Practice

Bowhunting experiences, the best way to tune a bow -- share your knowledge here!
Highlander Archery
 
Posts: 547
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 2:29 pm

RE: Practice

Postby Highlander Archery » Sat Jul 12, 2008 6:49 pm

Some great practice targets are available at Archery Game Cube
Lots of challenging games that can be adapted to your practice. You can set different yardages or angles too.

hunter480
 
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Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:44 am

RE: Practice

Postby hunter480 » Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:01 pm

ORIGINAL: Highlander Archery

ORIGINAL: hunter480

I`m doing well to remember everything about my form when trying to practice, much less purposely trying to mess it up.

Kisser button corner of the mouth, nose to string, DON`T squeeze the bow handle, pick the pin, elbow out, sqeeeeeeez the release............

[8D]




Form is the MOST important factor, once it is commited to memory you will automatically repeat it regardless of the odd position you find yourself in. Concentrate on your T-form and you will find yourself on target regardless of the scenario. You must still practice these odd positions once in awhile, which makes the sport more fun anyway

 
Help me with this...........
I`ve read, that it`s imperative, when shooting from an elevated stand, to not lean, but rather, to bend at the waist, when shooting downward at a sharp angle. Otherwise it disrupts form.
 
Is that correct?

Highlander Archery
 
Posts: 547
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 2:29 pm

RE: Practice

Postby Highlander Archery » Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:25 pm

ORIGINAL: hunter480

ORIGINAL: Highlander Archery

ORIGINAL: hunter480

I`m doing well to remember everything about my form when trying to practice, much less purposely trying to mess it up.

Kisser button corner of the mouth, nose to string, DON`T squeeze the bow handle, pick the pin, elbow out, sqeeeeeeez the release............

[8D]




Form is the MOST important factor, once it is commited to memory you will automatically repeat it regardless of the odd position you find yourself in. Concentrate on your T-form and you will find yourself on target regardless of the scenario. You must still practice these odd positions once in awhile, which makes the sport more fun anyway


Help me with this...........
I`ve read, that it`s imperative, when shooting from an elevated stand, to not lean, but rather, to bend at the waist, when shooting downward at a sharp angle. Otherwise it disrupts form.

Is that correct?


Yes, because you maintain your T. By leaning, you tend to raise the rear shoulder and lower your front shoulder slightly changing every other angle involved in executing the shot. To practice this and see what I mean, while standing on the ground draw the bow to anchor as normal, then bend at the waist to come on target(This is easier if you stand on a higher elevation than your target, it does not need to be much). Do this about 1/2 a dozen times(Do not worry about arrow placement at this time, just shoot a group) then try it with the 'lean' you will notice a significant difference. Then return to being on the same level as your target, close your eyes and draw the bow, open your eyes looking through your peep you should be above the target(if it is sitting on the ground) or on the target(if it is elevated above the ground), bend slightly at the waist till you are on the bullseye and shoot another group, repeat then lower arm or 'lean' to come on the bullseye more often than not you will shoot lower.

Keep in mind that treestand shooting also adds the factor of the ballistic arch of the arrow. So do this test from the ground

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OHhunter
 
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Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2008 10:23 am

RE: Practice

Postby OHhunter » Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:00 am

Like many already mentioned from a treestand both sitting and standing.  On the ground kneeling, sitting on my butt, and standing.  I also shoot with my climber on my back both kneeling and standing.  I have deer walk out in front of me all the time when traveling too and from my spot, I shot a 148 incher a couple years ago on my way back to the jeep 15 yds on the ground, face to face was one of my most memorable hunts.   Be prepared for anything. 

hunter480
 
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Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:44 am

RE: Practice

Postby hunter480 » Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:19 am

ORIGINAL: OHhunter

Like many already mentioned from a treestand both sitting and standing.  On the ground kneeling, sitting on my butt, and standing.  I also shoot with my climber on my back both kneeling and standing.  I have deer walk out in front of me all the time when traveling too and from my spot, I shot a 148 incher a couple years ago on my way back to the jeep 15 yds on the ground, face to face was one of my most memorable hunts.   Be prepared for anything. 

 
Awesome teaser of a story, about killing the buck off the ground while traveling.
 
Too cool.

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mag30079
 
Posts: 421
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 4:37 am

RE: Practice

Postby mag30079 » Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:46 am

I like practicing with abunch of balloons. There about vitals size and if you don't hit dead center the wind of the arrow will blow the balloon out of the way. Makes me try that much more. Try it out its fun, and if you shoot from all the crazy postions its that much harder

Boe_Hunter
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 6:25 pm

RE: Practice

Postby Boe_Hunter » Sun Jul 13, 2008 10:32 am

One thing to point out when thinking about form is DON'T.  When shooting at targets, the ONLY thought process in your head should be aiming.  When you want to work on technique, shoot blank bale.  To create proper mechanics, the blank bale practice is a must.  The biggest problem causing target panic is when you try to think about form and aiming at the same time while shooting at a target.  Simplify by training your shot process on the blank bale, then when a target is presented---AIM.
 
 

Highlander Archery
 
Posts: 547
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 2:29 pm

RE: Practice

Postby Highlander Archery » Sun Jul 13, 2008 4:28 pm

ORIGINAL: Boe_Hunter

One thing to point out when thinking about form is DON'T.  When shooting at targets, the ONLY thought process in your head should be aiming.  When you want to work on technique, shoot blank bale.  To create proper mechanics, the blank bale practice is a must.  The biggest problem causing target panic is when you try to think about form and aiming at the same time while shooting at a target.  Simplify by training your shot process on the blank bale, then when a target is presented---AIM.




BINGO

ARROWSMITH
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 5:48 am

RE: Practice

Postby ARROWSMITH » Tue Jul 22, 2008 7:26 am

Sailfish,
I don't know what your skill level is, so first I would make sure that I'm able to drive tacks at 30 to 40 yards and then start to work on the odd stuff.  Remember that all practice is good practice, weather it is shooting straight and level at the range or hanging upside down by your toes from a tree.  SHOOT SAFE, AND SHOOT OFTEN.  

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