Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Tips on how to keep yourself in top form for the hunting season.
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Sailfish
 
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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby Sailfish » Fri Mar 05, 2010 5:00 am

Not so sure its shin splints (it still may be though, just offering another view).

Sounds to me like she hit muscles she didn't know she had by the new and various types of exercises performed.

The treatment methods presented here however are spot on for muscle soreness and prevention.

It may have been mentioned but to reiterate on pre-training stretching.
DO NOT do serious stretching while your muscles are 'cold'.
Your muscles need some sort of increased blood flow before you stretch. Perhaps a slightly brisk walk from the back of the Y parking lot to the gym.

Second pre-stretching should never ever ever hurt nor should you actually feel the muscle stretching/tightness. Stretching needs to be done in increments.
On your stretch, bring the body  part just before the point you start to feel the muscle stretch, then hold it there (you may even need to back off just a tad). 15-20 sec is suffice. Then do the other side. etc.
When you switch back to the other side you will find your range of motion (or stretch) has increased with each "set"

Of course a brief interlude between each stretch is good,  and never ever do bouncy, yanky, jerky things with your body parts while stretching.

Good luck



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"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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JPH
 
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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby JPH » Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:03 am

Re. stretching, looks like it is yet another meeting of the minds and a respectful difference of opinion. http://forum.deeranddeerhunting.com/tm.aspx?m=27059

I am not a proponent of static stretching, before or after exercise. Dynamic stretching (aka warming-up)? Yes. Stretching and holding for the sake of stretching and holding? No.

We go to all this trouble to make our muscles more compact and powerful. Why would we turn around and work to make them longer and weaker? Execute movements to a full range of motion and vary exercises often and stretching is not only unnecessary but counterproductive.

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Sailfish
 
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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby Sailfish » Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:22 am

While I as well stretch rarely and mostly remained  injury free(over 30 years of weights), I don't believe it is counterproductive in the least.
Majority of people do stretch incorrectly hence the multitude of injuries claimed caused by it.

But the lengthening of the muscles is extremely important, in fact that is why when weight training you should always perform the exercise with a full range of motion, that is the goal, longer, thicker muscle bellies. Shortening the muscles is exactly what we don't want. That only increase our chance of injury.

I was set for carpal tunnel surgery due to the fact I shortened my forearm muscles, never stretched them while typing (I am a poor, hard, typer). I left my hands in an UP position for 7 years. The muscles shortened.
After 4 years of massage therapy and regular stretching I never had to undergo the knife and I am 98% pain free (pain pre treatment was 9 now when I do get it is, a 2)

But as you suggested the meeting of the minds. Kind of like the old Ford v. Chevy discussions [:D]
"Go as far as you can see; when you get there, you'll be able to see farther."

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JPH
 
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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby JPH » Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:26 am

ORIGINAL: Sailfish

While I as well stretch rarely and mostly remained  injury free(over 30 years of weights), I don't believe it is counterproductive in the least.
Majority of people do stretch incorrectly hence the multitude of injuries claimed caused by it.

But the lengthening of the muscles is extremely important, in fact that is why when weight training you should always perform the exercise with a full range of motion, that is the goal, longer, thicker muscle bellies. Shortening the muscles is exactly what we don't want. That only increase our chance of injury.

I was set for carpal tunnel surgery due to the fact I shortened my forearm muscles, never stretched them while typing (I am a poor, hard, typer). I left my hands in an UP position for 7 years. The muscles shortened.
After 4 years of massage therapy and regular stretching I never had to undergo the knife and I am 98% pain free (pain pre treatment was 9 now when I do get it is, a 2)

But as you suggested the meeting of the minds. Kind of like the old Ford v. Chevy discussions [:D]


Good exchange, and I agree that it is a Ford v. Chevy thing. But what the heck? I'm game!

Please understand that when I speak "against stretching" what I am really talking about the old image of an athlete holding a static stretch for an extended period. We agree on range of movement and the value of dynamic stretching. That's good!

On the issue of longer muscle being the goal. I still disagree, but please note that I did not say the goal should be to shorten muscle. I said the goal should be muscles that are compact (not the same thing). I suppose I should also acknowledge that goals are not one size fits all. I'm speaking about my goals. The athlete who desires muscle that is slow and elastic, ie. a long distance runner, may well benefit from static stretching. I have also read that some body builders, who strive for hypertrophy over actual power, use static stretching to tear muscle fibers and add microscopic scar tissue and therefor "mass". Again, not my goals but nothing wrong with them per-se.

So, are long muscles weaker? Well let me ask this. Will stretching a hunk of steel make it stronger or weaker? When is it more likely to break, when it is compact or when it has been stretched? Here's another way to look at it. Imagine yourself butchering a deer. Which backstrap would you rather cut into steaks if your knife was getting dull, one bunched up or one stretched tight across a cutting board?

I choose to force my muscles out to full range of motion and back as often as possible but I avoid placing my muscles into an elongated position under tension for any length of time. I find justification in my research and personal experience, but I recognize that a large segment of trainers and athletes take an opposite approach and are also successful.

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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby DoeEyed » Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:32 pm

Well, what a difference a good pair of shoes make! Muscles are a little tight but not sore at all! Adding some of the stretches mentioned before and after helped a ton as well.

I am a firm believer in stretching wether it be dynamic, ballistic, static. Helps keep my muscles loose and flexible. They all have their place depending on the type of exercise performed or sport played. 
 
I imagine gymnasts do alot of static stretching. 
All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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JPH
 
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RE: Started a new Class at the YMCA...

Postby JPH » Sat Mar 06, 2010 5:59 am

ORIGINAL: DoeEyed

Well, what a difference a good pair of shoes make! Muscles are a little tight but not sore at all! Adding some of the stretches mentioned before and after helped a ton as well.

I am a firm believer in stretching wether it be dynamic, ballistic, static. Helps keep my muscles loose and flexible. They all have their place depending on the type of exercise performed or sport played. 

I imagine gymnasts do alot of static stretching. 


Glad to hear the shoes are making a difference! One other suggestion would be to keep those shoes set aside only for exercise. They will hold up much longer.

As for the stretching. Please understand that if it is working, I think it is a great idea. I realize that my position on the subject of static stretching runs up against tradition. I simply suggest that the reader considers a move away from static stretching. Watch the video in the link above, do some additional reading and experiment with other types of stretches and see if your performance and ability to resist injury do not improve.

As for gymnasts and static stretching. You might be surprised. The site that hosted the video is strongly influenced by the gymnastics community. I do not doubt that a lot of gymnastic coaches still adhere to static stretching, but their numbers are shrinking as evidence mounts against it.

Either way, I'm glad you are enjoying your class and benefiting from it. I wish you continued success. 

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