Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Discuss articles and commentaries from our recent issues!
User avatar
buckhunter21
 
Posts: 2982
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 7:28 pm

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby buckhunter21 » Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:35 am

Minimum of 8 hours, and I'm with JPH, I won't track a suspected gut shot deer in the dark...Or even one that is suspected to be poorly shot somewhere else.  Always good to have one other person helping you track.  I think two is the about the right number.....A third person could help a little more but if you get any more than that it gets to be crowded.  One person marking the last blood while the next person searches for blood ahead.
QDM!

flaDAWG
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:47 am

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby flaDAWG » Sun Jul 25, 2010 5:20 am

8 was'nt enuff N my case...Gut shot a doe with bow last year,arrow was green frum end to other...wait'd bout 8 hours,shot her N early morn'n...went bac late that afternoon,found where she lay'd up...dont no if wife n i push'd her up,butt she came out of scrub oaks out N2 pasture...BIG pasture...lost her trax...JPH,same here...my WIFE is my tracker,her eye's R better than mine...she can spot the smallest lil blood drop...she made trail'n a couple deer much easier...
Hope U all R dew'n finer than frawg hair!...Bsafe!

borntotrack
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:41 am

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby borntotrack » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:54 am

In my just published book, Dead On!, I agree that waiting is a strong option when you have confirmed that the deer has been gut shot. However, the risks are great of loss to coyotes over night...in my area about 30%. The best solution is to use a trained, leashed tracking dog to find the deer. If the gut-shot deer has the power to move out of its bed, the dog can easily follow. Usually it is not difficult to walk it down.

Gut-shot deer do dehydrate and go to water where they die. This scenario does not apply to deer wounded in other ways.

John Jeanneney
www.deadonbook.com
www.born-to-track.com

Bob Olsen
 
Posts: 134
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:24 am

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby Bob Olsen » Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:58 pm

Would there be a difference between bow and gun? This is why I personally like a 20 yard shot. I read or heard that a gut-shot Deer will head toward the water.

User avatar
jonny5buck
 
Posts: 436
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2008 8:06 am
Location: Land of Lincoln

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby jonny5buck » Mon Feb 07, 2011 7:18 pm

I don't have too much to add.....i think this is one of the few or only times i prefer to give it a day or at least 6hours minimum.... i have also heard they head to water and have noticed that is usually the case....i have learned by my own mistakes on gut shot deer: when i first started hunting i jumped a doe that i gut shot....i thought when i returned the next day that i wouldnt find her....she had bedded 2 times -the first bed was less than 20yds where i bumped her...the next bed was 15ft from that one-about 30yds from that was white belly hair sticking up and my doe.That one could have turned out bad,i salvaged all that i could -it's the right thing to do,but im not going to candy coat it,i lost a lot of meat also.

User avatar
Ohio farms
 
Posts: 1929
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 11:13 am
Location: Mentor, Ohio

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby Ohio farms » Mon Feb 21, 2011 5:56 pm

The only thing that I would add is that if you are going to enlist help, make sure that they are the type of hunters who do not easily give up. Nothing is worse than helpers that turn negative. It can be hard at times to stay positive, but I think it is extremely important that everyone is on the same page. When I'm trailing a deer, I always let the one who took the shot call the search to an end. Wounding and loosing a deer is a lousy thing. I'm sure that I will take every one of them to my grave.
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

werner.reiche
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Nov 26, 2010 11:10 am

RE: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby werner.reiche » Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:06 pm

ORIGINAL: borntotrack

In my just published book, Dead On!, I agree that waiting is a strong option when you have confirmed that the deer has been gut shot. However, the risks are great of loss to coyotes over night...in my area about 30%. The best solution is to use a trained, leashed tracking dog to find the deer. If the gut-shot deer has the power to move out of its bed, the dog can easily follow. Usually it is not difficult to walk it down.

Gut-shot deer do dehydrate and go to water where they die. This scenario does not apply to deer wounded in other ways.

John Jeanneney
www.deadonbook.com
www.born-to-track.com


I've got to strongly disagree with "Gut-shot deer do dehydrate and go to water where they die. This scenario does not apply to deer wounded in other ways." I've seen too many 'other wounded' deer head to water.

Jmc
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 4:46 pm

Re: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby Jmc » Wed May 18, 2011 5:50 pm

One morning i was bow hunting with my buddy and i saw a deer about 45 yards from my stand and it was walking humped up and it would walk 10-15 feet and circle like a dog and then lay down. I watched this for over a half hour and the deer was on the edge of a bedding area looking very uncomfortable. An hour or so later i found that my friend had shot a deer that morning and i looked at his arrow and sure enough gut. I asked him how the deer reacted after the shoot and he said that the deer walked off 40 yatrds and layed down and after 10 minutes it got up and walked a short distance and circled and layed down. Knowing where i saw the deer and where he shot it 2.5 hours prior i decieded to track the deer. Small drops of blood at first and then nothing. The olnly thing i did have to follow seemed to be a clear liquid of some kind and not that much either. Being approx 4.5 hours later we were now where i last saw the deer and sure enough some clear fluid. My buddy said the deer was maybe a 2 year old and approx 90 lbs dressed we continued on now following turned leaves and being very quiet and at a snails pace. We followed aother two hours and finally caught sight of her, as we watched she got back up and walked a short distance circled and layed down. She did not wobble or studder so we decieded to get my buddy up a head of the deer and i would continue to follow this way he could get a shot at her if she detected me. and hour later he shot her the second time in the boiler room and off she went another 35 yarsd before she heaped up. I had hunted this piece of woods over twenty years and i would not think that that deer would have taken the route that she did. If you can determine that indeed you gut shot the deer and have plenty of daylight i would wait 2 hours and then very slowly try to follow the deer. Remember that a snails pace may be to fast but you may also be a ble to set up on the deer somewhere down the line.. Remember also that this was a small deer and i would expext a larger deer to travel twice the distance and possibly heavier cover. If the deer was hit just before dark i would wait until the morning and then follow the same tactic.

User avatar
Ohio farms
 
Posts: 1929
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 11:13 am
Location: Mentor, Ohio

Re: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby Ohio farms » Sat May 21, 2011 3:55 am

I could not have said it better...
Keep life simple...if you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.

freak nasty 145
 
Posts: 111
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:46 am

Re: Dan's Question of the Week: Trailing Gut-Shot Deer

Postby freak nasty 145 » Sat May 21, 2011 11:43 am

Gut shot a deer last fall and waited till the next morning to track her down. I knew it was a gut shot by looking and smelling my arrow. I looked and looked never found her. Really upsetting.
"Any sportsman who can kill his deer without the tingling spine, the quick clutch at his heart, the delicious trembling of nerve fibers when the game is finally down, has no place in the deer woods." Lawrence R. Koller. (1948).

PreviousNext

Return to Deer & Deer Hunting Features

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests