Hunting on bicycle

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scottflesher
 
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Location: SE Ohio

RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby scottflesher » Tue Sep 28, 2010 1:49 pm

ORIGINAL: bakabob

I have used a bike to get to my stand. If you have a reasonable path or logging road or such to ride on while gong to your stand it works fairly well. It is faster and takes less energy than walking and I believe it leaves less scent . There are some disadvantages though. Totting all your equipment and a gun does make riding a bike a little difficult. I tried using a sling for the gun but didn't like that so I made a rack for the gun across the handle bars and that worked fairly well. I used a large basket over the back wheel for the rest of my junk. Everything you add though makes balancing a little harder. I also tried pulling a small trailer behind the bike and that worked best for me. I made the trailer using an old set of bike wheels. I even transported my climber that way. Riding in the dark is risky as it is hard to dodge the sticks and stones and such that can throw you. A good headlight is a must.


Mighty, As I was reading this I found myself thinking "man I'd pay a substancial sum of money to see that" and I actually wondered if you were reading this thread. Two posts later, not to my suprize, you added one of your classic pictures.
[:D]

mightyfofaad
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby mightyfofaad » Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:58 pm

ORIGINAL: scottflesher

Mighty, As I was reading this I found myself thinking "man I'd pay a substancial sum of money to see that" and I actually wondered if you were reading this thread. Two posts later, not to my suprize, you added one of your classic pictures.
[:D]


I got a kick out of those photos because "that guy" reminded me of the tough, no nonsense, no bells & whistles men of my father's generation. If they had to do something, they did it ... whether it was hard or easy wasn't part of their thought process.

I don't know how 1/2 of even my generation turned out to be a bunch of thoughtless, selfish pansies. And today's generation ... forgetaboutit.
[:(]

USN_Sam1385
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby USN_Sam1385 » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:25 am

ORIGINAL: mightyfofaad

ORIGINAL: scottflesher

Mighty, As I was reading this I found myself thinking "man I'd pay a substancial sum of money to see that" and I actually wondered if you were reading this thread. Two posts later, not to my suprize, you added one of your classic pictures.
[:D]


[size="4"]I got a kick out of those photos because "that guy" reminded me of the tough, no nonsense, no bells & whistles men of my father's generation. If they had to do something, they did it ... whether it was hard or easy wasn't part of their thought process.

I don't know how 1/2 of even my generation turned out to be a bunch of thoughtless, selfish pansies. And today's generation ... forgetaboutit. [/size] [:(]


I understand what you are saying. However, my generation (I am currently 25) is facing the worst economy since the 1930's. Furthermore, we are involved in the longest war overseas in US history, and we are the age group that is dying over there every single day. (For the most part). Finally, a college degree used to mean something, and Unions use to be a powerful force. Not only are the jobs all but gone; the unions have been almost destroyed, and a college degree is like the new high school diploma.

I think that our generation is going to turn out to be one of the toughest, most adaptable, and hard working generations in our country's history. Give us a chance brother.

scottflesher
 
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Location: SE Ohio

RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby scottflesher » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:32 pm

Sounds like my generation is right in between you both. I think that sometimes in an effort to improve our situations we make them worse. We just need to use common sense. I'll give you one example without being too political. Recently unemployement benefits were extended to 99 weeks. I have a friend out of a job and he's been complaining about companies not hiring. Part of the reason that companies aren't hiring from my observation (and I'm responsible for the budget in my department) is that now my company, along with every other company in the state, is required to pay an extra 10% (based on overall department's salaries) to cover the extension of unemployement benefits. Now the department I work in has about 1 million in salary dollars. That means that we pay an additional $100,000 in tax towards the unemployement benefit extension.
While I have a ton of empathy for the unemployed of our nation, without this extra tax, we could hire more people. My friend actually told me when he found out the benefits were extended, "man i'm glad that happened, my benefit period was almost up and then I would have had to go look for a job". What kind of attitude is that.
Sadly, (and it's not specific to a generation) too many people want something for nothing. There seems to be a sense of entitlement that wasn't as prevalant in the past. We just need to do what makes sense, and you are right Sam, all generations will perservere.

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bowhuntr15
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby bowhuntr15 » Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:19 am

I hunt ONLY public lands.  Bikes are essential to cove some ground, access further away areas, etc.  Especially when so many hunters are not willing to go the extra mile (no pund intended).  The hunting pressure is lower, hunters push deer your direction, and it makes for an awesome day with nature.  Yes, you may sweat, but if paced and dressed as light as possible, it is well worth it.  I've shot my biggest bucks after bike riding.  I've had my most awesome and rewarding hunts from riding my bike to what we call the "southend".  The bike may add diversity to your hunting, if you'd like.  See my simple set up.  With it, I can haul my deer cart with my stand, pack, and other misc. items as needed. 
"Perseverance, Practice, Integrity"

mightyfofaad
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby mightyfofaad » Sun Oct 10, 2010 8:39 am

ORIGINAL: bowhuntr15

I hunt ONLY public lands.  Bikes are essential to cove some ground, access further away areas, etc.  Especially when so many hunters are not willing to go the extra mile (no pund intended).  The hunting pressure is lower, hunters push deer your direction, and it makes for an awesome day with nature.  Yes, you may sweat, but if paced and dressed as light as possible, it is well worth it.  I've shot my biggest bucks after bike riding.  I've had my most awesome and rewarding hunts from riding my bike to what we call the "southend".  The bike may add diversity to your hunting, if you'd like.  See my simple set up.  With it, I can haul my deer cart with my stand, pack, and other misc. items as needed. 


I'm impressed! Just wish the roads/paths that I use weren't so steep & rough ... or as my dog says, "ruff."

berudd
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby berudd » Sun Oct 10, 2010 10:42 am

So for those of you that have not ridden a mountain bike off road and are considering it just a couple of thoughts from someone who has ridden mountain bikes for many years.

1. You WILL need an establised trail or road to make this work. You won't be able to take off through the woods in any direction you choose. The ground clutter makes for a pretty spongy surface making progress very slow. You'll be faster and more efficient on foot. Maybe somewhere in the west it would work but in your basic hardwood forrest you need to build a trail first. If a trail exists and it is tough on foot it will be impossible on a bike. Yeah, there are some guys who could ride it but if you are considering getting a bike to do this, you ain't one of them. Also, it most areas it is illegal to ride a bike off of previously established trails
2. Get a decent bike. Like the previous guys said department store bikes are not the way to go and may actually be dangerous. Get a mountain bike, not a hybrid, from a reliable OEM. You don't have to buy a new bike (craigslist) but a stroll through a couple bikes stores will aquaint you with the brands. I agree that TREK is a brand you can trust.
3. It will be harder than you think it is so you better practice a bit before opening day.

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Everyday Hunter
 
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RE: Hunting on bicycle

Postby Everyday Hunter » Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:27 pm

ORIGINAL: berudd

3. It will be harder than you think it is so you better practice a bit before opening day.

True, and I've been riding well-established trails.

Steve
When the Everyday Hunter isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.
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