Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

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fasteddie
 
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Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby fasteddie » Sun Mar 21, 2010 12:30 pm

I am 68 years old and certainly not as agile as I use to be . I have been considering a Climber Stand but wonder if I should just block it out of my mind . I am overweight and had a partial knee replacement . My oldest son advised me against using one . I can think of several spots where I hunt that a climber would be the best option . Should I stick to my ladder stands and ground blinds ? [8|]
Semper Fi !

dansden1
 
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RE: Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby dansden1 » Sun Mar 21, 2010 1:07 pm

Reply to Message   I am 64 and in need of a knee replacement.  Height is 5'8 232 lb. I ride a 4-wheeler into woods to save my knees with a climbing tree stand on the back.  My advice is to go to a hunting show in your state and try several brands of tree stands.  Get a good climber, don't get a cheap one.  Check the weight limit of the stand. 
 US Army in 1968.  Good luck. and good hunting  Dan

extroverted
 
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RE: Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby extroverted » Wed Mar 31, 2010 3:29 pm

Fast Eddie
I would steer clear of the climber stands unless you think you can do this, let's say the bottom of the stand slips out from under you and you need to hold onto the top portion to get your bottom repositioned so that you can climb. Do you think you can do this???
I am 6' tall I weigh in at 185 most of the year, I have lost the bottom on my climber and let me tell you it took everything I had to get in back into position to climb again try 45 min, sure you could use your safety system to get down but then you have to get back up again to bring your set-up down.
Now all your weight is going to go onto your knee while you are climbing are you ready for that???? I am talking about a ton of pressure.

Being over weight I would go with a ladder stand and even that will be a challenge, why because that tree stand has to hold your weight and I have yet to see one that has a large seat or foot print for someone overweight let alone fit me.

Why not save yourself and get a tent or even better work on building make shift blind that is 16' to 20' up, and will support all your weight. It's only going to take one fall and your knee or worse is going to say good bye!!!

Then hunting as you know it is all going to be in the past.
If it was me, I would not do it!!!

Besides I think they are far too noisy, and I have already switched to ladder stands just because of all the noise.

Hope this helps, be safe!!!
John

retiredsailor
 
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RE: Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby retiredsailor » Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:04 am

I realize that this forum is a little old and hasn't been active for a while, but I want to add my recent experience for what it's worth.

Was bow hunting with a buddy yesterday - he was using a cross-bow, hunting out of a groundblind, while I was using my Hunters View climbing stand. Now, I'm 66 years old but in fairly good condition and have been using this climbing stand for some years, although not too much last couple of years.

Yesterday I was about 18 feet up and was enjoying a beautiful day (however, saw no deer). Was fiddling with the harness and twisted myself a bit too much in one direction and suddenly got an extreme pain in the left shoulder and left side of my neck. I mean it was a severe pain when moving into a certain position. Sat down and found a somewhat comfortable postion and figured maybe I had pinched a nerve.

As I sat there slightly rotating the should to further ease the pain, it dawned on me that I may has some serious difficulty trying to climb down with this should hurting so bad.
I had a two-way radio and my buddy and I check in each hour, but as I thought about it I realized that he really could not help me get down, short of having a ladder.

As I played with the shoulder the pain did ease up significantly and eventually I managed to climb safely, but slowly to the ground.

Take-away lesson: Will not be using that climbing when hunting alone, and will try to be even more careful when I do use it.

DFREEMAN
 
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RE: Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby DFREEMAN » Fri Dec 17, 2010 1:13 pm

I can only suggest that if you get a climber, make sure it is a convertable 'sit and climb style like the Summit Python XLS(no longer in Production) or the I believe it is the Razor model. Don't skimp on the stand quality and remember sit and climb stands are a little heavier to carry by 3-5 lbs. Sit and climb stands reduce the lower body strength required or exerted and even allow a simple reach down to help in the tipping action of the climber with your hands.
Hunts for Meat

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Hawgnman
 
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RE: Climbing Tree-stands for older folks

Postby Hawgnman » Fri Dec 31, 2010 2:18 pm

I'm 69 and still use a climbing stand. I'm 6' 6" & 215 and I'm in the gym during off season about twice a week. I should be there more, but it's a start.

I suggest you stick with a ladder stand. If you chose to continue to use a climber, shorten the rope tying the two parts of the stand together. But if you chose to stick with a climber, always hunt with someone or hunt where cell phones work and tell someone where you are hunting. Then call them as soon as you are on the road. I have maps of my hunting properties with usually stand locations marked for my wife.

I've used API stands for the last 15 years, but this year I purchased a Summit Viper SS. It is a bit more stable than the API's as it grips the tree more on the side of the trunk. The API's gripping areas are closer together. Imagine a "V". The deeper in the "V" the grip is, the more unstable it will be. With the Viper on a soft bark, like a poplar, you had to pull the Viper off the tree since it grabs the tree securely.

I also strongly recommend the Hunter Safety System harness. I never leave the ground without a harness. I have three fused vertebrae from a work related accident. I don't want to land on my butt from 24' again!!!
Grace Happens

Jim /*
http://www.racksnspurs.com/


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