsmanship, but rather hopefully receive some insight about the strange trail. Although I regret the shot and the pain and suffering that it may have inflicted, I have no doubt that the deer will be just fine, as I have taken deer that have recovered from injuries far worse. Check out another one of my posts about the buck with the broken tine embedded in his skull.

Any replies about the 'white goo' trail are welcome.

Regards.
-Cap'n

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kellory
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby kellory » Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:19 pm

Capt, I have reread every response, and found not one patronizing word. No one was given you any kind of hard time. If you are that thin skinned, you don't belong on a forum. Grow up.
I can track a deer, where most people can't tell there is a trail. I happen to pretty good at it, and I gave you my best advice. Track it, using it's WHOLE trail, not just fluids. (as to your white trace, I can think of only three white traces. sperm,pus, and lung foam. any one of those, he ain't going to recover.) So get over this idea he will be just fine. Some deer DO recover from cars, and bullets, arrows, and fights. but infection will kill a deer, just as dead as it will kill you, or me. He will likely die a long hard death by inches.
No one questioned your sportsmanship, But I know what I do when a deer is hit. I do, and have stopped hunting, and tracked that deer, until I either found it, killed it, or could not follow where it went. I even changed from a bow to a crossbow for a harder hit, and a clean pass through, due to a bad bow shot, and a 5 hour tracking job. I lost that one on land where the owner would not allow me to continue tracking on his land. he was a non-hunter.
In my eyes, once that shot is let fly, I am committed to finish what I started. My comfort, and my convenience, don't matter. only my commitment to finish the kill, I owe that deer as clean a death, as I am capable of delivering. I work to fill the freezer, and care very little about the rack, it is just a postcard of the journey. but I will let a shot go, if it is a bad shot. I don't rely on deer to eat tonight, so there will be a better shot later.
You screwed up. admit it, deal with it, and try not to let it happen again. That is all you can do. That, and learn to track, as if your next meal depended upon finding what you shot.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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Capn Hook
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby Capn Hook » Fri Jan 03, 2014 11:09 am

kellory wrote:Capt, I have reread every response, and found not one patronizing word. No one was given you any kind of hard time. If you are that thin skinned, you don't belong on a forum. Grow up.
I can track a deer, where most people can't tell there is a trail. I happen to pretty good at it, and I gave you my best advice. Track it, using it's WHOLE trail, not just fluids. (as to your white trace, I can think of only three white traces. sperm,pus, and lung foam. any one of those, he ain't going to recover.) So get over this idea he will be just fine. Some deer DO recover from cars, and bullets, arrows, and fights. but infection will kill a deer, just as dead as it will kill you, or me. He will likely die a long hard death by inches.
No one questioned your sportsmanship, But I know what I do when a deer is hit. I do, and have stopped hunting, and tracked that deer, until I either found it, killed it, or could not follow where it went. I even changed from a bow to a crossbow for a harder hit, and a clean pass through, due to a bad bow shot, and a 5 hour tracking job. I lost that one on land where the owner would not allow me to continue tracking on his land. he was a non-hunter.
In my eyes, once that shot is let fly, I am committed to finish what I started. My comfort, and my convenience, don't matter. only my commitment to finish the kill, I owe that deer as clean a death, as I am capable of delivering. I work to fill the freezer, and care very little about the rack, it is just a postcard of the journey. but I will let a shot go, if it is a bad shot. I don't rely on deer to eat tonight, so there will be a better shot later.
You screwed up. admit it, deal with it, and try not to let it happen again. That is all you can do. That, and learn to track, as if your next meal depended upon finding what you shot.


Thanks for the good advice. Why do you think that a deer wouldn't recover from a nicked testicle?

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kellory
 
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Re: Trailing Mysteries

Postby kellory » Fri Jan 03, 2014 11:39 am

Infection. There are few places that would infect faster.
The only real difference between a good tracker and a bad tracker is observation. All the same data is present for both. The rest is understanding what you are seeing.

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