Fruit trees

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easports
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:07 am

Fruit trees

Postby easports » Thu Apr 08, 2010 2:16 am

I'm ready to try my hand again in planting several trees (apple) but wanted to ask a question.  To increase the survival of the tree it will need a certain amount of water until the root system develops.  Do you hope mother natures produces enough rain to keep the tree sustained?  Has any used any type of drip irrigation system?  I've read about several but can't find one with a programmable timer.  If you set up one that's gravity fed, is that too much water?

msbadger
 
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Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2008 3:59 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby msbadger » Thu Apr 08, 2010 5:06 am

 I recycle and save my plastic milk jugs....fill them up and put just a pin hole or two in the bottom...place a few  around each tree....make sure to tie a string around each handle and to a sml. stake...so when empty they don't blow away...this has worked for me

PS...I start with cold water...as the sun heats it the pressure in jug forces the water out

easports
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:07 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby easports » Thu Apr 08, 2010 7:21 am

msbadger

How often do you refill the jugs? My concern is being in the field to much. If I can set up a system to water the trees once a day for 5 to 7 days give a take some days with rain, I can refill the 5 or 10 gal container once every 10 to 15 days.

bowman12
 
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Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:54 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby bowman12 » Mon May 24, 2010 6:32 am

This is something I've heard and don't know alot about it but it may be something you might want to think about before you set up a drip type watering system.
I've been told that if you water trees too much they'll develop a large majority of their roots near the surface and when you quit your watering it can be difficult for them if there is a drought. In comparison, if you water them heavy once in a while they'll develop there roots in a more natural way and there roots will develop deeper into the ground to reach the water below. Like I said, it's something I've been told and don't know how much truth is to it, but it does make sense.
I planted 11 apple trees this spring and had to water them about once every 10 days for the first month to make sure they were going to be ok, but lately we've gotten so much rain I haven't watered them at all and I don't think I'll need to again this season unless the ground gets very dry. I've been digging down near the tree and the soil is moist an inch or two below the surface and I'm assuming that's plenty good to prevent them from drying out.

easports
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:07 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby easports » Mon May 24, 2010 10:34 am

Bowman12

Thanks for your input. Couple of things: how do you get enough water to 11 trees? Last year I tried planting apple trees but both died. I believe the problem was related to two things: one I buried the trees to deep and second, they did not get enough water. This year I talked to more people regarding these trees and found out that you have to dig a hold 2 ½ times wider than the root ball to allow the root s to expand. 1/3 of the root ball should be at or above the surface with mulch covering the top. And last is water…..I was told that new trees require more water for the first three month to get adjusted to the new area. This property is 25 miles from my home with no water source. My thought was I don't want to be on the property that much so how can I do that? Before I planted the tree, I installed a drip line under the surface down by the bottom of the root ball 2 feet wider than the ball to force the roots to expand. I've watered the trees several times but Mother Nature lately has been really helping out. My biggest concern was the July/August time frame. Here in VA it will hot and dry. Come September, it will be fine. Take a look at the attachment.


Image

Image

bowman12
 
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RE: Fruit trees

Postby bowman12 » Tue Aug 31, 2010 5:09 am

I just saw this now, very cool set up to keep the trees wet.
How are they looking? Did they make it?

easports
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:07 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby easports » Tue Aug 31, 2010 10:29 am

I've got this set up on two trees and both are doing well. The drip irrigation disburses water at a slow rate. The tube is buried 2 feet outside the root ball to promote root growth. I was thinking about hooking up a timer that would disburse water to the tree every other day but never did.

I tried to grow two trees last year and both died because mother nature did not help enough with the watering issue.

bmt4413
 
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RE: Fruit trees

Postby bmt4413 » Wed Sep 01, 2010 4:33 pm

when planting trees and shrubs you want the top of the rootball to be in line with the top of the hole you are digging not 1/3 above. This will lead to the tree drying out quicker. There are many landscape supply providers that have products to help with this. Type in treegator to your search engin. This is a bag that slowly allows water to seep into the groiund around your tree. Mulching also helps, but do not pille the mulch high on the trunk of the tree. This can cause the same problems as planthing to deep. Also roots will begin to grow into the mulch if the tree survives promoting roots above the soil level can also lead to drying out.

Bowman-your kind of backwards on the root growrth. Sporadic watering will cause the roots to grow near the surface because there is not enough resources for the roots to get deep. So they spread on the surface to get whatever minimal water that is available. When provided with enough water the roots of the tree will grow deeper as well as spread so it can access the water available at deeper levels. This can also be determined by the type of tree as well. Oaks have large deep tap roots- most canopy species do. Where smaller understory, field, or edge species like fruit trees typically branch out closer to to surface. Each have their niche they fill that allows them to survive in specific conditions.

DeerAddict
 
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RE: Fruit trees

Postby DeerAddict » Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:28 am

Where do you guys get the apple trees??? Do you start from seeds? or do you buy them from somewhere?

easports
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:07 am

RE: Fruit trees

Postby easports » Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:47 am

I purchased both of my trees through a local nursery. Both trees were 6' tall with blooms at the time of purchase. This year I did have several small apples. I'm looking toward to next year. I understand it will take several years to get a high yield of fruit. The first year is mostly the growth and stability of the tree.

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