Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

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bobow
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby bobow » Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:54 am

Would new proposed USDA testing requirements have put the small country meat processors who hunters often employ to butcher their wild game out of business?


I called the local small processor to see what their thoughts were on this.

The recording said " We are officially closed".  I left a message asking to clarify the statement but it doesn't sound good. [:@]

From the article it doesn't sound like the regulations are in effect yet?  I hope there is some way to stop this madness.
Thomas Jefferson, 1774 July. "The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time."

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Everyday Hunter
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby Everyday Hunter » Tue Aug 10, 2010 12:11 pm

ORIGINAL: Ohio farms

It will not affect who processes my deer since my butcher is me.

That was my first thought, too. But then I asked myself, "What's to stop them from prohibiting home butchering?"

Steve
When the Everyday Hunter isn't hunting, he's thinking about hunting, talking about hunting, dreaming about hunting, writing about hunting, or wishing he were hunting.
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tonyotony
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby tonyotony » Wed Aug 11, 2010 2:51 pm

I don't know about anyplace else, but here in NY, no one is allowed to sell meat from wild game, and I believe the USDA rules are for meat that will be sold. Up here, if we don't process the meat ourselves, hunters take it to the local guy who does it in his garage or basement, and I haven't heard any horror stories. There are a few commercial businesses that will make sausage from the venison we bring them, but again, it is not for sale to the public; all the meat is returned to the hunter, so I don't know that the USDA rules would apply to them either.

bowboxer
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby bowboxer » Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:04 am

i don't mean to come off as a jerk, but i disagree.i started out taking my deer to the butchers because i didn't know whats,what on a deer and how to cut it.but now i do it myself or take it to the butcher depending on the time i have to do the butchering.i ran across a guy last year that said that he takes his deer to hte butcher because he didn't know whats what on a deer and how to cut,the same as i did.he said know one would show him anything.i took the time to show him and come to find out people was taking his tenderlion and saying that the meat they was getting wasn't the best of the deer. my piont is some people just don't know and some just don't have the time.if i take a deer to the bucthers it costs 40 dollars forever thing i want done.

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bobow
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby bobow » Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:39 am

I got a call back from the local processor that I use after leaving a message on 8/10.  He did confirm the regs do not apply to him since all he processes is wild game and he does not sell to the public.

He was in scrubbing up for the season opener on 10/1 in IL
Thomas Jefferson, 1774 July. "The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time."

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Cut N Run
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby Cut N Run » Tue Nov 02, 2010 10:12 am

ORIGINAL: Stickman

Here it is the subject I have been preaching for years. If I kill a deer I process it myself, from kill to freezer. There is no one that I know or work with that does the same. God gave me the meat so I will take care of it myself. Everybody that I know say I will kill it but I will not touch it. So I say go to the store and buy it and stay out of my woods. The thrill of the kill I say money but no brain, fool. WHAT SAY YOU.



I do the gutting & skinning, but I am lucky to have a good processor who does a great job cutting, grinding, making sausage, and packaging what I take him. I am happy to keep him in business and keep money in the local community. I don't have the time or place to totally process a deer by myself. By being able to drop my deer off and have it kept in cold storage to age before it is processed, I get better tasting meat that what I could do myself.

I've done the entire job by myself before, but prefer to have someone who does it daily & therefore faster complete the task. He also uses a vacuum sealer to package the meat, which I don't have. I already have a job that I am better at than I am at cutting deer up. I prefer that butchering be done by a professional.

I say this; Watch who you're calling fool. I end up with more free time to do as I please without the mess. You do what works for you and I'll do what works for me.

Jim
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shaman
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby shaman » Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:42 pm

I decided I'd wondered enough about this, so I called Jake at Myers General Store and Locker in Lenoxburg, KY.  Here is a summation of what Jake had to say.

He was not aware of any changes coming his way.  He is open for business as usual.  His operation "is strickly a custom meat processor. "  Everything he packages has "NOT FOR SALE" on it.  He added that as a result he does not have as much  to worry about with the USDA.  He has state, county and local overview, but those sanitation and testing requirements are not as stringent as the USDA. Jake said there are many processors in the county, some operating out of garages and the USDA has absolutely no control over these either. 

Looking back on my days with Pierre Frozen Foods, which was under strict USDA control, I can vouche that things were not the same.  There, the USDA was on-site 24 hours a day.  They were there to protect the food supply going to consumers.  I remember tales of the bad old days where employees would try to bring in deer to process on the sly and were bounced out in a hurry-- USDA could have shut the plant down and it would have cost the company tens of thousands of dollars before it could re-open. You don't want someone's stanky old deer carcass hanging next to 20 tons of pork shoulder.  To give you an idea, if a USDA inspector had caught me walking into the plant without my beard protector or hair net on, he could have shut the plant down. We had a full time microbiologist on staff.  Things were extremely tight.

Put in this perspective, I can tell you that we may be talking about two wholly different things here.  One, is the big meat processing plants that are now going to require an extra $1/2 mil  in testing.  This may or may not be a bad thing.  I was working for Hudson foods when they had the big 10 million lb beef recall back in 1997.  If there really had been E-Coli  in their burger, it could have been a disaster to families across the country. Hudson was a major supplier to Burger King as well as the nations schools.  As it was, Hudson's recall yielded a return of about 10,000 lbs (.1%)-- the rest had passed through the gut of the nation's hungry without incident. Still Hudson had to go out of business, because of the scare.

On the other hand, in this context, we're talking about custom meat processors, who don't sell what they process to the general public.  I've seen Jake take in sides of beef, buffalo, hog, etc.  The slaughter takes place off site and Jake has no control over the quality of the meat coming in, only the cleanliness of his own operation.  It's hard to control things when your customers are bringing you raw sides thrown in the back of a pickup truck with only some cardboard laid down to keep the blood off the truck bed.  In this case, the USDA has no jurisdiction.

Jake is in normal operation. I would suggest anyone who has a mind to do so, should start  showing up at their store  on the Willow Lenoxburg road on Saturday, November 13 a little after 10 AM and start watching the deer stack up like cordwood in front of the store.    Ron or Granny will be behind the counter. Jake will be down in the basement taking in deer.  Drop by, grab a seat by the window, and watch the show.

http://picasaweb.google.com/Genesis924Min/MyersStore?feat=directlink

PS: Ask Jake about Ron and the Deer Pearls.
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eagle1953
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby eagle1953 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:08 pm

Deleted by poster
I don`t kill innocet animals, just the ones that look guilty.

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eagle1953
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby eagle1953 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:11 pm

ORIGINAL: eagle1953

I beg to differ, I use to live and work in the rice captial of the world. Which is Stuttgart, Arkansas they ship rice all over the world. If your buying rice from over seas your buying the wrong rice.
ORIGINAL: vipermann7

We (the US) buys rice from overseas where the sewage ditches over run when it rains, flooding the rice patties with raw sewage. Yeah, makes sense to put good, clean, hard working meat processors out of business.[:@]

I don`t kill innocet animals, just the ones that look guilty.

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eagle1953
 
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RE: Will USDA Put Your Venison Processor Out of Business?

Postby eagle1953 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 5:13 pm

try agin
I don`t kill innocet animals, just the ones that look guilty.

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