Advice Greatly Needed!

Bowhunting experiences, the best way to tune a bow -- share your knowledge here!
bowboxer
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby bowboxer » Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:48 pm

the carbons are tough,i think you get better penetration.

MSHunter
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby MSHunter » Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:51 pm

ORIGINAL: muzzyswuirrel@gmail.

ok i have carbons now. whats the difference? weight or performance?


I may be wrong, and if so, one of the other forum members will set me straight. Carbon arrows provide increased performance in terms of speed, straightness and spine at a reduced weight as compared to wood or aluminum arrows.
"This is the world we are born into -- we should never let that slip away from us. May it never cease to stimulate, inspire and humble us." from Stalking & Still-Hunting: The Ground Hunter's Bible by G. Fred Asbell

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vipermann7
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby vipermann7 » Tue Nov 30, 2010 10:03 pm

If you're like most of us bowhunters, you're probably going to find yourself buying things, then rebuying them over and over! I've been bowhunting for quite a while and every couple of years I still end up buying something new and different just to try it. Sometimes I like it, sometimes I dont.

You're quesiton about the whisker biscuit: good rest. I definitely recommend it, especially for someone just starting out. I've been hunting for years and still use it. Keep in mind they do wear out eventually, and you have to buy the replacement biscuit, but they actually last quite awhile. I replace my biscuit every year or so, but I shoot a couple thousand arrows a season. The biscuits do work the best with the short 2" vanes, and I wouldn't use the biscuit at all with quickspin vanes, but even with some helical to them, the 2" vanes shoot just fine.

I wouldn't bother with a kisser button, thats just my opinion. Some guys like them, but if you get a good consistent anchor point with your hand, you shouldnt need one. A peep also helps that, and I would recommend you use a peep. Sounds like you got that covered. For a stabilizer, I have used a limbsavers S-coil since they came out several years back. I like it.

Broadheads are a huge topic. first you gotta decide if you want to go with mechanicals or a fixed blade. For starting out, I would recommend getting a good fixed blade. Theres a lot of good ones out there. Thunderheads have a long reputation of being good, G5 makes some good ones like the Montec that a lot of guys like, and it seems like you can never go wrong with any kind of Muzzy. You don't have to buy the most expensive, but I with broadheads, i would stay away from the cheap discount brands. they don't seem to fly consistent from my experience.
I personally use Rage mechanical broadheads, but that's just what works for me. As you shoot and hunt, you'll develop youre own preference for every piece of equipment you use. The broadhead debate goes on for ages, and if you search the archives here on D&DH youll find some pretty in depth discussions on broadheads.

With arrows, again, I would avoid the cheapest of the cheap, but most arrows at your sporting goods stores are good arrows. No need to buy the most expensive. I pay about 40-50 dollars for 6 arrows and I've had good luck. Currently Im shooting some Goldtips. They make good arrows, as does Easton, and carbon express. There are others, but those are the brands I have personally used.

definitely invest in a laser rangefinder if you havent yet. It will be one piece of equipment you'll never want to leave home without once you use one. Its good to be practiced and judging distance on your own, but a rangefinder, to me, is a must. a lot of guys use them,and I think its a wise purchase.

I think woodswalker said it, but i will too. Its all about practice, and hunting within your effective range. Practice at least 10 yards farther than you want to hunt, thats the mark I use anyway. But withiin reason. dont launch arrows at 100 yards and randomly hit targets, then shoot at animals at 90 yards! I find my max distance that Im consistant at practicing, and then back myself down at least 10 yards for hunting situations. alot of guys dont shoot deer past 30 or 35 yards, and I think thats a good rule of thumb. Deer are unpredictable, tight strung animals. a lot can go wrong when an arrow travels 35 yards to hit a deer. also, whatever you're buying, its never about the equipment. buy quality stuff that wont break on you, but beyond that, its all in your hands and how much you practice. a $200 bow, $40 arrows, and sharp broadheads kill deer just as dead as a $900 bow and $200 arrows.

believe it or not, this is my brief version of ideas! take it for what its worth, and good luck.

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Woods Walker
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby Woods Walker » Tue Nov 30, 2010 11:15 pm

I may be wrong, and if so, one of the other forum members will set me straight. Carbon arrows provide increased performance in terms of speed, straightness and spine at a reduced weight as compared to wood or aluminum arrows.


A question here.......why would you want REDUCED arrow weight? I mean, it's MASS that increases penetration in an arrow, and that's what kills deer....not speed.
I would think that you'd want the heaviest arrow you could shoot well out of your bow, and then worry about speed.
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Wanderer
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby Wanderer » Wed Dec 01, 2010 7:47 am

muzzyswuirrel,
You may want to consider an Octane Hostage rest. It's like a whisker biscuit with a mohawk haircut. There are three brushes that hold the arrow in place , but there is no vane interference. They are about 40 bucks (or 70 bucks for the model with replaceable brushes).
They are standard on Diamond bow packages. I say that not to influence your choice of bow, but because you could handle and/or shoot a Diamond bow at the dealers to see how the rest works. If you're like me, you'll probably use one rest for a while, then start experimenting. Good luck and welcome to bowhunting

Image

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charlie 01
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby charlie 01 » Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:33 pm

I've been bow huntiing 40+ yrs.. Over those yrs. have used all kinds of rests. Always looking for the new and best to do the best job. The last 8yrs or so have used a NAP drop away, and consider drop aways to be the best bet, affording total arrow clearence. This year NAP came out with the "Apache. It is a drop away and I have one on each of my reg. and backup bows. I consider it to be the ultimate rest. Best I have ever used. Easy to set up, quiet, and has total arrow containment (can never fall off rest). And nothing to wear out. I highly reccomend it. Price is decent too.
Arrows, for many yrs. have used aluminums, till I tried carbons. They are the way to go. I use Carbon Express with 4" vanes. I prefer the larger vanes as they are more forgiving. I tried blazer vanes but did not have consistant arrow flight. Sometimes it pays to buy or try a few different types of arrows or vanes to see what flies best.
Broadheads, there are tons to choose from. A lot of people seem to be happy wih the "Rage". For my own reasons I stick to the older fixed blade in 125gr.. I like the weight for penitration. And I prefer to sharpen my own. I am able to do things that I can't with expandibles.
And as some people have already stated, practice, practice, and practice some more. Get to know your equipment and what you can do with it.
Also, when ever I make major changes to my bow I do a "paper test". It will tell you how your arrow is coming out of the bow. If you want and have no one to explain this procedure, I can supply that info.   
never say never
patience is the companion of wisdom

MSHunter
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby MSHunter » Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:00 pm

ORIGINAL: Woods Walker

I may be wrong, and if so, one of the other forum members will set me straight. Carbon arrows provide increased performance in terms of speed, straightness and spine at a reduced weight as compared to wood or aluminum arrows.


A question here.......why would you want REDUCED arrow weight? I mean, it's MASS that increases penetration in an arrow, and that's what kills deer....not speed.
I would think that you'd want the heaviest arrow you could shoot well out of your bow, and then worry about speed.



I'm with you on more mass meaning increased penetration of the arrow. I didn't mean to imply that lighter is necessarily better, there are definite trade offs between arrow weight, speed, trajectory, penetration. However, some individuals do promote the lighter weight of carbon arrows as a potential benefit.

The Bowhunter's Guide to Accurate Shooting by Lon Lauber lists the following in regards to carbon arrows: "the benefits of carbon arrows (durability, stiffness, light weight, flatter trajectory and cost)"
"This is the world we are born into -- we should never let that slip away from us. May it never cease to stimulate, inspire and humble us." from Stalking & Still-Hunting: The Ground Hunter's Bible by G. Fred Asbell

muzzyswuirrel@gmail.
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby muzzyswuirrel@gmail. » Wed Dec 01, 2010 5:05 pm

thanks again to everybody for their advice! it is greatly appreciated. could somebody please PM me and explain paper testing?
muzzysquirrel

muzzyswuirrel@gmail.
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby muzzyswuirrel@gmail. » Wed Dec 01, 2010 5:11 pm

ORIGINAL: Wanderer

muzzyswuirrel,
You may want to consider an Octane Hostage rest. It's like a whisker biscuit with a mohawk haircut. There are three brushes that hold the arrow in place , but there is no vane interference. They are about 40 bucks (or 70 bucks for the model with replaceable brushes).

Image


i read in reviews that it is poorly constructed, the screws dont stay in place, have to realign it a lot, the brushes wear down extremely quickly, and the rest slides in the horizontal axis. have you had any of these issues with yours?
muzzysquirrel

Swampbuckdown
 
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RE: Advice Greatly Needed!

Postby Swampbuckdown » Thu Dec 02, 2010 10:55 pm

Aluminum arrows typically give you more pass-through shots. They are prone to being bent or damaged and needing to be replaced more than carbon. Carbon are nice because you have more options as far as weight, stiffness, flexibility, etc.

I personally still use my Bear Element. $400 bow and I kill about 4 deer a year with it. Accurate, forgiving and durable. Whisker biscuits are real good during cold weather, you won't freeze your finger off while stalking with an arrow nocked. You only lose about 7-10fps vs other rests, and for beginners, it is a safe and easy rest to use. Don't even bother with a kisser. If you are taught to shoot correctly, they are obsolete. A wrist rope, stabilizer, cat silencers and a good sight are all good things to have.

As mentioned by walker. Practice is the most important thing you can do for bow hunting. I shoot year round, but I go at least once a week prior to deer season and try to get in to practice about that much even during season. You have to know your bow and know what YOU are capable of with it. Some guys don't shoot more than 20-30yds max, or they will miss or they fear to miss. Some shoot 40-50yds without thinking twice. It is about what you are comfortable with.

Some tips:

Don't use a string nock. Leaves to much room for variation in your shooting form.
Use a rubber peep sight. The only peepsite that truly keeps from twisting. Yes, the rubber can be a hassle during really cold weather, but they are the best peep sites.
Don't crush the handle of the bow, just like you don't crush the stock of your gun when your squeezing the trigger to shoot.
Start with a 3 pin sight, and set it up for 20-30-40 . Your 20yd pin will be good for anything from 5yds to 20.
Range finder a must. Unless you are a savant at judging distance. :)

Most of all, as Rick James once said....ENJOY YOURSELF!!!!!!!!!!!

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