Climber Stand Challenged

Have you ever fallen? Share your story ... it might save someone else's life!
fairchasehunter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri May 28, 2010 5:59 am

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby fairchasehunter » Fri Aug 20, 2010 7:33 am

I almost forgot the most important point. I use a cinch strap on the top seat part to secure the stand to the tree. That way when I lean on it, it doesn't budge. You aren't going to hunt or shoot well when you think the stand is ready to throw you out on the least movement.

brentru
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:34 pm

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby brentru » Sun Aug 22, 2010 3:51 am

Here is one more for you based on my experience.  Not all climbing stands have the straps which allow you to cinch the upper and lower halves together.  The two benefits of these straps are that they essentially lock the stand to the tree and they keep the two halves from separating so that you won't be left high and dry on the tree.  If you are on a tree that has a smooth, hard trunk, these are critical as is ensuring that the teeth are firmly set into the bark.  For some manufacturers these are standard parts.  If the manufacturer doesn't include these, you can buy them aftermarket.

Depending on the area that I'm hunting, I will take my stand out or leave it in the woods.  If I leave it, I always lock it to the tree.  Leaving it locked to the tree just makes getting set up a little bit quicker and quieter.

As previously mentioned, having a level stand at the height that you wish to hunt will mean that you will have anywhere from a slight to an extreme angle on the stand at ground level.  If the trunk doesn't taper much, the angle won't be severe when you hook the stand to the tree.  I've been on trees where the angle was about 45 degrees at ground level.  It takes some getting used to and practice will help you determine what the best angle is for your first time up.  If you hunt the same tree on multiple occasions, it might be helpful to note what your link count is or what holes your cable is using so that the guess work is eliminated when you are climbing up the tree before first light.  One thing that I would caution you against is trying to reset you cable/chain configuration once you are up the tree because you didn't guess the starting angle right.  It is extremely high risk and is just inviting a really bad day.  If you need to adjust it, climb down the tree, adjust the stand and go back up.

webfoot
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 5:36 am

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby webfoot » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:33 am

I have used a Summit Viper climber for the last 8-9 years and love it. I have not used any other climbers, so I don't have anything to compare, but the Viper is a very comfortable stand for all day sitting. The seat height is adjustable to accomodate gun and bow hunting. Its cable attachment to the tree is quiet, quick, and solid.

A DVD comes with the stand that does a great job of showing how to use the climber in a safe manner. Practice with the stand at low level until you feel comfortable using it. I use the climbing rope/harness religiously and I've never felt unsafe while climbing or at height. A cinch strap is supplied to hold the two sections nested together for transport and then used to hold the seat section tight to the tree at height. Also, a section of rope connects the two sections while using to prevent the bottom section from dropping away from you.

The previous posts answered your question about trimming limbs; do it preseason if you can to prevent noise/odors but have a folding saw/pruner handy for those times you decide to climb a new tree. I have certain trees that I continue to use each year that I clean-up preseason if new sprouts pop out.

Pine and sweet gum trees are prevalent where I hunt and I prefer the sweetgum over the pine. Both are soft wood trees and are weak if undersized ( I climb ones 18"-22" wide at base ) but generally straight and fairly free of limbs to climbing height. The pine bark is loud and flakes off so you have to be careful to completely "seat" the teeth of the climber for a good hold; thats why I like the sweet gum. Its bark is textured and the teeth of the stand dig in easily.

Which ever climber you decide to buy just make sure to be safe and follow the instructions. Good luck!

Michigander
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:41 pm

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby Michigander » Tue Sep 07, 2010 1:47 pm

Hey deeraddict, there's another way! Before you jump into a climber you may want to check out a treesuit and a set of lone wolf climbing sticks. The treesuit is basically a harness with a seat that you wear into and out of the woods and strap to the tree once you get up in it. Also has an integrated (seconary) safety line. I've hunted climbers, and granted, they are comfy. However, they are scary going up and down a bit bulky to carry and rather noisy. Not to mention that you are pretty limited on tree selection. With the set-up I mentioned above, I can go from the base of just about any tree to full fledged hunting in about 12 minutes. And it's quiet, if you're more that 40 yards from me, you'll never even know I'm setting up. The sacrifice, as I mentioned, is comfort. It's not uncomfortable, but an all day hunt would be a bit much.
If you want more specifics or have any questions feel free to give me a shout.

DeerAddict
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 12:18 pm

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby DeerAddict » Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:22 pm

Thanks for the advice Michigander!
 
Where would you find a treesuit at?? Do they have them at Cabelas or Basspro?? Or some other place?
~Thnks

User avatar
Cut N Run
 
Posts: 540
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:21 am

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby Cut N Run » Wed Sep 08, 2010 10:39 am

I like that a climbing stand can be repositioned to get the sun out of your eyes or give you the ability to look a different way without having to make a huge production of it.

I use a Cadillac climber that faces the tree. I took an old pick-up truck window rifle rack and cut the bottom rack off, then bolted it to the back of my stand. When I go up or down the tree, so does my rifle. I also take a bungee cord and attach it around the tree at the correct height so I know where to stop in the dark. Then, I take the bungee and secure it to the stand to help keep pressure on the foot climber so it doesn't slip out of place. That stand also has locks which guarantee it will be there the next morning if you leave it overnight.

We hunt overlooking large cutovers and can easliy climb 30-45 feet up in pines or poplars to give us a better sight and scent advantage. They can be challenging to hunt out of on windy days, but what besides the ground isn't?

We also do the majority of our limb & shooting lane clearing in the winter during the off-season so the deer have time to get used to it. No telling how many deer I've killed from a climbing treestand, but it has been a lot.

Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad

Michigander
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:41 pm

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby Michigander » Wed Sep 08, 2010 2:40 pm

Hey addict, as far as I know, the treesuit is only availible online thus far. If I'm not mistaken, Lone Wolf has bought the company since I purchased mine. At any rate you can go to www.treesuit.com for more information. After looking at the video, you'll without doubt be scratching your head saying "really"? lol
But trust me, it really works. I've shot three bucks in the last two seasons including the largest bow kill of my career. If you've never used lone wolf climbing sticks, you'll absolutely fall in love with them. I've tried about every hairbrained idea you can imagine to get into a tree quickly and quietly..........this is it. And they only weight about 7 pounds for a set of 3. Add about another 7 pounds for the tree suit and you're off the the races without a big clumbsy stand hanging off your back. Wear the suit around your waist, sticks across your back.
Hope this helps. If you decide to go for it, give me a shout. There are a few little hints I can give you to make your suit a little more user friendly than how they send it to you.

MSHunter
 
Posts: 403
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:32 am

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby MSHunter » Wed Sep 08, 2010 3:53 pm

Michigander,
I've looked at the Tree Suit and the Tree Saddle in the past, but have decided on purchasing a climber as I'm primarily a public land hunter and can not use screw in tree steps (nothing can be used that damages the tree). Isn't it a lot of up and down to get the next climbing stick and strap it to the tree? How do you deal with this?

MSHunter
 
Posts: 403
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:32 am

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby MSHunter » Thu Sep 09, 2010 12:10 pm

ORIGINAL: webfoot

I have used a Summit Viper climber for the last 8-9 years and love it. I have not used any other climbers, so I don't have anything to compare, but the Viper is a very comfortable stand for all day sitting. The seat height is adjustable to accomodate gun and bow hunting. Its cable attachment to the tree is quiet, quick, and solid.

A DVD comes with the stand that does a great job of showing how to use the climber in a safe manner. Practice with the stand at low level until you feel comfortable using it. I use the climbing rope/harness religiously and I've never felt unsafe while climbing or at height. A cinch strap is supplied to hold the two sections nested together for transport and then used to hold the seat section tight to the tree at height. Also, a section of rope connects the two sections while using to prevent the bottom section from dropping away from you.

The previous posts answered your question about trimming limbs; do it preseason if you can to prevent noise/odors but have a folding saw/pruner handy for those times you decide to climb a new tree. I have certain trees that I continue to use each year that I clean-up preseason if new sprouts pop out.

Pine and sweet gum trees are prevalent where I hunt and I prefer the sweetgum over the pine. Both are soft wood trees and are weak if undersized ( I climb ones 18"-22" wide at base ) but generally straight and fairly free of limbs to climbing height. The pine bark is loud and flakes off so you have to be careful to completely "seat" the teeth of the climber for a good hold; thats why I like the sweet gum. Its bark is textured and the teeth of the stand dig in easily.

Which ever climber you decide to buy just make sure to be safe and follow the instructions. Good luck!


I'm looking at purchasing the Summit Viper in the next week or so. Can anyone tell me the difference between the Summit Viper, $259.99 on Cabela's websit and the Realtree Outfitter Viper Ultra, $229.99 on Cabela's? They look like the same stand, but one is $30.00 cheaper than the other.

Michigander
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:41 pm

RE: Climber Stand Challenged

Postby Michigander » Thu Sep 09, 2010 2:34 pm

MS,
I know what you mean about the state land. Comprises about 95% of my hunting. What I do is carry a 4th climbing stick and put it at the same level as the third but on the opposite side of the tree. I use the tops of the sticks as my foot rest / to stand when the time comes.
I only go up the tree one time. I put the first stick on the tree, normally there is a branch or something that you can hang the next one on before you leave the ground. The third stays in my hand, go up two steps on the first stick and attach the next stick. the last one should be in reach to repeat. If no limbs, I turn the cleats on the stick so they'll hang in the waistline of my belt and up I go. My bow being attached to a self retracting bow rope clipped to the back of my treesuit.
Now don't let me fool ya, it takes a little practice. lol
Best thing is no cutting limbs on the way up and you don't have to be too fussy about tree selection. If the tree you want has branches, or is crooked the sticks will get you up there without turning the tree into a telephone pole. I also believe that "hugging" the tree really helps break up your siloette.
My wife started hunting last year and is using one as well, she seems to like it. My buddy on the other hand, didn't didn't have the patience to properly stow the strap and safety line at the end of hunting. He came out of the woods looking like somebody hog tied him every night. lol Got a good deal on the wifes set up. lol
Hope this sheds some light. It's not the cure all, but it works well for me and my situations.

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